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The U.S. government has been running a quantum internet for over two years

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posted on May, 6 2013 @ 09:23 PM
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Its a little embarrassing to admit, but I first heard of this concept in a sci-fi video game:



I have no idea what the science:fiction ratio is for this explanation, but it sounds pretty close to the same thing to me. Today's sci-fi has become tomorrows reality on more than one occasion.




posted on May, 7 2013 @ 05:24 AM
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Anybody see a connection with this announcement and the "Astro-engineer" that visited ATS and started his own webpage a couple of years ago before he abruptly disappeared? He supposedly, and a co-worker, stumbled on to a quantum communication system issuing from one of the Mars' probes. That would be a perfect place for such a system.

Could such a system be used as a security over-ride system when the primary system is dependent upon SOL radio signals? Suppose probe sensors or cameras unknowingly sent back data that was not welcomed by the conventional spiel about Mars?

The Q-system gets to Earth some minutes ahead of the same data ahead of the standard SOL delivery. The SOL data is in some manner interfered with, spliced or changed in real time to keep it within the bounds of desired data? Who would know?



posted on May, 7 2013 @ 05:36 AM
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Legend has it that the later DSP satellites have quantum crypto sidelinks that can detect interception.

No idea if it's true.



posted on May, 7 2013 @ 06:21 AM
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reply to post by Slugworth
 


Oh! Mass Effect! I knew there was a game I'd played recently that mentioned it, but I couldn't remember what. Thanks! No need to be embarrassed about playing that series, it is high quality.



posted on May, 7 2013 @ 06:29 AM
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Originally posted by Cauliflower
15 years ago the Los Alamos web site had information about a quantum cryptography system for re-keying satellites. Worked equally well with polarized shuttered uplinks and fiber optics. Now they have it working through data hubs, no surprise. Should have been a cold war development for the CORONA era sats.

Historically we have relied on weak public key cryptography to authenticate E-commerce and that has its limits. This is good news! Much more robust multi channel encryption schemes that absolutely eliminate eavesdropping MITM attacks are possible.


This could protect government infrastructure in the U.S. from hackers working for other countries, for example, China.


QinetiQ was only one target in a broader cyberpillage. Beginning at least as early as 2007, Chinese computer spies raided the databanks of almost every major U.S. defense contractor and made off with some of the country’s most closely guarded technological secrets, according to two former Pentagon officials who asked not to be named because damage assessments of the incidents remain classified.


Source



posted on May, 7 2013 @ 06:34 AM
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Kind of reminds me of Skynet.

Spooky? Maybe.



posted on May, 7 2013 @ 06:37 AM
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Originally posted by Bedlam
Legend has it that the later DSP satellites have quantum crypto sidelinks that can detect interception.

No idea if it's true.


Here is what I found regarding quantum teleportation being used to communicate in a quantum manner wirelessly, especially in regards to satellites.


If developed, quantum teleportation satellites could allow spies to pass large amounts of information back and forth or create unhackable codes. Should we ever build quantum computers – which would be smaller and exponentially more powerful than modern computers, able to model complex phenomenon, rapidly crunch numbers, and render modern encryption keys useless – they would need quantum teleporters in order to be networked together in a quantum version of the internet.

China plans to launch a satellite with a quantum teleportation experiment payload in 2016 and the European, Japanese, and Canadian space agencies are hoping to fund their own quantum teleportation satellite projects in the coming years. Conspicuously, the U.S. is far behind the pack because of a bureaucratic reshuffling that left quantum communication research experiments without government support in 2008. Whoever loses this new competition could fail to capitalize on the promise of quantum communication altogether.


Source



posted on May, 7 2013 @ 11:43 AM
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reply to post by 19KTankCommander
 


Uhhh. that's what we now call the internet...

Anyhoo, this is a quantum network, not really the internet as it's a single network, but it's bringing quantum networks closer to full fledged reality.

I'm not sure that this has anything to do with entanglement, but I do know that with quantum computing your bit has 3 states, instead of two.

Computers are binary, push, pull, positive, negative, 1, 0. But, in quantum computer, it can be 1 AND 0 at the same time.

