Author of "American Sniper" among the dead at Rough Creek

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posted on Feb, 3 2013 @ 08:05 PM
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reply to post by NarrowGate
 

exactly hipaa is one of the corner stones of our medical rights and thats why its kind of hard to by carte Blanche deny the rights of the mentally ill as in most cases no one would have the ability to find out who is mentally ill,add in them being a federally protected class of people in the united states and all this talk of denying them the right to bear arms gets seen in a new light. another example of protected class would be gay/lesbian/transgender people, we cant pass laws making them unable to own fire arms so why would it legal to deny another protected class(the mentally ill/disabled)? and to those that say we all ready deny felons(and some misdemeanor offenders) this right well felons are not a protected class......


and just to avoid confusion i am in support of gay/lesbian/trans rights and did not want to come off as seeming hostile to them
edit on 3-2-2013 by RalagaNarHallas because: clarify a point




posted on Feb, 3 2013 @ 08:16 PM
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reply to post by RalagaNarHallas
 


Still the question remains...there are people that are truly unfit to own firearms. How do we identify them? Past that, how do we spread the message of gun safety better. There are too many accidents.

HIPPA must not be violated.

We can not rely on hearsay of people with grudges or whatever...

What do we do? It is a tough question.



posted on Feb, 3 2013 @ 08:18 PM
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Originally posted by MidnightTide
reply to post by guymontag
 


He was in a combat situation and he took down those who threatened his fellow soldiers. End of story, I would have done the same.


--------------------------------------------------------------'


As to the situation, he was shot a an upscale lodge, not a firing range.

www.yourglenrosetx.com...


I have no other details about why this happened, though I have read that there maybe was a bounty on his head.


As an American with friends in the military, I understand that soldiers must do what it takes to save lives. However, he made a big deal about all the people he killed, bragged about it, and seemed to revel in the notoriety of having killed 160 people.

Any normal soldier wouldn't revel in death. It's just something that they would have to do. They wouldn't brag about how many deaths they have caused, as if it was some kind of video game high score. I know many soldiers who, no matter how many people they had to take out, having to kill another human being took a part of them away. That's what killing does. It takes part(s) of you away that are nearly impossible to get back.

This man felt the need to get those parts back by acting like he was some great big action hero sniper.

I'm not saying he deserved this, nobody does. Nor am I saying karma is some kind of judgement system and/or is quick. But the universe tends to unfold in a particular way.

I feel terrible for his family, and the families of the other victim and the suspect.



posted on Feb, 3 2013 @ 08:27 PM
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160 confirmed reasons...



posted on Feb, 3 2013 @ 08:46 PM
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reply to post by lnfideI
 





He was a true American hero. Hats off to him and condolences to his family.



What a joke.......
edit on 3-2-2013 by WaterBottle because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 3 2013 @ 08:49 PM
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Originally posted by ManjushriPrajna

Originally posted by MidnightTide
reply to post by guymontag
 


Any normal soldier wouldn't revel in death. It's just something that they would have to do. They wouldn't brag about how many deaths they have caused, as if it was some kind of video game high score. I know many soldiers who, no matter how many people they had to take out, having to kill another human being took a part of them away. That's what killing does. It takes part(s) of you away that are nearly impossible to get back.


I can see what you are saying here, but he is dead now. Judgment is not ours.

I do not know how much he bragged, and do not care. Everyone makes mistakes, and he might have lost quite a few friends over there fighting terrorists who are literally evil. We do not know the circumstances of his life and to pass judgment on a man who fought for our freedom is wrong.

I have never read anything by him, and do not care. He is dead now, and I think we should just be thankful we did not have to do the killing. Our freedom was and still is paid for in blood. That is my take on it, from my perspective of someone who never fought overseas.
edit on 3-2-2013 by NarrowGate because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 3 2013 @ 08:52 PM
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Originally posted by WaterBottle
What goes around, comes around.

Don't feel bad for him one second.


Yes. This man killed so many people and he boasted of his achievement as something to be proud of. I remember thinking at the time I came across the story that I was looking forward to his day coming.



posted on Feb, 3 2013 @ 08:53 PM
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Originally posted by Witness123

Originally posted by WaterBottle
What goes around, comes around.

Don't feel bad for him one second.


Yes. This man killed so many people and he boasted of his achievement as something to be proud of. I remember thinking at the time I came across the story that I was looking forward to his day coming.


