15 Foods you can regrow from scraps!

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posted on Nov, 3 2012 @ 12:06 PM
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I was poking around and saw this article about regrowing food from scraps. My thought that if the SHTF and we lose power for a long period and the weather permitting e person might be able to grow some food out of left over scraps found?

indianinthemachine.wordpress.com...




Various plants (in no particular order) that you can regrow from the food you already have! Woot! Way to reuse and recycle! I constantly have green onions and celery growing. (And potatoes/sweet potatoes but that just because they decided to do that in my pantry) Do you guys regrow any of your food?


Apples
tomatoes
potatoes/sweet potatoes
onions
garlic
pumpkin
ginger
bok choy
carrots
celery

and more ...

if it is rotted and not edible .... regrow it!




posted on Nov, 3 2012 @ 12:09 PM
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reply to post by fnpmitchreturns
 


Good information and a timely reminder.



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posted on Nov, 3 2012 @ 12:16 PM
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I was really hoping to see T-Bones on that list.



posted on Nov, 3 2012 @ 12:20 PM
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Thanks for that info. This is the kind of stuff we should be learning asap....if you know what I mean.



posted on Nov, 3 2012 @ 12:31 PM
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Originally posted by fnpmitchreturns
I was poking around and saw this article about regrowing food from scraps. My thought that if the SHTF and we lose power for a long period and the weather permitting e person might be able to grow some food out of left over scraps found?

indianinthemachine.wordpress.com...




Various plants (in no particular order) that you can regrow from the food you already have! Woot! Way to reuse and recycle! I constantly have green onions and celery growing. (And potatoes/sweet potatoes but that just because they decided to do that in my pantry) Do you guys regrow any of your food?


Apples
tomatoes
potatoes/sweet potatoes
onions
garlic
pumpkin
ginger
bok choy
carrots
celery

and more ...

if it is rotted and not edible .... regrow it!


Good post op, I will be saving this thread as I have recently had some success growing garlic from some old cloves, and it seems to be handling the UK winter quite well so far without me doing anything to it.



posted on Nov, 3 2012 @ 12:45 PM
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Since i recentley found out my pit mix puppy likes to eat pumpkin, i am anticipating the pumpkin patch in my backyard next year.



posted on Nov, 3 2012 @ 12:46 PM
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reply to post by fnpmitchreturns
 


My husband grew celery, potatoes, sweet potatoes, onion, and garlic this summer, all from scraps.

Nice



posted on Nov, 3 2012 @ 12:55 PM
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This is not about regrowing but sort of
My late aunt used to make soured whole milk, she didn´t empty the soured whole milk jar completely, she left 2 tea spoonful of that milk there as a root and filled rest of the jar with milk, left it on room temperature for a day and next day it was ready.



posted on Nov, 3 2012 @ 02:17 PM
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Originally posted by dollukka
This is not about regrowing but sort of
My late aunt used to make soured whole milk, she didn´t empty the soured whole milk jar completely, she left 2 tea spoonful of that milk there as a root and filled rest of the jar with milk, left it on room temperature for a day and next day it was ready.


What do you use soured whole milk for?



posted on Nov, 3 2012 @ 02:19 PM
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Pineapple... Cut the green top off and plant, and in 3 WHOLE YEARS you may have another pineapple to eat



posted on Nov, 3 2012 @ 02:38 PM
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Originally posted by tinker9917

Originally posted by dollukka
This is not about regrowing but sort of
My late aunt used to make soured whole milk, she didn´t empty the soured whole milk jar completely, she left 2 tea spoonful of that milk there as a root and filled rest of the jar with milk, left it on room temperature for a day and next day it was ready.


What do you use soured whole milk for?

It's edible, and it's healthy for stomach, getting along with any pastry

Dollukka thx for the reminder, it's kind of forgotten recipe
edit on 3-11-2012 by zilebeliveunknown because: (no reason given)
edit on 3-11-2012 by zilebeliveunknown because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 3 2012 @ 03:53 PM
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I did this with some tomatoes. Threw them out in the yard 2 months an ago. And now I already have new ones just starting grow on the plants. I live in socal and you can grow them during the fall here... Got them growing right next to my ummm medication.



posted on Nov, 3 2012 @ 07:11 PM
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Originally posted by fnpmitchreturns
I was poking around and saw this article about regrowing food from scraps. My thought that if the SHTF and we lose power for a long period and the weather permitting e person might be able to grow some food out of left over scraps found?

indianinthemachine.wordpress.com...




Various plants (in no particular order) that you can regrow from the food you already have! Woot! Way to reuse and recycle! I constantly have green onions and celery growing. (And potatoes/sweet potatoes but that just because they decided to do that in my pantry) Do you guys regrow any of your food?


Apples
tomatoes
potatoes/sweet potatoes
onions
garlic
pumpkin
ginger
bok choy
carrots
celery

and more ...

if it is rotted and not edible .... regrow it!


This is a good idea, but let's be practical. You do not grow an 'apple' from seeds unless you've got several years to wait and a place for the tree.

I'm a seed saver. I grow almost all of our vegetables from seeds I've saved from the previous year's garden. But what you really need to concentrate on, if there is going to be a shortage of food is the plants that will give you a lot of food in a short time, no? Think first of sprouts like mung bean, broccoli, cress, and alfalfa. You can have a ton of fresh veggies in a few days on any sunny windowsill. Then, think the 'cut and come again' crops like lettuces, kale, spinach and chard. Most of these are pretty easy to grow from seed, but you can't get the seeds from a rotting plant in the refrigerator. Good reason to have some on hand.