Fascinating stuff. i have also heard that some group has been able to extend an entangled pair communication far enough to be instantaneous to satellites in orbit. The future is looking bright, if we don't get nuked .



posted on May, 7 2013 @ 11:47 AM
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reply to post by darkbake
 


Ehhh, quantum teleporters aside....

entangled pairs work like this. Particle A is here on earth, you give it a clockwise rotation. Particle B is hundreds of miles away, and the instant you start nudging Particle A, particle B responds, as if they are linked through time and space.

That's how quantum communication would work. Zero latency communication, regardless of distance, regardless of the speed of light.

That's the key. Particle B responds instantly when particle A is modified. You can consider that to be a BIT. To send that bit at the speed of light, if the distance is great enough, there is a delay. With quantum entanglement there is no delay.

couple that with quantum computers able to do more tasks at once, and you've got some pretty out there sci fi technology.



posted on May, 7 2013 @ 12:28 PM
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reply to post by phishyblankwaters
 





entangled pairs work like this. Particle A is here on earth, you give it a clockwise rotation. Particle B is hundreds of miles away, and the instant you start nudging Particle A, particle B responds, as if they are linked through time and space. That's how quantum communication would work. Zero latency communication, regardless of distance, regardless of the speed of light.


The first part is correct.

But entanglement will never be used for actual FTL communications, because the state of the particle at one point is meaningless if there is no communication about the manipulation of the particle at the other point between both points.

And this communication can only go by classical, slower, means of communications.



posted on May, 7 2013 @ 03:39 PM
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Originally posted by SloAnPainful
reply to post by DaveStinger
 


Yes I know, but I am sure it's fast as hell. I was making a joke that apperently wasn't funny.

-SAP-

OMG! ----> do I know how that feels.



posted on May, 7 2013 @ 06:36 PM
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Originally posted by DaveStinger

Originally posted by darkbake
reply to post by DaveStinger
 


That is true - but would it be instant between the two quantum particles themselves? So it would still save time over a few light year distance, for example, compared to light-based communication?


There is no FTL travel of information between the entangled particles possible at all, because there is no way for info to travel between them.

It only appears to be to us......
edit on 6-5-2013 by DaveStinger because: (no reason given)


Correct.

There appears to be a FTL travel of "something" between the entangled particles (all attempts to find causal local explanations have been invalidated by experiment) but there is no known way to transmit useful classical Shannon information FTL. Correct explanation of the equations of motion as we know them requires FTL behavior, but no FTL information.

It seems as though conditional correlations can somehow be arranged to coincide, e.g. P1(x|y) can be made to be correlated with P2(x|y) at remote locations 1 and 2 faster than light, but the outcome cannot be transmitted FTL.
edit on 7-5-2013 by mbkennel because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 7 2013 @ 08:34 PM
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reply to post by phishyblankwaters
 


Thank you! I didn't understand what DaveStinger was saying.
edit on 7-5-2013 by darkbake because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 7 2013 @ 10:12 PM
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Originally posted by darkbake
reply to post by phishyblankwaters
 

Thank you! I didn't understand what DaveStinger was saying.
You might want to figure out what DaveStinger and mbkennel are saying because I think it's more correct than what phishyblankwaters said, talking about how FTL communication would work. We don't know how it would work because we've never seen FTL communication. Instantaneous action at a distance is not really communication.



posted on May, 7 2013 @ 10:21 PM
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This will never make it to "regular joe", consumer level.

It is entirely against the need of the government to snoop on its peoples.

But it is entirely FOR the government to keep its tidy little secrets,...secret.



posted on May, 8 2013 @ 05:13 AM
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Originally posted by mbkennel

Originally posted by DaveStinger

Originally posted by darkbake
reply to post by DaveStinger
 


That is true - but would it be instant between the two quantum particles themselves? So it would still save time over a few light year distance, for example, compared to light-based communication?


There is no FTL travel of information between the entangled particles possible at all, because there is no way for info to travel between them.

It only appears to be to us......
edit on 6-5-2013 by DaveStinger because: (no reason given)


Correct.

There appears to be a FTL travel of "something" between the entangled particles (all attempts to find causal local explanations have been invalidated by experiment) but there is no known way to transmit useful classical Shannon information FTL. Correct explanation of the equations of motion as we know them requires FTL behavior, but no FTL information.