You have judged yourself here, not him.



posted on Feb, 3 2013 @ 09:17 PM
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Originally posted by evc1shop
reply to post by Swills
 

It could be the perfect framing for mental stability, psychiatrist note needed for gun purchase kind of law to be worked into the system. Why give a PTSD sufferer a gun on a range or not? Well, if he legally purchased it prior to his ailment and he has done nothing wrong, he woudl be within his rights to keep owning it. Now if every soldir that came back from a tour was checked for mental fitness and one were found unstable, under some new law, perhaps they would try to remove his weapons since he could be viewed as a danger to himself and others.
I know it is far fetched.... just tryign to make sense of it



Honnestly, I don't believe there is a conspiracy to "go after our guns", but I'm not certain there isn't either. If there is, well, the legitimate concern of vets suffering PTSD having guns could easily become pretext for ensuring nobody with US Military combat training/experience has weapons in case of a mass uprising where vets might side with the "rebels"...while it might not be reality, or the most likely scenario, I wouldn't say your idea is all that far fetched. Again, it may not be, but it is a logical line of thinking, and so it could just as easily be reality as not



posted on Feb, 3 2013 @ 09:23 PM
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Originally posted by Witness123

Originally posted by WaterBottle
What goes around, comes around.

Don't feel bad for him one second.


Yes. This man killed so many people and he boasted of his achievement as something to be proud of. I remember thinking at the time I came across the story that I was looking forward to his day coming.


Sick mindset - even if you feel what he did (the killing, boasting, or both) was wrong, its a pretty scumbaggy thing to look forward to someone's death. Just my opinion.



posted on Feb, 3 2013 @ 10:20 PM
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When you think about it, this man racked up kills killing people (civilians) trying to defend their country.
Trying to oust invaders. And he brags about this?


This lady was defending her country:


Lyudmila Mykhailivna Pavlichenko (Ukrainian: Людмила Михайлівна Павліченко; Russian: Людмила Михайловна Павличенко Lyudmila Mikhailovna Pavlichenko; July 12, 1916 – October 10, 1974) was a Soviet sniper during World War II. Credited with 309 kills, she is regarded as the most successful female sniper in history.


This is worth bragging about. She killed armed invading soldiers.



posted on Feb, 3 2013 @ 10:22 PM
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Sad to say but judging on how he stirred up some trouble promoting his book he may have just that, had it coming in the long run. If not from the suspect, due to probably angering other people, a similar situation may have happened. Unfortunately fate catches up in the end. No even to mention seemed like he pushed the limits bringing a person with that PTSD into a risky scenario.



posted on Feb, 3 2013 @ 10:24 PM
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Originally posted by FoosM
When you think about it, this man racked up kills killing people (civilians) trying to defend their country.
Trying to oust invaders. And he brags about this?


This lady was defending her country:


Lyudmila Mykhailivna Pavlichenko (Ukrainian: Людмила Михайлівна Павліченко; Russian: Людмила Михайловна Павличенко Lyudmila Mikhailovna Pavlichenko; July 12, 1916 – October 10, 1974) was a Soviet sniper during World War II. Credited with 309 kills, she is regarded as the most successful female sniper in history.


This is worth bragging about. She killed armed invading soldiers.





Indeed. Named my Mosin-Nagant after her.



posted on Feb, 3 2013 @ 10:25 PM
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My first thought - "what comes around goes around." The PTSD shooter that he was mentoring may have seen him as part of the problem. He was praised in the press as a super hero because of his kill record. Snipers are usually know to be very quiet about the number of people they have taken out and are hardly ever given to calling attention to themselves in that way. He had a job to do and he did it well. Does that make his actions heroic? Hardly.



posted on Feb, 3 2013 @ 10:37 PM
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First I want to say I am partial to Texans, fellow Texans and fellow Servicemen who like "Me and Mine" sought to serve our country by serving in our U S Military and I am sorry to hear Chris Kyle and another Texan were murdered while attempting to help a fellow veteran.

These formalities having been touched upon and having my own crosses to bare for my role and victims while I served in the U S Marine Corp., I have a serious problem admiring and glamorizing "Murder From Cover", e.g. shooting what is claimed to be and may in fact be the killing of an enemy at long range and apparently Chris Kyle was one of or the best, as Kyle (probably named after my uncle Kyle Rote or maybe Todd) claims to have shot and killed 255 enemy combatants of which 160 were confirmed kills.

Put simply, my brain has a hard time admiring someone who was a mass murderer. I have no doubt that not all of those he shot and killed at long distance, as is what "Snipers" do were armed threats and am reminded of the raw footage of Collateral Murder - Wikileaks - Iraq


What a murderous species we are.

