Ancient Civilizations Quiz for ATSers

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posted on May, 28 2013 @ 08:45 PM
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Originally posted by Hanslune
reply to post by miner49r
 


Incan, Ollantaytambo, Peru

Here a PDF which might help you on your questions
edit on 28/5/13 by Hanslune because: Added link



Ding Ding Ding ..... nailed it.

This was one of the first photos that got me interested in ancient structures. To this day I still wonder how they cut that block and got it out.




posted on May, 28 2013 @ 09:16 PM
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Got it....but I will let someone else have a crack at it. Very interesting it would almost seem to mark a transitional period.

Thanks for the .PDF.....back to reading



posted on May, 29 2013 @ 10:53 AM
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reply to post by miner49r
 


The 'tower' in the forefront is not a ruin abut actually left unfnished you can tell by the constructors leaving the moving 'handles' on the stones.

They have a technical name more sophisticated than 'handles' but I cannot think of it at this time.



posted on May, 30 2013 @ 12:25 PM
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Originally posted by Hanslune
reply to post by miner49r
 


The 'tower' in the forefront is not a ruin abut actually left unfnished you can tell by the constructors leaving the moving 'handles' on the stones.

They have a technical name more sophisticated than 'handles' but I cannot think of it at this time.


I believe the "handles" are called "Bosses" I may be wrong though. I think there was a reference to them in the .PDF you posted up.

What captures my interest these Sillustani are Pre-Incan Aymara burial mounds that were later refaced or remodeled with Incan stone work. One would think if the Inca's conquered the Kolla/Aymara that the Aymara tradition would fade with time and go by the way side. Instead, the Sillustani were kept up and restored with Incan stone work.



posted on May, 30 2013 @ 08:24 PM
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Originally posted by miner49r

Originally posted by Hanslune
reply to post by miner49r
 


The 'tower' in the forefront is not a ruin abut actually left unfnished you can tell by the constructors leaving the moving 'handles' on the stones.

They have a technical name more sophisticated than 'handles' but I cannot think of it at this time.


I believe the "handles" are called "Bosses" I may be wrong though. I think there was a reference to them in the .PDF you posted up.

What captures my interest these Sillustani are Pre-Incan Aymara burial mounds that were later refaced or remodeled with Incan stone work. One would think if the Inca's conquered the Kolla/Aymara that the Aymara tradition would fade with time and go by the way side. Instead, the Sillustani were kept up and restored with Incan stone work.


I believe it was more of the fact that the Incan's took on the stone working expertise from conquered people....I'll wait for someone more versed in that to correct me !



posted on Jun, 2 2013 @ 02:59 AM
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This is a question without an image


Lieutenant C. J. Cruttenden, who wrote a memoir describing this portion of the Somali coast dated 12 May 1848, provided an account of the Berbera fair and an account of the only visible traces of man at the site: "an aqueduct of stone and chunam, some nine miles in length", which had once emptied into a presently dry reservoir adjacent to the ruins of a mosque. He explored part of its course from the reservoir past a number of tombs built of stones taken from the aqueduct to reach a spring, above which lay "the remains of a small fort or tower of chunam and stone ... on the hill-side immediately over the spring." Cruttenden noted that in "style it was different to any houses now found on the Somali coast," and concluded with noting the presence in "the neighbourhood of the fort above mentioned [an] abundance of broken glass and pottery ... from which I infer that it was a place of considerable antiquity; but, though diligent search was made, no traces of inscriptions could be discovered."


So who built the aqueduct in Somalia?

Second query where and what is this? (the central structure)



Also what is this below? Who made it and where is it now?

edit on 2/6/13 by Hanslune because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 6 2013 @ 06:25 AM
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reply to post by Hanslune
 


Is it Las Khorey in the Warsangali Sultanate? If so, built by the ethnic Somali branch of the Darod Clan in the 13th Century. The Warsangali fought the Abyssinians and attacked and uprooted Christian communities in Galgala.

As to the item at the bottom, it looks like it is used to weigh items, possibly cloths?



posted on Jun, 7 2013 @ 03:02 PM
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Originally posted by Flavian
reply to post by Hanslune
 


Is it Las Khorey in the Warsangali Sultanate? If so, built by the ethnic Somali branch of the Darod Clan in the 13th Century. The Warsangali fought the Abyssinians and attacked and uprooted Christian communities in Galgala.

As to the item at the bottom, it looks like it is used to weigh items, possibly cloths?


Correct region but not the correct site

The bottom one is a Roman version of a 'Swiss' multi-tool



posted on May, 9 2014 @ 07:05 PM
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a reply to: Gazrok

Here you go!

The "Candelabro" geoglyph in Paracas, close to Nazca, Peru, has been puzzling scientists from all over the world - including Erich von Däniken. They had set up all sorts of theories and ironically overlooked the most simple interpretation (typical for specialists who miss the wood for the trees) It's all about the "tree of life", which is itself part of the "Flower of Life", which underlies every imaginable form.




posted on May, 9 2014 @ 10:22 PM
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a reply to: kabbalist

Well first of all Daniken isn't a scientist, he is an author of fringe stuff, hotel administrator and felon. That said.....

So you think it's an aspect of Jewish ritual from centuries after its probably construction? Why?



posted on May, 11 2014 @ 07:40 PM
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I have been lurking for a bit now in this sub-forum. Just wanted to say how fun this thread is! thanks





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