It seems as though conditional correlations can somehow be arranged to coincide, e.g. P1(x|y) can be made to be correlated with P2(x|y) at remote locations 1 and 2 faster than light, but the outcome cannot be transmitted FTL.
edit on 7-5-2013 by mbkennel because: (no reason given)


This is just my theory but it could be explained in a very simple way.

There is in fact only one mechanism that allows for information to travel between the two points/particles, but it is not recognised as such by science.

The human consciousness.

It is literally the only connection between them. Explanations are sought in all sorts of speculative mechanisms who's existances cannot be proven, and the only existing connection gets ignored because it doesn't fit the current paradigm.

Although I can't explain how it would actually work, it would explain all quantum weirdness. The results always line up with the knowledge of the conscious observer(s).



posted on May, 8 2013 @ 05:15 AM
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Originally posted by darkbake
reply to post by phishyblankwaters
 


Thank you! I didn't understand what DaveStinger was saying.
edit on 7-5-2013 by darkbake because: (no reason given)


You could've asked for an explanation, I don't bite.




posted on May, 8 2013 @ 05:50 AM
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Originally posted by DaveStinger
reply to post by darkbake
 





So in quantum physics, two particles can be entangled and that means that when one of them is moved, the other one moves - it happens faster than the speed of light, and can be used to communicate instantly at a distance.


This is a common mistake.

It can't used for instant communication because there always has to be a secondairy means of communication between the two points about the manipulation, and this can only be done with a less than FTL speed.



That is conventional thinking, and what you're describing is a problem in Quantum mechanics termed 'Decoherence'.

Decoherence is conventionally thought of as the destruction (in communications) of the Quantum bit, or 'Qbit' by the action of not only measuring or observing the Qbit, but indeed ANY action performed on it.

So the thinking is (was) that the decoherence of the Qbit, essentially destroying it's Quantum properties and reducing it into an ordinary bit, would prevent Quantum communications using the phenomena of Quantum entanglement (action on one Quantum particle results in the reverse or opposite action spontaneously occurring in it's paired Quantum particle) from effectively emerging, as a regular signal (laser, radio etc.) would need to be present to piggy back the Quantum particle (say a photon).

This can be resolved, and resolved such that decoherence no longer is a problem.

The solution is a second set of Quantum 'interrogator' particles at both the sending and receiving ends of transmission.

Remember that ANY action by us on the Quantum particle or Qbit in the case of communications or computing, effectively destroys the Quantum effect?

Well..the obvious solution is to realise that while our observing, or reading, or interacting in any way destroys the Quantum effect...other Quantum particles or Qbits DO NOT destroy the effect.

All that is required is to have the interrogating of the transit Qbit, the information being sent and recieved done by a locally generated set of Quantum particles...yes the locally generated Qbits WILL experience decoherence, but that very decoherence will flip the particles and by that action alone, we will be able to access the information in the transit particles, without destroying them, but recording which locally generated particles tasked with interrogating the transit particles change value.

If a particle changes value, this can be read.

It's a little like a camera taking a photograph...the camera doesn't capture the subject...only a representation of the subject, a copy of where the photons reflected from the subject were and in what state they were in, when the camera made a copy of them to produce a photo.

Reading the local Quantum 'copy' values (which will have reduced from Quantum state by our interaction with it) will allow us to extrapolate the still Quantum information in the transit Quantum particles, which because they were interacted with by other Quantum particles, will not be affected by decoherence because we would NOT be interacting with them, only other local Quantum particles would be, which wouldn't affect the transit ones.

Easy peasy.



posted on May, 8 2013 @ 05:58 AM
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reply to post by MysterX
 





Easy peasy.


Right, that's why the consensus is that entanglement cannot be used for FTL communication.

It doesn't matter what intricate system you build around it, we always have to verify the manipulations to make sense of the results, and this will always require classical communication.

I wont even mention that no FTL anything is going on with entanglement, not even instantanious action at a distance, it merely appears to us like that.



posted on May, 8 2013 @ 04:12 PM
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They've been doing this in UK and EU also for a while. They've even announced their 60+ (now well+) mile apart instant comms. for a year or so.. My advice - destroy the Military-Industrial Complex using the Consumer-Industrial Complex - by permanently SEPARATING the two via PATENT LEGISLATION (remove the auto-M.I.C. patent confiscation)... BE FREE, BE QUICK and PLAY FAIR!
edit on 8-5-2013 by PrivateSi because: spelling + beer





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