Ancient Civilizations Quiz for ATSers

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posted on May, 21 2013 @ 06:26 PM
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So,
Anybody?
I'll give it a while.




posted on May, 21 2013 @ 07:24 PM
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reply to post by punkinworks10
 


I'll take an amateur's guess on the cave. One of the one's near Oaxaca? Oldest radio-carbon dated assorted vegetables were found there. Zapotecs as descendants?



posted on May, 22 2013 @ 08:53 AM
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Originally posted by MuzzleBreak
reply to post by punkinworks10
 


I'll take an amateur's guess on the cave. One of the one's near Oaxaca? Oldest radio-carbon dated assorted vegetables were found there. Zapotecs as descendants?


You and Hans are so very close,

Buy yet so far away



It is guitarrero cave in Peru.

The site cave is especially important for the evidence it contains of the very earliest cultivated plants in South America, perhaps even of the earliest maize:

Aji (Capsicum baccatum): first appears at Guitarrero cave 10,500 before present.

Oca (Oxalis tuberosus): first appears at Guitarrero cave 10,500 y 9,500 before present.

Aji (Capsicum chinense): first appears at Guitarrero cave 10,000 to 9,500 before present.

Frijol (Phaseolus vulgaris): first known from Guitarrero 10,000 y 9,500 years before today.

Pallar (Phaseolus lunatus): first appears at Guitarrero cave 10,000 to 9,5000 years beforetoday; after 7,800 years before today it appears on the Pacific coast.

Lucuma (Lucuma bifera): first appears at Guitarrero cave 10,000 to 7,500 before present. Appears at Ayacucho 6,400 a 5,100 years before present.

Olluco (Ullucus tuberosus): first appears 10,000 years before present at the cave Tres Ventanas in Chile and next at Guitarrero cave 7,500 before today.

Zapallo (Cucurbita sp.): first appears at Guitarrero cave 9,000 before present.

Maize or corn (Zea mays): first traces (but not certainly identified) from Guitarrero cave from 8,200 years before present. Appears definitively between 6,400 and 5,100 before present at Ayacucho province in central Peru.


From George Webers Lonely Islands


www.andaman.org...


And I highly recomend the site, it is chock full of good stuff.

www.andaman.org...



posted on May, 26 2013 @ 09:18 PM
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The structures are

Yakhchal

Interesting about the cave - I was way off it would seem!



posted on May, 26 2013 @ 10:04 PM
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reply to post by Hanslune
 


No wonder your pix made me think of "ice cream" . Strange.



posted on May, 26 2013 @ 11:22 PM
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Originally posted by Hanslune
The structures are

Yakhchal

Interesting about the cave - I was way off it would seem!


Hey there hans,
You basically got it, it is an influential early agriculture site just a farther south.
What I find most interesting is, how early domesticated corn shows up in the cave, some 4000miles from where it's found as a wild plant. And I'll have to admit that picture of the teosinte, was taken near an early agriculture site in Mexico, where teosinte still found in the wild.



posted on May, 26 2013 @ 11:29 PM
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reply to post by Hanslune
 


Wow, I had no idea an ancient evaporative ice house. That is crazy, it's just like the saloons in desert Nevada during the gold and silver rush. They would cut blocks of ice from frozen lakes in winter and store it in "caves" covered in straw and the ice would last all summer. So the prospectors could have ice cold beer in the scorching Nevada summers.



posted on May, 26 2013 @ 11:40 PM
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reply to post by punkinworks10
 


If I understand correctly, they were actually making ice by evaporative cooling?



posted on May, 27 2013 @ 12:27 AM
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reply to post by MuzzleBreak
 


Yes in a manner of speaking they were,
So as I understand bow they work, ice was stored in the structure, and the insulation kept it cool. And the water from the melting ice from the previous winter was directed into the shade of a wall where it froze and was used to replenish the ice in storage. It's really brilliant, and way ahead of the romans, Chinese, and andeans who used runners or other "fast" transportation to transport ice from high mountain glaciers.



posted on May, 27 2013 @ 01:44 AM
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Originally posted by punkinworks10
reply to post by Hanslune
 


Wow, I had no idea an ancient evaporative ice house. That is crazy, it's just like the saloons in desert Nevada during the gold and silver rush. They would cut blocks of ice from frozen lakes in winter and store it in "caves" covered in straw and the ice would last all summer. So the prospectors could have ice cold beer in the scorching Nevada summers.


The Yankees and the Italians did the same in the 19th century shipping ice to India (the British needed it for their G & T) and the entire world.



posted on May, 27 2013 @ 02:11 AM
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Hey ther Hans
I remember reading about a man in the 1870's that cut blocks of ice from the great lakes in the winter , and shipped them covers in wet straw all the way to nevada.
And when I was a child I grew up near one of the main shipping point for central cal produce. And there was an evaporative ice tower from the 20's that opporated until the early 80's



posted on May, 28 2013 @ 01:46 AM
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For our smart people

What culture is this associated with?

Found in what modern country?

What is it?





posted on May, 28 2013 @ 08:35 AM
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reply to post by Hanslune
 


Is it Maya from Guatemala



posted on May, 28 2013 @ 10:00 AM
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Originally posted by punkinworks10
reply to post by Hanslune
 


Is it Maya from Guatemala


Good attempt but...

No on the Maya but you're in the right region but wrong modern country. What 's it used for?


edit on 28/5/13 by Hanslune because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 28 2013 @ 03:29 PM
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Is it a Quern / Metate from Costa Rica?



A metate (or mealing stone) is a mortar, a ground stone tool used for processing grain and seeds. In traditional Mesoamerican culture, metates were typically used by women who would grind calcified maize and other organic materials during food preparation


ETA: This looks like a flying panel ceremonial Metate which are among the most complex. Who or what peoples? I am going to guess the Chibcha peoples.
edit on 28-5-2013 by miner49r because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 28 2013 @ 07:02 PM
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Originally posted by miner49r
Is it a Quern / Metate from Costa Rica?



A metate (or mealing stone) is a mortar, a ground stone tool used for processing grain and seeds. In traditional Mesoamerican culture, metates were typically used by women who would grind calcified maize and other organic materials during food preparation


ETA: This looks like a flying panel ceremonial Metate which are among the most complex. Who or what peoples? I am going to guess the Chibcha peoples.
edit on 28-5-2013 by miner49r because: (no reason given)


Very good spot on



posted on May, 28 2013 @ 07:19 PM
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This is a terrific thread
edit on 28-5-2013 by zazzafrazz because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 28 2013 @ 07:19 PM
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reply to post by miner49r
 


Very good
I thought it was central American, but that was all Ihad



posted on May, 28 2013 @ 07:42 PM
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Here is one that shouldn't be too hard.

The first clue should be the lichen on the rocks.





Bonus kudos if you can figure out how they cut the back side of the bottom stone (plug) and removed it..... I sure don't have a clue.



posted on May, 28 2013 @ 08:27 PM
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reply to post by miner49r
 


Incan, Ollantaytambo, Peru

Here a PDF which might help you on your questions
edit on 28/5/13 by Hanslune because: Added link


New image for your consideration




Where, who and what was it used for....and what can you say about the closest one?
edit on 28/5/13 by Hanslune because: (no reason given)





 
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