I'm a felon, I've served my time...can I have my rights back please?

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posted on Feb, 17 2013 @ 03:22 PM
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reply to post by notasdumbasyou
 


People ARE animals, genius. The only difference is, we think we are better than all the other ones while having the same urges.




posted on Feb, 17 2013 @ 03:23 PM
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reply to post by BlesUTP
 



California's laws are indeed sickening.


You guys deserve it!

You chose to live in a state with ridiculous laws.

I find it hard to sympathize…you reap what you sow. When you surround yourselves with idiots and elect idiots you get idiotic laws.

Enjoy!!



posted on Feb, 17 2013 @ 03:23 PM
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reply to post by vkey08
 





you lost those guaranteed rights when you were convicted of a felony, sorry but that's the way it goes, unless you can convince the court to vacate or expunge the charges (expunging would be easier but by no means guaranteed)


Isnt the point to limit the authority of government?

So how can they choose who they are limited against? Doesnt that defeat the purpose?

Like another poster point out earlier... the guise of terrorism can be used against anyone... should they not be protected by the Constitution and afforded the same rights as everyone else?



posted on Feb, 17 2013 @ 03:24 PM
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Originally posted by AnonyWarp



You need to be taught the difference between self defense and a violent offense?


Protip: trying to belittle people is not nice , especialy in very interesting thread, no offense


Sorry, I just really thought you didn't know the difference seeing as how you were comparing the two. I didn't realize you were trying to compare the two knowing what they both are.



posted on Feb, 17 2013 @ 03:26 PM
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reply to post by seabag
 


Exactly why I'm leaving NY. I'm actually trying to decide between Texas and Montana. I'm far from a "yankee" but I doubt you Texans would care. Although, I'm up for the challenge.



posted on Feb, 17 2013 @ 03:26 PM
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what if tomorrow they pass a law saying : wearing black pants is a crime

how many people will decide to cast the first stone, saying "OP is an animal he deserve to be caged, he wore black pants " ?



posted on Feb, 17 2013 @ 03:27 PM
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Originally posted by BlesUTP
reply to post by seabag
 


Exactly why I'm leaving NY. I'm actually trying to decide between Texas and Montana. I'm far from a "yankee" but I doubt you Texans would care. Although, I'm up for the challenge.


Come on down, brother!

Get out of the zoo!!



posted on Feb, 17 2013 @ 03:28 PM
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reply to post by AnonyWarp
 


The discrepancy between clothing and a violent offense is vast. Nobody would agree with outlawing a color of pants."Why dey gots ta be black yo?" Haha.



posted on Feb, 17 2013 @ 03:29 PM
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Just for #s and giggles i did move out of california for that reason and im also considering another move to Oregon, Texas, or Wash.

I forgot who mentioned that so i didnt respond to the actual post.



posted on Feb, 17 2013 @ 03:29 PM
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Originally posted by AnonyWarp
what if tomorrow they pass a law saying : wearing black pants is a crime

how many people will decide to cast the first stone, saying "OP is an animal he deserve to be caged, he wore black pants " ?


What a LAME analogy!


'Black pants' and 'violent crime' is a bit different, wouldn't you say?



posted on Feb, 17 2013 @ 03:29 PM
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When I lived in UK, I noticed (unless I was clearly mistaken) that once somebody had done their time for a conviction, that was it and there were no other repercussions.

I kind of side with that philosophy. The only other way to look at it is if our court system said that once somebody committed a felony then there was some sort of life sentence involved (via denial of rights), or if there are in fact penalties that go beyond the prison sentence, then obviously the prison sentence wasn't long enough.

Lifetime penalties just don't seem right to me.



posted on Feb, 17 2013 @ 03:30 PM
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reply to post by superman2012
 


ok then, no biggie.

Im just saying, i know self defense and offense are totaly different things, but let see the bigger picture

OP broke someone face, but does it make him a monster ?

i broke someone arm in self defense, i hurted someone, to protect my friend.

OP hurted someone, i hurted someone, the result is the same somehow.

The cause is different, but the result is the same, so does it make us monsters ?

OP served time in jail, because his anger spoke thru his fist,he made a mistake, but we're all able to learn from mistakes.

