Novus Ordo Seclorum - Novae Tabulae - E PLURIBUS UNUM - Implicatio

page: 1
13
<<   2  3  4 >>

log in

join

posted on Mar, 3 2013 @ 01:39 PM
link   
In the first century, Pilate asked Jesus, "What is truth?" This was a very important question. Within this thread, I will seek to show the answer. With all truth, seeing clearly demands that we see each side. With truth, as with any reflection, there are two sides. One is a mirror of the other. They both look much the same. Is there a difference between the image and the one that casts it? Do images have shadows?

When I arrived home yesterday form a day working, I had a package waiting. I have been slowly expanding my collection of dictionaries, lexicons. My new book to review today was the Cassell's Dictionary of Latin to English and English to Latin. One of the things I have come to realize is this: Most of the lexicons and dictionaries you can order in Latin and Greek are missing key words defining the world around us. The main body of these lexicons give you a bear minimum of words, but leave out very important words that might lead a person toward defining the true nature of the world around them. I will spare you with examples, but I would like to dive into one central topic that is known.

If you want to know the secrets behind the veil, know the linguistics and morphology of the root languages. Latin is very important to this endeavor. It's not so important to know the words themselves as it is to know their associations on the branch they come from. The branches are scattered around each language. English holds many of the missing pieces. If you are careful with your search on the internet, you can find the missing pieces and construct the tree. Once you construct the tree, the rest falls into place.

I use more Latin words than needed. Why? Context builds the branch of truth around the fruit. You need to see a wiser view to see the true view.

-NOVUS ORDO SECLORUM

Noveensiles Divi - gods whose worship had been introduced from foreign countries
Novicius - of Persons who have not long been enslaved.
Novitas - New Nobility
Novo - Renew - To receive
Novus - New, fresh, young. A field reploughed. Political change and revolution. New account books.
Novae Tabulae - Money-changers shops in the forum which had been rebuilt.
Novus Delictis - Not a new crime. Inexperienced in crime.

Ordeum - Hordeum (barley harvest) Barley is a poor mans food. When the barley is gone, the slave revolt. it's the last straw so to speak since barley fed the livestock.
Ordia prima - Primordia - The first, beginning, commencement or origin.
Ordinarius - In order
Ordino - to set in order
Ordior - to begin a web, lay the warp. To commence with work. To begin a weave, to lay the warp, to lay the threads in order.
Ordo - Line up. Order. Rank. Politically and socially, an order, rank, class; senatorius, or amplissimus, the senatorial body. The body of knights.

Here is where it gets interesting. Seclorum is not listed in my lexicon. The only reference I have is this:

Secespita - Sacrifical knife
Secessio - Cutting apart
Secessus - going apart
Secludo - To shut off
Seco - Sectum, or to cut

Lorum - a strap of leather. From my studies of Hebrew, I have noticed how words connect across roots. With this word, you need to know what the leather strap does? It binds and holds something together. From this, we can then connect the cutting of what hold something together. Holds what? Society and leadership of many to one.

The final definition: A New Nobility to set In Order what is Cut. The first order of business is the end. Cut the first order so that the second nobility can rise. Why? To cancel debts of the moneychangers and create new account books. Before this happens, the old account is run into the ground and sucked for everything it is worth. Those who hoard the gold are the kings of the new order. They must burn the house down so that it can be rebuilt in their image.

-E PLURIBUS UNUM

E or Ex - Out of.

Plurifariam - On many sides and from many places.
Plurimus or Multus - Multitude of many persons

Pluribus - Is it interesting to know that this word does not appear in my lexicon.

Plur is plural or more that one.

ibus or ubus is added to many Latin words. For instance, mulier is woman. Mulieribus is women.

Unum or Unis is One.

In the case of pluribus, we are speaking of many unified units. I see this as the various soverign nations, which are microcosms of the goal and great work of the NWO. They wish to unify the entire body of mankind into one body of many parts.

The meaning of this is not hard to see. From many come one. If we view this from the standpoint of the Bible, we see that from One come many. Do you see how this truth is mirrored? As I stated before, Pilate had a question for Jesus. That question has an answer and it is seen by comparing the two sides of will. For will to be free, there must be two sides. One side seeks the good on self. The other side seeks the good of others. Above, we see that the intention is to bring many into one body and rule.

-ANNUIT COEPTIS - From the great seal of the United States.

-Annus - A circuit (circle), as in the circuit of the sun. Tempus Anni is the season of change.
-Annuo - They approve.
-Annuit - 3rd person Singular to approve.
-Coeptum - He approves of the undertaking. Commencement of an undertaking (The Great Work).

