Help ATS with a contribution via PayPal:
learn more

I'm a felon, I've served my time...can I have my rights back please?

page: 5
57
<< 2  3  4    6  7  8 >>

log in

join

posted on Feb, 17 2013 @ 03:40 PM
link   
post removed because the user has no concept of manners

Click here for more information.




posted on Feb, 17 2013 @ 03:40 PM
link   
reply to post by lynxpilot
 


No, in the UK, all crimes are on your record for life.

After 5 years (most crimes, not sure about more serious ones, ie murder), you don't have to tell an employer about it.....except certain roles where there is no expiry on it:- Working for the Government, working with children or vulnerable adults, working in the nuclear industry etc etc.......those types of job your criminal record will follow you for life.



posted on Feb, 17 2013 @ 03:41 PM
link   
reply to post by CheckPointCharlie
 


It only gets expunged from PUBLIC record. It is still on your record and you will never own a firearm, legally.



posted on Feb, 17 2013 @ 03:45 PM
link   
reply to post by onequestion
 



hopefully present some fruitful and informative source information and even solutions and alternatives.


Here's one way...not sure what state you're in but maybe this route is worth looking into.


How does a Felon Get Their Rights Back?

Glad you asked...

In order for a felon to have their rights reinstated, he or she must first not be under any form of supervision, i.e. parole. Submit a Restoration of Civil Rights Application with the local clemency board along with any letters of reference or character affidavits. Keep copies of completed application, letters, and other correspondence. Be aware that the process is long and involved and is not guaranteed to be successful.


Source

Maybe search "Restoration of Civil Rights Application" followed by whatever State you're in, see if that is an option.



posted on Feb, 17 2013 @ 03:46 PM
link   
reply to post by onequestion
 


Emotions are elements of our personality.

You can change your demeanor through therapy, meditation, counseling, and other avenues.

Not committing another crime for the rest of your life is only one way to prove your rehabilitation.

Whether I agree or not with Alcoholics Anonymous, or anger management counseling, the state believes that both can rehabilitate an individual from behavior deemed criminal or deviant. The same applies to you.

You can take active steps to prove a journey from the type of person which caused you to commit your crime, to the "new you."

Saying that you are a "citizen" and as such, deserve the rights of every other citizen is not enough.

What about the citizen you hurt? Their right to not be hurt by you was violated. The state cannot just say: "we locked him up for a bit, then let him go; you're all healed now, right?"

What if you had been the one hurt, would you accept that the offender deserved the right to carry a gun, just because he had been a citizen? Or would you want some kind of proof that he wasn't just going to take that gun and hurt someone else?

As for terrorism, that's a premeditated act. If you premeditated what you did, then I am adding another stone to the side of "don't let him have all his rights back." Anyone who can sit down, plan to hurt someone else, and follow through with the heinous act, and then demand they be treated as any other normal, friendly, nonviolent citizen, definitely doesn't deserve those rights.

I certainly hope what you did was neither planned, nor considered an act of terrorism. I would hope what you did was accountable to a momentary loss of control, a basic flaw in being human, one which you can come back from by teaching yourself to be better.

~ Wandering Scribe



posted on Feb, 17 2013 @ 03:47 PM
link   
reply to post by UberL33t
 


Wow thanks.



posted on Feb, 17 2013 @ 03:50 PM
link   
reply to post by Wandering Scribe
 


Ok i get where your coming from now.



As for terrorism, that's a premeditated act. If you premeditated what you did, then I am adding another stone to the side of "don't let him have all his rights back." Anyone who can sit down, plan to hurt someone else, and follow through with the heinous act, and then demand they be treated as any other normal, friendly, nonviolent citizen, definitely doesn't deserve those rights.


Nah i would never hurt someone unless it was either fight or flight or during an extremely explosive and high stress situation. Even then i wouldnt really hurt anyone you know what i mean, i would do what i had to though, as would anyone.



posted on Feb, 17 2013 @ 03:53 PM
link   

Originally posted by woogleuk
reply to post by lynxpilot
 


No, in the UK, all crimes are on your record for life.

After 5 years (most crimes, not sure about more serious ones, ie murder), you don't have to tell an employer about it.....except certain roles where there is no expiry on it:- Working for the Government, working with children or vulnerable adults, working in the nuclear industry etc etc.......those types of job your criminal record will follow you for life.


Thanks for that. Good info. At least there's some recourse though. Here (US) it's a life sentence.



posted on Feb, 17 2013 @ 03:54 PM
link   
reply to post by AnonyWarp
 


When you commit a crime with a victim that is not yourself, more than your beliefs come into play. I have committed no crime, and hurt no one in a way which the law deems criminal or violent. I can say that I am not a criminal, because nothing I have done suggests otherwise.

The OP has a record. He now has a history of committing violent crimes. He may never do so again for the rest of his life, and if so: wonderful. I don't think the OP is a bad person.

But the fact still remains: someone else, who is not the OP, now has to bear the effects of the OP's actions. Just because the OP says he isn't going to hurt anyone, doesn't mean he won't, history proves that he can, has, and just might.

