The Universe is Probably Teaming with Life. (Hubble Reveals Deepest View Ever Of Night Sky)

page: 1
15
<<   2  3  4 >>

log in

join

posted on Sep, 26 2012 @ 01:42 AM
link   
Nothing spectacularly new for ufology here but I think it's pretty cool and no, I'm not one of those of people who say "if you check the tiny dot at so and so co-ordinates, that's a UFO"


Seriously though, when you look at that tiny piece of space and see the amount of potential there for life, I'll stake my rep on that we are not alone, there's just no way.



Ten years of Hubble Space Telescope images have been pieced together, revealing a kaleidoscope of galaxies and other celestial objects.



It adds another 5,500 galaxies to Hubble's 2003 and 2004 view into a tiny patch of the farthest universe.


A tiny piece that's probably not even 1/100 the size of the moon. I know there's no concrete evidence for E.T. life but chances are (and ofc TPTB probably already know), that it damn well exists out there.
Full link here: news.sky.com...
edit on 26-9-2012 by Zcustosmorum because: (no reason given)




posted on Sep, 26 2012 @ 02:26 AM
link   
This will shock you all, who know me as a skeptic:



Nick Risinger's Skymap

NR's Interactive Skymap


When looking at these images, please appreciate, that when fully zoomed in, every pixel of light is a star or a galaxy.

This image is just our galaxy the Milkyway. There are a 127 billion galaxies (estimated) that we can see, that are very much like our own Milkyway, with a similar number of stars in each.

There are probably an infinite amount out there, as the universe itself is infinite.

Then add on that there are probably other universes adjacent to our own (people are actively scouring the the skies, for evidence of the 'bruise' where our own universe bumped into and merged with another universe), then you start to get the idea of how big it is.

The observable universe is 78 billion light years from us, and the farthest we can see from point a, to the opposite side at point b is 156 billion light years.

So, to try to make that comprehensible, if you travelled the circumference of Earth (24,901 miles) at the speed of light (186,282 miles a SECOND) it would take you:

24,901 / 186,282 = 0.13367 seconds.

To travel from point A to point B (say beginning and end, even though it isn't) in the universe that WE CAN SEE, would take you 156 billion years, travelling at a speed of 186,282 miles a second, or 670,616,629 miles an hour.


Pretty big (
) and the shear amount of stars and planets, makes it to me, absolutely infeasible, that life only exists on this planet.

Whether Alien lifeforms are visiting this planet, is another question entirely, who knows?....



posted on Sep, 26 2012 @ 08:43 AM
link   
While I agree with the sentiments expressed by the OP, I have to say that this image as shown on the link provided puzzles me for very mundane reasons. Here is my question...

You will note that as the image or clip plays out, there appear to be layers of image data. What I want to know is, has the layered effect got more to do with the way the image was composed, or is the layering actually out there? Are the apparant gaps in the layers actual empty space, or is that an artifact of the image compilation process?



posted on Sep, 26 2012 @ 10:28 AM
link   
reply to post by TrueBrit
 


If I understand you correctly, then basically what you are seeing, is several 'images' composed of different levels of magnification (or zoom if you like), from the hubble space telescope. This info was then fed into a cgi movie, to try to make it comprehendable to the layman.

The very last image was taken by hubble looking at a seemingly empty region of space (when looking at it with a lower level of magnification, it appears black and empty). When the hubble zoomed in on that area, it saw thousands of other galaxies.

If you had a telescope powerful enough, and you did the same on the last image as previously, you would see thousands more galaxies in the seemingly empty dark spaces between the visible galaxies, and it probably goes on like that for infinity. Completely mind boggling.

edit on 26-9-2012 by AmatuerSkyWatcher because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 26 2012 @ 08:04 PM
link   
If there are no 2 snow flakes ever the same and they are just a simple configuration of a tiny drop of frozen water why should something as infinitely complex as life happen twice?

It could be that the beginnings of life happened on our planet only through a very specific set of events that happened in a very specific order over millions of years and then over millions of more years another very specific sent of events coupled with very specific conditions caused life to start evolving.

If this is true the chances of the exact same events happening in exactly the same order over exactly the same length of time with exactly the same chemicals in exactly the same ratios in exactly the same conditions is soo unimaginably small that even with all the galaxies and all the planets in the universe it might never happen again.


edit on 26-9-2012 by PhoenixOD because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 26 2012 @ 08:13 PM
link   
Yes true, the potential is all around us and there's no reason to currently believe there can't be any other life in the universe. The more important question is has it ever visited or made itself known to us. The answer of course being an un categorical no.



posted on Sep, 26 2012 @ 08:14 PM
link   
A ant could come to these conclusions, yet people only start listening once someone in a wheelchair that gets to think all day admits that's what he thinks?



humans



posted on Sep, 26 2012 @ 09:12 PM
link   
I don't think there's any question at all that life exists in other places.

