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15 Foods you can regrow from scraps!

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posted on Nov, 5 2012 @ 05:10 PM
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Originally posted by fnpmitchreturns
I was poking around and saw this article about regrowing food from scraps. My thought that if the SHTF and we lose power for a long period and the weather permitting e person might be able to grow some food out of left over scraps found?

indianinthemachine.wordpress.com...




Various plants (in no particular order) that you can regrow from the food you already have! Woot! Way to reuse and recycle! I constantly have green onions and celery growing. (And potatoes/sweet potatoes but that just because they decided to do that in my pantry) Do you guys regrow any of your food?


Apples
tomatoes
potatoes/sweet potatoes
onions
garlic
pumpkin
ginger
bok choy
carrots
celery

and more ...

if it is rotted and not edible .... regrow it!


Most all vegetables can be grown from their seeds if they are removed carefully and dried EXCEPT for GMO Vegetables,many of which are sterile to my experience.
edit on 5-11-2012 by MajorKarma because: (no reason given)




posted on Nov, 6 2012 @ 02:23 AM
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reply to post by dizTheWiz
 

Found sample pages of the book "Don't Throw It, Grow It! 68 Windowsill Plants from Kitchen Scraps" by Deborah Peterson & Millicent Selsam that includes table of contents, index, and the entry for Sweet Potato: www.scribd.com...

Did not find an ebook version. Print versions can be found at this Amazon link.



posted on Nov, 6 2012 @ 02:37 AM
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I can't wait until spring.

We planted our first garden this year.

Pumpkins are out. They take up way to much room and we only got a few. The plant took over half the yard.

I am going to focus more on zucchini, squash, tomatoes, and broccoli. We had good luck with them.

Watch out for the darn zucchini grub worms though. They are devistating.

I also liked my peppers, although I think I am going to leave the hot Cheyenne(if that is right) peppers out this year.

It is fun to do a garden. MY gf got all crazy and selfish about it though...lol

We were literally giving tomatoes to the neighbors. We were overwhelmed for a while. I think next spring we are going to attempt to can a few. Never done it so I hope it works out.
edit on 6-11-2012 by liejunkie01 because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 6 2012 @ 02:48 AM
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reply to post by liejunkie01
 


Tomatoe Jam is delicious and if you have them to spare why not??



posted on Nov, 6 2012 @ 08:21 AM
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reply to post by fnpmitchreturns
 


I knew about some of these and then there are some I didn't know about.
I'd also add Papaya, lemon, orange, grapefruit, melons and squash (Acorn and butternut) Which I have actually grown from. These of course the oranges and papaya and such would be for the tropical areas.



posted on Nov, 6 2012 @ 08:23 AM
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Originally posted by TFCJay
I was really hoping to see T-Bones on that list.


You'll have to raise a calf for that lol



posted on Apr, 5 2013 @ 03:58 AM
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Originally posted by fnpmitchreturns
Apples
tomatoes
potatoes/sweet potatoes
onions
garlic
pumpkin
ginger
bok choy
carrots
celery


I'd like to offer some clarity with this list:

-Apples/oranges/etc fruit TREES: These sorts of long lived specimens generally take 7 years to bear fruit, and all too often the choice cultivars we're used to nabbing from the store or hybrids. Meaning you might not even get fruit from resulting trees, might get the one you bargained for, or something else entirety (from one seed to the next). With these sorts, I advice its worth it to pay the money and get the proper, grafted trees from local suppliers. When it comes to fruit TREES, and seeds, I only grow from seeds when its stuff to rare 'proper' specimens arent anywhere near here / cost too damn much to get them all. But with the common stuff, like citrus, I get proper specimens. Another issue here is, whatever you end up with, assuming it even bears, you dont know WHEN it will bear (the part of year). I cant speak to apples, but with citrus, if you select your cultivars right, you can have fresh fruit every month of year (except August). I have 15 different citrus cultivars with this facet as the main reason.

-Tomatoes: Its best if you hunt down some heirloom tomatoes to take your seeds from. 'Common' tomatoes might just give you perfectly good and 'like' results, but you never know. If they're non-complex hybrids (of anything) you might get 2 different results in addition to the fruit you bought. You may or may not be able to tell any major differences between them. Of course you can isolate each variant. Tomatoes are pretty good about not too easily cross pollinating between different cultivars. I can say I've had all good results from the seeds of store bought (related) peppers. Peppers I know are amongst the easiest of plants to derive solid cultivars from.

-P's: Potatoes etc are groundcrops and will tend to stay 'perennial' assuming you dont completely remove all their various portions from the ground. Sweet Potatoes (Ipomea) are tropical rootcrop plants that can be grown annual, but are extremely unrelated to 'potatoes'. With P's you can plant the entire 'tubers', or you can get them moist and carve out the 'eyes' (germplasms) that begin to form on them, and plant separately. Doing it that way means less or no 'food' for wouldbe insect marauders.

-Onions: All onions/garlics can be planted directly, or even better all the onions you go thru you can cut off the bottom portion (with dead looking root materials) and plant those, and most likely get new ones growing that way. WIth green onions its the same story: but the one catch a lot of people nto realize is when you're growing them NEVER uproot them, cut just off the above ground portion, and they'll grow back. At the store they're complete, becuase the top portions wont survive commercial life without being complete with the germplasm. Garlic seem to be more finickier, so I always plant the cloves whole.

-Pumpkins / squashes /etc: Quite often have perfectly good seeds. Also quite often is they're harvested (squashes mainly) well before the seeds can mature. The solution is to let it sit out as long as it can, and allow is seeds to mature.

-Bok choy: I got some baby bok's once and stuck into glass of water trick. They didnt root for me, but they did manage to keep themselves alive long enough to make flowers.



posted on Apr, 5 2013 @ 06:21 AM
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reply to post by fnpmitchreturns
 


Watermelons too............



posted on Apr, 5 2013 @ 12:33 PM
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reply to post by fnpmitchreturns
 


Don't forget pineapple, though a hell of a wait....





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