Makin a mistake doesnt turn you into a monster, not learning from it does.



posted on Feb, 17 2013 @ 03:32 PM
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reply to post by seabag
 


well you're right


the black pants concept looked better before i wrote it down, but i think you understand a bit what i mean, i hope



posted on Feb, 17 2013 @ 03:32 PM
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should have got a better lawyer bud all that would happen in the uk is a $200 fine or some community service its a hard knock life
you can allways get somebody to hack the court files at some sites on the internet they even advertise -play dirty back lol



posted on Feb, 17 2013 @ 03:33 PM
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reply to post by onequestion
 





Yes I admit it. I'm a Violent felon.


As a convicted felon myself I understand what your saying, but there is one right that you may get back, and that right is voting...


In all but two states, voting age citizens convicted of a felony are barred from voting for at least some period of time. Laws vary in each state, and while some restore voting rights automatically, other states permanently disenfranchise some ex-felons or require that they petition the governor or a government board to have their right restored.


www.nonprofitvote.org...

It does depend on the state you reside in.

You won't get them all back, but some are better than none.



posted on Feb, 17 2013 @ 03:33 PM
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Originally posted by dusty1
reply to post by onequestion
 


What did you do to your victim, and how exactly did you make it right with them personally?


The irony of the "justice" system. The qualm wasn't with the victim when the OP entered the courts. It was with the state.

Technically, myself, I have been a "victim" to numerous "assaults". (Rough lifestyle). In any case, I would never play the victim card. I would never testify against someone who "assaulted" me, save they broke into my home unannounced trying to rape my wife, etc.

In any case, words sometimes lead into fights. Fights sometimes lead into someone losing.

Should this be made up to the other side or the state? I am in favour of bygones being bygones. Were I truly wronged, I'd rather have civil action than state action.
edit on 17-2-2013 by boncho because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 17 2013 @ 03:33 PM
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getting meaningful employment is almost impossible for convicted felons because of the liability that employers open themselves up to by hiring them.
If an employer hires a convicted felon their liability insurance will be dropped or at the very least the cost will skyrocket,so most employers won`t hire a convicted felon.
If employers were prohibited from doing background checks then they might put their other employees and customers at risk by not knowing that the new employee is a felon and might be dangerous.
There`s no easy answer but i guess society would rather err on the side of caution and protect innocent people by limiting the rights of convicted felons.

About 25 years ago, a guy I grew up with, was charged and convicted of a felony for a property crime,since then he has never been gainfully employed, nobody wants to hire a felon. His opportunities and choices in life have been severely limited because of a foolish decision he made when he was young and drunk.
The last thing I heard about him was that he was able to weasel his way into social security and is now collecting disability.

Like I said there is no easy solution, we have to protect the law abiding people from convicted felons who might re-offend but at the same time we don`t want to be a contributing factor into their re-offending by limiting their ability to be reformed.



posted on Feb, 17 2013 @ 03:33 PM
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reply to post by AnonyWarp
 





Makin a mistake doesnt turn you into a monster, not learning from it does.


Good point. I did learn a lot on top of losing everything including my career.

To stay on topic im using my case as a catalyst for discussion im really interested in hearing people debate about the laws, hopefully present some fruitful and informative source information and even solutions and alternatives.



posted on Feb, 17 2013 @ 03:37 PM
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Originally posted by seabag

Originally posted by AnonyWarp
what if tomorrow they pass a law saying : wearing black pants is a crime

how many people will decide to cast the first stone, saying "OP is an animal he deserve to be caged, he wore black pants " ?


What a LAME analogy!


'Black pants' and 'violent crime' is a bit different, wouldn't you say?


Ask yourself how many people have been charged with assaulting an officer because they simply laid the charges to protect themselves after beating a suspect themselves. It's well documented in the news and court proceedings. I'm not labelling all police here, but it does happen.

In that sense..


There can be "violent crime" when no crime has taken place.

And in many other circumstances as well.

I think the point that should be made, is that no punishment beyond what the state has set out should be legal. Whether it be denial of service, rights, freedoms, employment, etc.

The only case where I see this to raise concern is sex offenders in the field of work that involves children. Beyond that, people really need to move on with their lives and let others do the same.



posted on Feb, 17 2013 @ 03:40 PM
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reply to post by Tardacus
 


Companies that hire felons can also get TJTC ( Targeted jobs tax credits ). I once managed for a company that preferred hiring felons, welfare and SS recipients, and resident aliens - because of the free Federal $$$ that they got for doing so.

Oh, and those groups also never complain about being scheduled part time, low pay, or being on call 24/7 even though they're part time. Another "benefit" to the Corporate system.






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