Which is why the state needs a way to prove rehabilitation. So both the victim, and the public at large, know that the OP will most likely not commit anymore crimes.

~ Wandering Scribe



posted on Feb, 17 2013 @ 03:56 PM
link   
Sorry.....

As I always say, to bad ignorance isn't painful. In this case it is. That being said, you will continue to be punished for your "mistake" for some time. However, you can call the clerk of courts and find out how you can have your crime expunged from your record.



posted on Feb, 17 2013 @ 03:57 PM
link   
Sucks to learn the hard way that hurting people might have consequences.

Not everyone fails this test.
edit on 17-2-2013 by loam because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 17 2013 @ 03:58 PM
link   

Originally posted by BlesUTP
No, you should not have any of your rights back.

You were convicted of a felony which is considered breaking a "social contract", not a misdemeanor or a violation. If your get your rights back that sets up a precedent to give rights back to thousands of criminals. What makes you so special? Would give rights back to a serial rapist? A murder? A child molester? I would certainly hope not.

Life is not fair. You don't have to like that fact or even accept it. But if you were serious about getting any of your rights back, like voting, you should be doing research instead of throwing a pity party on a public forum.

Man up.


No need to be so harsh on the poor fellow, as he said, he paid his dues and learned from his mistakes. In fact he was in prison, not a very nice place, and the irony is now he is walking "free" with the similar limitations as a prison. If you have any sense of empathy you might realize that people in all forms are internally sensitive creatures and their could be more reasons than just an pure act of impulse that my explain violence. Besides comparing his actions with the likings of serial rapists and murderers is like comparing the shot of a bb gun against a 45cal. Maybe just the reaction of a guilty conscious on your behalf. May I quote the words of a very popular figure that has been making waves in the past millennium. " He who is without sin, cast the first stone"



posted on Feb, 17 2013 @ 03:59 PM
link   
reply to post by onequestion
 


And I consider fight-or-flight to be biological, instinctive. That's the kind of crime where we can seek to better ourselves, and make up for the damage we have caused. I'm really not the kind of person who believes in zero tolerance when it comes to crime. I know people can change, if they are put on the right path, and have people alongside who believe in them. Which is also why I don't necessarily agree with prison terms. There are better ways to deal with crimes of passion I think.

~ Wandering Scribe



posted on Feb, 17 2013 @ 04:01 PM
link   
reply to post by Wandering Scribe


But the fact still remains: someone else, who is not the OP, now has to bear the effects of the OP's actions. Just because the OP says he isn't going to hurt anyone, doesn't mean he won't, history proves that he can, has, and just might.

Which is why the state needs a way to prove rehabilitation. So both the victim, and the public at large, know that the OP will most likely not commit anymore crimes.

 



The fact remains that not ever crime is prosecuted. Therefore, the justice system in its directive, is a failure. A victim can be a predator. Depending on how the system is manipulated.



posted on Feb, 17 2013 @ 04:03 PM
link   
reply to post by FreeThinkerbychoice
 


I have empathy, but let's review here.

What is the OP complaining about? He can't vote....own firearms...get a job that requires a background check...or *might* be treated differently by LE?

None of those are show stoppers, imo. Moreover, he can probably live quite well without any of it.

I wonder how much inconvenience that represents compared to the damage sustained by his victims?



edit on 17-2-2013 by loam because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 17 2013 @ 04:06 PM
link   
reply to post by loam
 


Just so you know my victim got a black eye.

Im angry because of the fact that i cant go hunting with my family. Im also angry because of the way i get treat during a routine traffic stop.

Its a game changer when im looking for employment. Which is a life changer.



posted on Feb, 17 2013 @ 04:08 PM
link   
reply to post by onequestion
 


Black eyes generally don't net felony assault convictions unless there's more to it.
edit on 17-2-2013 by loam because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 17 2013 @ 04:09 PM
link   


None of those are show stoppers, imo. Moreover, he can probably live quite well without any of it.


Those are not show stoppers, i do agree, but OP served his time in jail, law have to be equal and just for everyone.

If the law doesnt give his rights back.

Law and justice is sensed to show us how to play by the rules, if the law itself dont show the exemple to follow and break its own rules, how are we sensed to respect it ?

Because its not a show stopper, OP is sensed to sit and say "oh ok,i guess its still alright" ?



posted on Feb, 17 2013 @ 04:10 PM
link   
reply to post by loam
 


Theres not, he had a broken cheek bone but it literally resulted in a black eye and no further medical treatment. As i said before i was registered with california state athletic comissioned as a professional fighter which came out during the case.

Also as i said before i am providing details not to justify anything but only as a catalyst for debate.

Im not trying to say i was innocent.



posted on Feb, 17 2013 @ 04:13 PM
link   
reply to post by Hopechest
 





You can't have your cake and eat it too.

. .. unless you're a politician.





new topics

top topics



 
57
<< 2  3  4    6  7  8 >>

log in

join