To extend the meaning, we need Coemptio, which implies a 'mock' sale of one joined with another. A ficticious sale of an estate to rid the sacrificial duties to it.

Coeo - The movement of persons.

Coepio - reference from Coeptum, being replaced by those of incipio (Verb).

What is the Great seal? It is "With God's Seal." He (God) approves their undertaking. It is the commencement of the "Great Work" of the Masons. In other words, God has favored our undertakings.

My question is this: Has He?

Here is where I can now compare to what I see of truth. I can only answer this question for myself, "What is truth?"

For me, the truth is found in a few more Latin Words. Again, you can't find these in the Lexicons for the most part. You must search other sources.

Amni - River of Life

Amnio - Bowl where the blood of the sacrificial lamb is contained.

Amnion - Covering of the waters in the womb.

Amniotic Fluid - Waters of the womb (Matrix).

Amnesia - Condition of the waters. Forgetfulness

Amnesty - Forgiveness in the waters.

Connect this to the sacrifice of the lamb of God. From one comes many. What is the purpose? Is the purpose to unify the many for the fortunes of the few? NO! This is opposite of truth. Why are we involved (Baptized) into the waters of life? To repent of ONE sin. That one sin is pride and selfishness. The exact cause of the sickness is taking rather than giving. The mark of the thief is their debt.

Implexus - Interwoven.

-IMPLICATIO - entwining or interweaving. Our English word for this is involution. We are entwined with the animal of the material world. The beast is what were are here to overcome. Which side of truth are we seeking by chasing a new world order? Does God approve?

Involution is an implication of man. Light reveals what it hits. An implication is the evidence that shows someone to be involved in a crime.

"The city on seven hills will be destroyed, and the formidable Judge will judge his people." Careful the cornerstone of the temple you set in place.

Feed the Sheep!




edit on 3-3-2013 by EnochWasRight because: (no reason given)




posted on Mar, 3 2013 @ 02:04 PM
link   

Originally posted by EnochWasRight
In the first century, Cesar asked Jesus, "What is truth?"


Really? When did 'Cesar' (or Caesar for that matter) hold a conversation with Jesus?


Here is where it gets interesting. Seclorum is not listed in my lexicon. The only reference I have is this.


That is because your book is based on Classical Latin. Medieval Latin saw the shift from the Classical 'æ' to 'e'. The word you should be looking up is 'sæclorum'. The phrase in question is taken from Virgil's Fourth Eclouge and reads 'Magnus ab integro sæclorum nascitur ordo', 'The great order of the ages is born afresh'.


Pluribus - Is it interesting to know that this word does not appear in my lexicon.


The almost exact phrase was used again by Virgil (who may not be the orignal author) in his poem Moretum. It reads 'color est e pluribus unus' and refers to blending of colors into one.



edit on 3-3-2013 by AugustusMasonicus because: networkdude has no beer.....in any language



posted on Mar, 3 2013 @ 02:13 PM
link   
reply to post by AugustusMasonicus
 


Agree.


The forms saecla, saeclorum etc. were normal alternatives to the more common saecula etc. throughout the history of Latin poetry and prose. The form saeculorum is impossible in hexameter verse: the ae and o are long, the u short by position. For the medieval exchange between ae, æ and e, see Æ; the word medieval (mediæval) itself is another example. Medieval Christians read Virgil's poem as a prophecy of the coming of Christ. The Augustan Age, although pre-Christian, was viewed as a golden age preparing the world for the coming of Christ.

The great poets of this age were viewed as a source of revelation and light upon the Christian mysteries to come. [2] The word seclorum does not mean "secular", as one might assume, but is the genitive (possessive) plural form of the word saeculum, meaning (in this context) generation, century, or age. Saeculum did come to mean "age, world" in late, Christian Latin, and "secular" is derived from it, through secularis. However, the adjective "secularis," meaning "worldly," is not equivalent to the genitive plural "seclorum," meaning "of the ages."[3] Thus the motto Novus ordo seclorum can be translated as "A new order of the ages." It was proposed by Charles Thomson, the Latin expert who was involved in the design of the Great Seal of the United States, to signify "the beginning of the new American Era" as of the date of the Declaration of Independence.


Novus ordo seclorum



posted on Mar, 3 2013 @ 02:15 PM
link   
In This Thread, you misspelled organizations and ambitions.

Thank you for the information.


Originally posted by AugustusMasonicus

Originally posted by EnochWasRight
In the first century, Cesar asked Jesus, "What is truth?"


