Ancient Civilizations Quiz for ATSers

page: 6
65
<< 3  4  5    7  8  9 >>

log in

join

posted on Apr, 26 2013 @ 03:01 PM
link   

Originally posted by LastStarfighter
Is it a castle/fort used by the Templars

to which do you refer?




posted on Apr, 26 2013 @ 11:16 PM
link   
reply to post by punkinworks10
 


I think he was referring to the one that some thought was in Scotland... the native american ruins posted by
punkinwork10

It's funny because I read what do you prefer (in my head) as I glimpsed at what you wrote, preferably I would choose castle as Templars were holders and integrators.

Anyways since nobody has came forth with a new puzzle here is one :



Clue is :

Once a year the light shines right



posted on Apr, 27 2013 @ 12:49 AM
link   
reply to post by RAY1990
 


That would be newgrange in Ireland

Newgrange (Irish: Sí an Bhrú) [1] is a prehistoric monument in County Meath, Ireland, about one kilometre north of the River Boyne. [2] It was built about 3200 BC, [3][4]

during the Neolithic period, which makes it older than Stonehenge and the Egyptian pyramids. [5] Newgrange is a large circular mound with a stone passageway and chambers inside. The mound has a retaining wall at the front and is ringed by 'kerbstones' engraved with artwork. There is no agreement about what the site was used for, but it has been speculated that it had religious significance – it is aligned with the rising sun and its light floods the chamber on the winter solstice. It is the most famous monument within the Neolithic Brú na Bóinne complex, alongside the similar passage tomb mounds of Knowth and Dowth, and as such is a part of the Brú na Bóinne UNESCO World Heritage Site. Newgrange also shares many similarities with other Neolithic constructions in Western Europe, such as Maeshowe in Orkney, Scotland [6] and the Bryn Celli Ddu in Wales.

After its initial use, Newgrange was sealed and it remained so for several millennia, later appearing in Irish mythology and folklore. It first began to be studied by antiquarians in the 17th century AD and archeological excavations took place at the site over the following centuries. In the 1970s, the front of the monument was reconstructed, although some have questioned it. Today, Newgrange is a popular tourist site and, according to the archeologist Colin Renfrew, is "unhesitatingly regarded by the prehistorian as the great national monument of Ireland" and as one of the most important megalithic structures in Europe. [7]
edit on 27-4-2013 by punkinworks10 because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 27 2013 @ 01:15 AM
link   
reply to post by RAY1990
 


Mississippi mound builders... That is a "religous/ spiritual" structure?

Or not lol. I think Punkin got it
edit on 27-4-2013 by kimish because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 27 2013 @ 01:39 AM
link   
Ok,
I'm really going to stump every one. And I suspect that only someone living in or very familiar with the history of California will answer this one, if at all
This man made hole in the rock on the east side of the sierra Nevada mtns in California. It's an ovoid depression ground out of the rock.

It is a few miles north east of Mono Lake, in the middle of the desert.

It has a connection with this place
, where the miwok say the first people survived the great flood.



That lies 130miles west , over these mountains, the sierra Nevada,


About 60 miles south of the hole in the rock is a place called glass mountain, that supplied a valuable trade commodity.
This trade commodity and the hole in the desert rock have a relationship with the native people of central California, the miwok, but the miwok did not make the hole.

So my question is what is the hole for?, who made it?, and how does it relate to glass mountain and the miwok.
Also why is the holes location in the desert significant,
If nobody gets it in 24 hrs ill give up answer and pass on to next question.


edit on 27-4-2013 by punkinworks10 because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 27 2013 @ 01:51 AM
link   
It's an aqueduct from the people that lived there before the Miwok.? Use to transfer water from the mountains to below for travelers along the trade route? It's significant because it's the first water system like that in N. America and it provided water to areas that had little of it.

Ok, I cheated only briefly, the people that were there before the Miwok were human and animal spirits and creator God and trickster God.
edit on 27-4-2013 by kimish because: (no reason given)


edit on 27-4-2013 by kimish because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 27 2013 @ 01:52 AM
link   
A couple of clues, trade in these commodities goes back tens of thousands of years or more, and the jomon made extensive use of the Japanese version of one.



posted on Apr, 27 2013 @ 01:54 AM
link   
reply to post by kimish
 


No, but good try.
And the hole in rock is on ancient trail and near water.



posted on Apr, 27 2013 @ 01:58 AM
link   
reply to post by punkinworks10
 


Research is not cheating, and I'm glad you looked up the miwok.
But , according to the theft of fire legend there were already people here when the miwok arrived. But that's for another discussion.



posted on Apr, 27 2013 @ 01:58 AM
link   
I'm clueless now. I'm sure once I hear the answer I'm going to be giving myself a ginormous face palm.



posted on Apr, 27 2013 @ 02:03 AM
link   
Here's a clue as to who made the hole,
When they captured escaped horses from the Spanish, some left there homeland and became the commanche.



posted on Apr, 27 2013 @ 02:03 AM
link   
They used it to build boats or they used it to transport boats to the coast. So, there was a canal of sorts in the area?



posted on Apr, 27 2013 @ 02:06 AM
link   
reply to post by kimish
 


It might be almost unaswerable, but the answer is in one of my posts.



posted on Apr, 27 2013 @ 02:06 AM
link   
Plains Indians dug the holes for water. They did so because where they were from water was more plentiful than it was in their new home. So, being intelligent, they had the ingenuity to build wells to hold water



posted on Apr, 27 2013 @ 02:07 AM
link   
reply to post by kimish
 


No canals, and those mountains are 14,000 feet tall



posted on Apr, 27 2013 @ 02:10 AM
link   
It was the Jomon Peoples.

Ding ding ding???
edit on 27-4-2013 by kimish because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 27 2013 @ 02:17 AM
link   

Originally posted by kimish
I'm tapping out. I proimise. lol., no more guesses from me, for now.

I appreciate the effort.
Its a brutal one.



posted on Apr, 27 2013 @ 06:35 AM
link   
reply to post by punkinworks10
 


Is the link to the mountain obsidian similar to jade?
Maybe the hole was used for smelting of some sort? other than that all I can find is a mythological reference to the Miwok people, I'm kinda stumped with that hole... even google isn't helping lol can't wait to find out what it was used for.



posted on Apr, 27 2013 @ 09:56 AM
link   
reply to post by RAY1990
 


Holes like that are common in the forests on the west side of those mountains, but rare in the desert on the east side.



posted on Apr, 27 2013 @ 03:47 PM
link   
We'll be discussing this topic on tonights ATS Live! Radio show. Join us!

Details here - www.abovetopsecret.com...





top topics
 
65
<< 3  4  5    7  8  9 >>

log in

join