Ancient Civilizations Quiz for ATSers

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posted on Apr, 25 2013 @ 11:02 AM
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reply to post by diqiushiwojia
 


The land around seems to be too dry to be Scottish or British. Is it Spanish or Italian?




posted on Apr, 25 2013 @ 11:07 AM
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reply to post by diqiushiwojia
 


Thanks for not spilling the beans



posted on Apr, 25 2013 @ 11:16 AM
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reply to post by Trueman
 


Here a clue about the people who built it ,
They have a specific dental anomaly,

dental polymorphism characterized by an exaggerated distobuccal rotation of the paracone in combination with the presence of a fossa at the intersection of the distal occlusal ridge and distal marginal ridge of upper first premolars

This trait shows up in ancient people of the region. And its distribution follows a major language family.



posted on Apr, 25 2013 @ 11:35 AM
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Originally posted by punkinworks10
Can't,let this thread fall by the wayside,
So heres one



Who? When? And where?


Is this Qumran? (Kumran) I don't know how to spell it. An ancient sect of abstinent (a)gnostics (one or the other) in the Mid East.
edit on 25-4-2013 by kimish because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 25 2013 @ 11:47 AM
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reply to post by kimish
 


Nope ,
Climate is similar though

The people who built it were truly ancient ones.



posted on Apr, 25 2013 @ 11:49 AM
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reply to post by punkinworks10
 


Troglodytes (sp?) in Ethiopia. Some time prior to Christs existance lol.

Disclaimer: I am answering without the help of google
edit on 25-4-2013 by kimish because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 25 2013 @ 12:53 PM
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reply to post by kimish
 


In the latter day this area these ruins was settled by Christians, yes .

But it post dates Christ
edit on 25-4-2013 by punkinworks10 because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 25 2013 @ 12:57 PM
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Originally posted by punkinworks10
reply to post by Trueman
 


Here a clue about the people who built it ,
They have a specific dental anomaly,

dental polymorphism characterized by an exaggerated distobuccal rotation of the paracone in combination with the presence of a fossa at the intersection of the distal occlusal ridge and distal marginal ridge of upper first premolars

This trait shows up in ancient people of the region. And its distribution follows a major language family.



Uto-aztecan ?



posted on Apr, 25 2013 @ 01:04 PM
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Originally posted by punkinworks10
reply to post by kimish
 


In the latter day this area these ruins was settled by Christians, yes .

But it post dates Christ
edit on 25-4-2013 by punkinworks10 because: (no reason given)


Aha...good clue. Hopi ?....Wupatki???

www.sangres.com...
edit on 25-4-2013 by Trueman because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 25 2013 @ 01:24 PM
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reply to post by Trueman
 


So very close, but not quite.



posted on Apr, 25 2013 @ 01:44 PM
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Originally posted by punkinworks10
reply to post by Trueman
 


So very close, but not quite.


I'm so sure it's Hopi, just can't find the perfect match



posted on Apr, 25 2013 @ 01:46 PM
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I give up Punkin. What is the answer??? do tell, please please please



posted on Apr, 25 2013 @ 01:46 PM
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Hovenweep National Monument.


Noted for its solitude and undeveloped, natural character, Hovenweep National Monument is a group of five well-preserved village ruins over a 20-mile radius of mesa tops and canyons. The name Hovenweep is Paiute/Ute meaning "deserted valley." The area was once home to more than 2,500 people in 900 A.D. In 1923, Hovenweep was proclaimed by President Warren G. Harding a unit of the national park system. These ancient Pueblo Indian ruins include towers that remind visitors of European castles. Straddling the Utah-Colorado border, the ruins were built about the same time as medieval fortresses.


www.utah.com...

BTW,I didn't cheat,I have been there before.Beautiful country.
edit on 25-4-2013 by kdog1982 because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 25 2013 @ 01:58 PM
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Originally posted by kdog1982
Hovenweep National Monument.


Noted for its solitude and undeveloped, natural character, Hovenweep National Monument is a group of five well-preserved village ruins over a 20-mile radius of mesa tops and canyons. The name Hovenweep is Paiute/Ute meaning "deserted valley." The area was once home to more than 2,500 people in 900 A.D. In 1923, Hovenweep was proclaimed by President Warren G. Harding a unit of the national park system. These ancient Pueblo Indian ruins include towers that remind visitors of European castles. Straddling the Utah-Colorado border, the ruins were built about the same time as medieval fortresses.


www.utah.com...

BTW,I didn't cheat,I have been there before.Beautiful country.
edit on 25-4-2013 by kdog1982 because: (no reason given)


Kdog, you nailed. Your turn.



posted on Apr, 25 2013 @ 02:08 PM
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Think of oil as to where these mysterious stones are found.



posted on Apr, 25 2013 @ 02:11 PM
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Originally posted by kdog1982
Hovenweep National Monument.


Noted for its solitude and undeveloped, natural character, Hovenweep National Monument is a group of five well-preserved village ruins over a 20-mile radius of mesa tops and canyons. The name Hovenweep is Paiute/Ute meaning "deserted valley." The area was once home to more than 2,500 people in 900 A.D. In 1923, Hovenweep was proclaimed by President Warren G. Harding a unit of the national park system. These ancient Pueblo Indian ruins include towers that remind visitors of European castles. Straddling the Utah-Colorado border, the ruins were built about the same time as medieval fortresses.


www.utah.com...

BTW,I didn't cheat,I have been there before.Beautiful country.
edit on 25-4-2013 by kdog1982 because: (no reason given)



Yep you nailed it,

Hovenweep Nat. Monument.

I regret not going by there when I was in Utah for WSBK last year.



posted on Apr, 25 2013 @ 02:18 PM
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I know the answer , but ill let someone else play
, I just happened to read about it a couple of days ago.



posted on Apr, 25 2013 @ 02:18 PM
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reply to post by punkinworks10
 
At first I was thinking I saw those ruins at the grand canyon,then I had to retrace my route and there it was.



posted on Apr, 25 2013 @ 02:19 PM
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reply to post by kdog1982
 


would that be from the Assyns (sp?) pronounced Ass-eens



posted on Apr, 25 2013 @ 02:22 PM
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reply to post by kimish
 


Nope.The site is really old.Around 4500 BCE.





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