Really? When did 'Cesar' (or Caesar for that matter) hold a convesation with Jesus?


Here is where it gets interesting. Seclorum is not listed in my lexicon. The only reference I have is this.


That is because your book is based on Classical Latin. Medieval Latin saw the shift from the Classical 'æ' to 'e'. The word you should be looking up is 'sæclorum'. The phrase in question is taken from Virgil's Fourth Eclouge and reads 'Magnus ab integro sæclorum nascitur ordo', 'The great order of the ages is born afresh'.


Pluribus - Is it interesting to know that this word does not appear in my lexicon.


The almost exact phrase was used again by Virgil (who may not be the orignal author) in his poem Moretum. It reads 'color est e pluribus unus' and refers to blending of colors into one.



edit on 3-3-2013 by AugustusMasonicus because: networkdude has no beer.....in any language
edit on 3-3-2013 by EnochWasRight because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 3 2013 @ 02:20 PM
link   
Interesting. How does this fit with the Mason's "Great Work?" From the looks of the temple they build, the main framework seems to be modeled toward feeding the few by the labors of the many. Is this what Christ had in mind when he told Peter to feed the sheep?


Originally posted by sonnny1
reply to post by AugustusMasonicus
 


Agree.


The forms saecla, saeclorum etc. were normal alternatives to the more common saecula etc. throughout the history of Latin poetry and prose. The form saeculorum is impossible in hexameter verse: the ae and o are long, the u short by position. For the medieval exchange between ae, æ and e, see Æ; the word medieval (mediæval) itself is another example. Medieval Christians read Virgil's poem as a prophecy of the coming of Christ. The Augustan Age, although pre-Christian, was viewed as a golden age preparing the world for the coming of Christ.

The great poets of this age were viewed as a source of revelation and light upon the Christian mysteries to come. [2] The word seclorum does not mean "secular", as one might assume, but is the genitive (possessive) plural form of the word saeculum, meaning (in this context) generation, century, or age. Saeculum did come to mean "age, world" in late, Christian Latin, and "secular" is derived from it, through secularis. However, the adjective "secularis," meaning "worldly," is not equivalent to the genitive plural "seclorum," meaning "of the ages."[3] Thus the motto Novus ordo seclorum can be translated as "A new order of the ages." It was proposed by Charles Thomson, the Latin expert who was involved in the design of the Great Seal of the United States, to signify "the beginning of the new American Era" as of the date of the Declaration of Independence.


Novus ordo seclorum



posted on Mar, 3 2013 @ 02:20 PM
link   

Originally posted by EnochWasRight
In This Thread, you misspelled organizations and ambitions.


And? What does that have to do with the fact that your entire Original Post is flawed based on your incorrect assumptions of Latin?

Or that you invented a dialouge between Caesar (which one?) and Jesus?


edit on 3-3-2013 by AugustusMasonicus because: networkdude has no beer but at least he knows not to make up stories about historical persons



posted on Mar, 3 2013 @ 02:26 PM
link   
reply to post by EnochWasRight
 


Hey, Enoch. Grab yourself a napkin - you've just been served!

...always wanted to use that line.
Next time, do some research instead of listening to your armchair certificate of Latin Mastery.
edit on 3-3-2013 by AfterInfinity because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 3 2013 @ 02:29 PM
link   
Actually, it was Pilate. Language has a morphology that relates to the broader meaning of the words used. More meaning brings more awareness. Related words in the chain can show more of the story. What about that "Great Work?" How do you define the "Great Work?"


Originally posted by AugustusMasonicus

Originally posted by EnochWasRight
In This Thread, you misspelled organizations and ambitions.


And? What does that have to do with the fact that your entire Original Post is flawed based on your incorrect assumptions of Latin?

Or that you invented a dialouge between Caesar (which one?) and Jesus?


edit on 3-3-2013 by AugustusMasonicus because: networkdude has no beer but at least he knows not to make up stories about historical persons



posted on Mar, 3 2013 @ 02:38 PM
link   

Originally posted by EnochWasRight

Interesting. How does this fit with the Mason's "Great Work?" From the looks of the temple they build, the main framework seems to be modeled toward feeding the few by the labors of the many. Is this what Christ had in mind when he told Peter to feed the sheep?



I don't profess to be a Mason, so to conclude that Latin, Masonry, Christ, Peter and laboring towards feeding the few, from the many would probobly be something to ask a Mason. Second, There are many linguistics parallels, Latin, Sanskrit, Greek also.