As far as re-growing a carrot from one in the frig...why? It's kind of like replanting one onion. Yeah, it might sprout, but why do you wish to resprout the bulb? You eat the bulb. You eat the carrot root. It's like a radish. It's a one trick pony, folks.

If you're going to plant pumpkins, you need a LOT of space and they take from spring until fall to give you what? A few pumpkins. Which rot pretty fast. Better use of limited space would be to grow butternut squash which lasts for up to 6 months after harvest. It's a nice thing to store for the winter. Washing and drying seeds from them is easy.

And those of you who like the idea of a winter garden, you can winter over kale and chard and carrots (the kind you planted from seed in the spring). We will have fresh kale any time we want it all winter, even under snow. And now it is still not too late in the north to plant your garlic crop for next year. It needs to go in NOW so it can be ready for harvest by the next summer.

It's cool to experiment with the veggies you have in the refrigerator to see what they can do. It's fun to watch seeds sprout. We eat a lot of avocados and the compost pile is a thicket of doomed avocado trees right now. LOL But if you're interested in growing food that will actually make a difference for you and your family, 'dig' deeper and choose wisely what you plant.



posted on Nov, 3 2012 @ 07:13 PM
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I mean no disrespect but the appreciation for a thread like this just shows how long we have been disconnected from Mother Nature. The fact that people have to reminded of these things scares me :S I think we are screwed if we are bound for a big catastrophe.

Star for you anyway, because maybe this information will provide help.



posted on Nov, 3 2012 @ 07:14 PM
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Originally posted by zilebeliveunknown

Originally posted by tinker9917

Originally posted by dollukka
This is not about regrowing but sort of
My late aunt used to make soured whole milk, she didn´t empty the soured whole milk jar completely, she left 2 tea spoonful of that milk there as a root and filled rest of the jar with milk, left it on room temperature for a day and next day it was ready.


What do you use soured whole milk for?

It's edible, and it's healthy for stomach, getting along with any pastry

Dollukka thx for the reminder, it's kind of forgotten recipe
edit on 3-11-2012 by zilebeliveunknown because: (no reason given)
edit on 3-11-2012 by zilebeliveunknown because: (no reason given)


Sounds like yogurt. Or buttermilk. Did she heat the milk first before she cultured it?



posted on Nov, 3 2012 @ 07:36 PM
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Originally posted by OnWhiteMars
I mean no disrespect but the appreciation for a thread like this just shows how long we have been disconnected from Mother Nature. The fact that people have to reminded of these things scares me :S I think we are screwed if we are bound for a big catastrophe.

Star for you anyway, because maybe this information will provide help.


You are so right ... we are so spoiled by our modern culture that we have lost touch with Mother Nature ....

Today, we waste so much food but when the SHTF or if we have limited income that we forget that the waste can be regrown at times .....

I understand ..... knowledge gained in our past is often lost a few generations later when technology or mechanics has over shadowed the knowledge of how we got along with out (X) item.



posted on Nov, 3 2012 @ 07:50 PM
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Originally posted by OnWhiteMars
I mean no disrespect but the appreciation for a thread like this just shows how long we have been disconnected from Mother Nature. The fact that people have to reminded of these things scares me :S I think we are screwed if we are bound for a big catastrophe.

Star for you anyway, because maybe this information will provide help.


I think it's good to have a list of go to re-plantable foods because GMO foods you don't want to plant and not all plants will grow from cut shoots.



posted on Nov, 3 2012 @ 07:58 PM
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But society wants us to compost. You don't compost everything, the potato peels need to be planted, there will be seed in the ground for many years.



posted on Nov, 3 2012 @ 09:08 PM
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Originally posted by OnWhiteMars
I mean no disrespect but the appreciation for a thread like this just shows how long we have been disconnected from Mother Nature. The fact that people have to reminded of these things scares me :S I think we are screwed if we are bound for a big catastrophe.

Star for you anyway, because maybe this information will provide help.


my father said my grandmother used to say each new generation gets weaker but wiser. I take that to mean that although technologically each generation gets more savvy, they are conversely becoming less able to withstand adversity



posted on Nov, 3 2012 @ 10:02 PM
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Originally posted by JohnPhoenix

Originally posted by OnWhiteMars
I mean no disrespect but the appreciation for a thread like this just shows how long we have been disconnected from Mother Nature. The fact that people have to reminded of these things scares me :S I think we are screwed if we are bound for a big catastrophe.

Star for you anyway, because maybe this information will provide help.


I think it's good to have a list of go to re-plantable foods because GMO foods you don't want to plant and not all plants will grow from cut shoots.


I'm pretty sure none of those plants he listed are varieties that are GM....yet. There was talk of a tomato, but I don't think it is on the market yet.

But to be safe, yeah, save and plant heirloom seeds, or tops from organic veggies only. It is not that hard. Even if you live in a very small place, you can get a lot of stuff to grow. I wish people would try it. It's all well and good to envision stepping out into the garden for food when things get tough, but most people have no experience or clue how to make a garden function.

We eat at least one or two meals a day. How long would a sprouted celery plant take to get big enough to even make one salad? Weeks? Practical self-sufficient gardening that actually has a chance to feed a family takes a much more focused approach. But it can be done.





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