And for those who have brought up the Osama Bin Laden assassination; Bin Laden aka CIA Asset "Tim Osman" died in the mountains of Tora Bora sometime around the 13th of December, 2001 and if that was Bin Laden the Navy Buried at Sea it was a "Frozen Popsicle".

Chances are the man Obama claims credit for having killed was the Double the CIA had be trying to feed us for the past 11 years and counting.


Wake Up !
edit on 4-2-2013 by MajorKarma because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 3 2013 @ 10:44 PM
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Originally posted by Swills
reply to post by goou111
 


Whoa whoa whoa.... this is the same Chris Kyle who also wrote in his book he punched Jesse Ventura in a San Diego SEAL bar back in 06. Ventura cried foul and was suing him. The trial was supposed to really kick off in a few months but now he is dead?

Wow, wtf? Shot by a Marine who had PTSD? Why would you take anyone with PSTD to a shooting range? From what I can find so far there was a charity event for veterans so that explains why he was the range with disable vets. Still, terrible place to be for those with mental issues.

Top Navy SEAL sniper killed on gun range of West Texas resort


www.star-telegram.com...


Chris Kyle, a retired Navy SEAL with the highest number of confirmed kills, was fatally shot Saturday along with another man on the gun range of Rough Creek Lodge, a posh resort just west of Glen Rose, Erath County Sheriff Tommy Bryant said.

The 25-year-old suspect was apprehended about five hours later in Lancaster, southeast of Dallas, more than 70 miles from the scene, Bryant said.

The suspect, identified as Eddie Ray Routh, 25, was pursued to a house in Lancaster by officers, including a local SWAT team. Routh again try to flee in a vehicle but was stopped after spikes were laid across a road, Bryant said.

"The suspect has been caught and is in custody in Lancaster," the sheriff said. Erath County sheriff's investigators and Texas Rangers were securing a capital murder warrant.

Witnesses told sheriff's investigators that the gunman opened fire on the two men around 3:30 p.m., then fled in a pickup truck belonging to one of the victims.

The motive of the shooting remained unclear, he said. "Not a clue; absolutely no idea."

An unconfirmed report suggested that Routh had been on the range with Kyle and the other man, and they might have been acquainted.

In January 2012, the Cleburne Times-Review reported that Eddie Ray Routh of Lancaster was arrested in Johnson county on a DWI charge.

edit on 2-2-2013 by Swills because: (no reason given)



Ventura said he was being 'set up' and that was why he took it to court knowing he was going to win. Maybe some did not want anything getting out in the court of public record.



posted on Feb, 3 2013 @ 11:30 PM
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www.mediaite.com... ain-former-navy-seal-sniper-chris-kyle-talks-gun-violence-in-recent-interview/

?



posted on Feb, 4 2013 @ 12:16 AM
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reply to post by eLPresidente
 


lol?

Like what? Who cares if he punched Ventura or not? It's not relevant.



posted on Feb, 4 2013 @ 12:38 AM
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Originally posted by lacrimaererum
reply to post by Bedlam
 


ah ok.

you reckon this story is really the MSM trying to get vets disarmed.

i don't know how you can make it any simpler.

you give a person with mental illness a gun and he shots dead the best sniper in the country.

and now your afraid the media will use this story to try and disarm vets.

i think the truth is that the universe is trying to send warnings to the country of america that it is on the edge of a cliff and if it don't take a step back very quickly its about to fall into an abyss of violence. how much longer can america ignore these warnings before anarchy and chaos breaks out.


just out of curiosity, how do you propose that we stop this country from falling into an abyss of violence?

if your plan is detailed, i will read it. don't hold anything back.



posted on Feb, 4 2013 @ 01:45 AM
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I wonder how it feels to serve three combat deployments over several years and come home to read the kind of vile trash some people are posting?

I have to say, I'd much rather live in a society with those returning vets, PTSD or not than one dominated by the kind of self entitled immaturity that makes some leftist blame soldiers for doing their duty. Too bad we can't ship them off to live in their far left Utopia with the Taliban and other "oppressed" freedom fighters they clearly support and sympathize with.

When you serve in combat your quality as a person and where you stand in that small group is well known. You earn every ounce of respect or lose it accordingly. You sacrifice everything for the freedoms other people waste or use for idiotic purposes, sometimes die for them. It's no surprise that same minority who takes your service for granted also calls you a violent, criminal person who needs to be feared and restricted.

I've seen some pretty foolish crap on ATS over the years but I'm blown away at how many and how often the short bus stops are occurring in this thread.
edit on 4-2-2013 by ecoparity because: (no reason given)





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