Bede, Ecclesiastical History of the English People



posted on Mar, 3 2013 @ 02:50 PM
link   

Originally posted by EnochWasRight
Actually, it was Pilate.


How do you confuse a Roman Prefect with the Emperor?

That was rhetorical, the answer obvious. Sloppiness.


What about that "Great Work?" How do you define the "Great Work?"


There is nothing in Masonic ritual about a 'Great Work' and I find this to be highly irrelevant to your erroneous Original Post.




edit on 3-3-2013 by AugustusMasonicus because: networkdude has no beer and it would be a great work for him to get some



posted on Mar, 3 2013 @ 02:55 PM
link   

Originally posted by EnochWasRight
Here is where it gets interesting. Seclorum is not listed in my lexicon.

Either you don't have a very good lexicon, you got fooled by the orthography (happens even to those with encyclopaedic knowledge from time to time), or you couldn't figure out the nominative singular of a plural genitive.

If you want Latin definitions, William Whittaker's Words is online and free, as is Lewis & Short, through Tufts University's Perseus Project. Perseus will even look up declined forms of words for you:


saeculum
a race, generation, age, the people of any time

seclorum noun pl neut gen



Pluribus - Is it interesting to know that this word does not appear in my lexicon.

Again, bad lexicon, or you didn't figure out the nominative singular from the ablative plural--which could happen if you weren't expecting the s->r shift from plus to plures. Look this one up in Perseus.


ibus or ubus is added to many Latin words. For instance, mulier is woman. Mulieribus is women.

Mulier is more of a wife than just any woman, who would be a femina. Mulieribus is to/for or from/by/with the wives. If you just want to say women, without indicating the word's relationship to anything else in the sentence, that would be feminae or mulieres.



posted on Mar, 3 2013 @ 03:17 PM
link   

Originally posted by FurvusRexCaeli

Originally posted by EnochWasRight
Here is where it gets interesting. Seclorum is not listed in my lexicon.

Either you don't have a very good lexicon, you got fooled by the orthography (happens even to those with encyclopaedic knowledge from time to time), or you couldn't figure out the nominative singular of a plural genitive.

If you want Latin definitions, William Whittaker's Words is online and free, as is Lewis & Short, through Tufts University's Perseus Project. Perseus will even look up declined forms of words for you:


saeculum
a race, generation, age, the people of any time

seclorum noun pl neut gen



Pluribus - Is it interesting to know that this word does not appear in my lexicon.

Again, bad lexicon, or you didn't figure out the nominative singular from the ablative plural--which could happen if you weren't expecting the s->r shift from plus to plures. Look this one up in Perseus.


ibus or ubus is added to many Latin words. For instance, mulier is woman. Mulieribus is women.

Mulier is more of a wife than just any woman, who would be a femina. Mulieribus is to/for or from/by/with the wives. If you just want to say women, without indicating the word's relationship to anything else in the sentence, that would be feminae or mulieres.


In either case, each of the two lexicons I possess do not have the two words listed. Either way I look it up, and I did, they do not appear. This is why I also looked online as well. The morphology I show is accurate to both the meaning we can see on the internet and the root meaning that originates the terms. The defensiveness of the posters here is not due to my error, but the subject I reveal. This is obvious from past threads and the posters who connect themselves to anything having to do with revealing the hidden agenda of those who are building a "New World Order."



edit on 3-3-2013 by EnochWasRight because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 3 2013 @ 03:26 PM
link   

Originally posted by EnochWasRight
In either case, each of the two lexicons I possess do not have the two words listed. Either way I look it up, and I did, they do not appear. This is why I also looked online as well. The morphology I show is accurate to both the meaning we can see on the internet and the root meaning that originates the terms.


The 'morphology' is irrelevant as the defintions have been and are what has been explained to you.


The defensiveness of the posters here is not due to my error, but the subject I reveal. This is obvious from past threads and the posters who connect themselves to anything having to do with revealing the hidden agenda of those who are building a "New World Order."


The fact that you choose to call corrections to your obviously incorrect Latin in the Original Post, 'defensive', demonstrates the paranoid agenda which you happen to adhere to in the majority of your threads. Twisting the meanings of words, as you did in your Original Post, does not support your point, it only makes you look like someone trying to bang that square peg through the round hole at every possible opportunity.



posted on Mar, 3 2013 @ 03:29 PM
link   
What do you make of these two links?

The Great Work of Speculative Freemasonry

The Great work, Quotes from 1920-1924




Originally posted by AugustusMasonicus

Originally posted by EnochWasRight
Actually, it was Pilate.


How do you confuse a Roman Prefect with the Emperor?

That was rhetorical, the answer obvious. Sloppiness.


What about that "Great Work?" How do you define the "Great Work?"


There is nothing in Masonic ritual about a 'Great Work' and I find this to be highly irrelevant to your erroneous Original Post.




edit on 3-3-2013 by AugustusMasonicus because: networkdude has no beer and it would be a great work for him to get some
edit on 3-3-2013 by EnochWasRight because: (no reason given)
edit on 3-3-2013 by EnochWasRight because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 3 2013 @ 03:35 PM
link   

Originally posted by EnochWasRight
What do you make of these two links?


Nothing.


The Great Work of Speculative Freemasonry


The first is the opinion of one Mark "Stryder" Stilwell.


The Great work, Quotes from 1920-1924


The second is from a website for the paranoid and delusional.

I stand by my earlier statement; there is no mention of a 'Great Work' in Masonic ritual. Your reference is irrelevant.



posted on Mar, 3 2013 @ 03:36 PM
link   
reply to post by AugustusMasonicus
 




The 'morphology' is irrelevant as the defintions have been and are what has been explained to you.


Not hardly. Words have a broader meaning when examining their within the context of their component parts. Simple definitions do not tell the entire story. As I have pointed out, there is more to the single word used. You call my examination in error. Your own posts have only added to what I have stated. Our history (Not to mention the conspiracies obvious on this website) confirm the context and platform I show. Attacking me has little to do with speaking to the subject presented. Attack of the object is a sure sign you have nothing to say, or you would have said it.



posted on Mar, 3 2013 @ 03:38 PM
link   
"The Grand Lodge of Virginia voted in 1800 against the establishment of a National Grand Lodge. However, it did recommend that a convention be held every three years in Washington ". . . for recommending a uniform mode of carrying on the great work of the Craft, in the different degrees of Entered Apprentice, Fellow Craft, and Master Mason."

Masonic World


Originally posted by AugustusMasonicus

Originally posted by EnochWasRight
What do you make of these two links?


Nothing.


The Great Work of Speculative Freemasonry


The first is the opinion of one Mark "Stryder" Stilwell.


The Great work, Quotes from 1920-1924


The second is from a website for the paranoid and delusional.

I stand by my earlier statement; there is no mention of a 'Great Work' in Masonic ritual. Your reference is irrelevant.



posted on Mar, 3 2013 @ 03:45 PM
link   
It seems to have a great deal to do with Scottish Rite: LINK


Originally posted by AugustusMasonicus

Originally posted by EnochWasRight
Actually, it was Pilate.


How do you confuse a Roman Prefect with the Emperor?

That was rhetorical, the answer obvious. Sloppiness.


What about that "Great Work?" How do you define the "Great Work?"


There is nothing in Masonic ritual about a 'Great Work' and I find this to be highly irrelevant to your erroneous Original Post.




edit on 3-3-2013 by AugustusMasonicus because: networkdude has no beer and it would be a great work for him to get some



posted on Mar, 3 2013 @ 03:46 PM
link   

Originally posted by EnochWasRight
Not hardly. Words have a broader meaning when examining their within the context of their component parts.


Which you did incorrectly as has been pointed out.


You call my examination in error.


ErrorS. As in plural. Glaring ones.


Your own posts have only added to what I have stated.


Yeah, by explaining what the words actually mean and where the phrases originated.


Our history (Not to mention the conspiracies obvious on this website) confirm the context and platform I show.


What history?


Attacking me has little to do with speaking to the subject presented. Attack of the object is a sure sign you have nothing to say, or you would have said it.


I completely and thoroughly addressed your flawed Original Post, as did other posters, with sources and citations. When you begin to offer blogs and paranoid websites as refutation you are worthy of being attacked for it.

Get a clue.



posted on Mar, 3 2013 @ 03:49 PM
link   

Originally posted by EnochWasRight
"The Grand Lodge of Virginia voted in 1800 against the establishment of a National Grand Lodge. However, it did recommend that a convention be held every three years in Washington ". . . for recommending a uniform mode of carrying on the great work of the Craft, in the different degrees of Entered Apprentice, Fellow Craft, and Master Mason."


*sigh*

Two things.

This is not Masonic Ritual.

And most importantly, you do notice that the words 'great work' are NOT capitalized like your ominous 'Great Work' mentions from the whack-nut websites?

It is obvious they are refering to the degree work and not some paranoid New World Order conspiracy nonsense.





new topics
top topics
 
13
<<   2  3  4 >>

log in

join