The question is, does intelligent life exist in other places.

Don't forget the other dimension - time. It's possible that some extremely advanced race (or several) came into being out there somewhere and eventually went extinct - long before the Earth was even formed.

Harte



posted on Sep, 27 2012 @ 03:20 AM
link   
There are about 300 sextillion stars in the universe. That is 300 followed by 21 zeros.

300,000,000,000,000,000,000,000

Therefore, counting each of those stars, there is a
1 in 300,000,000,000,000,000,000,000 chance that aliens do NOT/b] exist...
[1 in 300 sextillionth chance]

That NO alien life forms are on any star-systems at all...

We don't even know how many planets are going around each of those stars, but that would make the number even higher, and therefore the chances that there are NO aliens would become even less likely...

By the way, I had to use a probability of aliens NOT existing because the chance that they do is extremely high....



posted on Sep, 27 2012 @ 06:59 AM
link   

Originally posted by arpgme
There are about 300 sextillion stars in the universe. That is 300 followed by 21 zeros.

300,000,000,000,000,000,000,000

Therefore, counting each of those stars, there is a
1 in 300,000,000,000,000,000,000,000 chance that aliens do NOT/b] exist...
[1 in 300 sextillionth chance]

That NO alien life forms are on any star-systems at all...

We don't even know how many planets are going around each of those stars, but that would make the number even higher, and therefore the chances that there are NO aliens would become even less likely...

By the way, I had to use a probability of aliens NOT existing because the chance that they do is extremely high....


lol..thats not how probability mathematics works.



posted on Sep, 27 2012 @ 07:07 AM
link   


The Universe is Probably Teaming with Life


Take out 'probably'.

There is no doubt the universe is teaming with life, the real question that needs to be answered is how intelligent this life is.
edit on 27-9-2012 by RiverRunsFree because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 27 2012 @ 07:12 AM
link   
Are we really that self indulgant that we believe we are the only ones out there. For me life has to be abundant out there, ameno acids which are the building blocks of life have been found on metiorites. Therefore if life just happens to appear by chance on our planet alone, it wouldn't be long before we contaminate other objects in space with our building blocks for life. In my humble opinion it is an absolute certainty that life exists else where.



posted on Sep, 27 2012 @ 07:23 AM
link   
reply to post by PhoenixOD
 


This seems to me to be a very nieve post, of course there is life outside our solar system......do you think we are that special?
The amount of stars (suns) is phenomenal .....so the amount of goldilocks zones are uncountable
No doubt there is life, as we know it or not , there is life out there



posted on Sep, 27 2012 @ 10:01 AM
link   

Originally posted by zerozero00
reply to post by PhoenixOD
 


This seems to me to be a very nieve post, of course there is life outside our solar system......do you think we are that special?
The amount of stars (suns) is phenomenal .....so the amount of goldilocks zones are uncountable
No doubt there is life, as we know it or not , there is life out there


Your post seems to be very naive to me. Just having planets in a Goldilocks zone does not ensure life (and they are not uncountable because they are a finite number). There might have to be an exact balance of specific chemicals to even have the chance for life to exist. Then certain events might have to happen in an exact order for something as complex as DNA to form. The fact that all life on earth uses DNA shows us that with no DNA even our plant can not produce life. Life only happens in one way on our perfect planet. This put the odds of it happening elsewhere in exactly the same way into astronomical numbers.

What most people do tend to realize about probability is that its no guarantee.

For example the chances of rolling a 4 with a dice is 1 in 6. If you roll the dice 5 times and you dont get a 4 whats the chance that you will get 4 on the next roll? Its still 1 in 6 the odds dont change with the number of rolls. You could roll the dice for ages and not get that 4.

So if the odds of there being life out there are even as low as 1 in 10 billion then that's what the odds are on each planet you find with exactly the right conditions. It doesn't mean that if you have 100 billion planets there is probably life on 10 of them.

So lets say that for life to happen chemical A has to bump into chemical B in exactly the right conditions (temp ,speed etc) whats the chances of that happening? then maybe what they form has to was around in water in just the right manor for a certain number of years..whats the chance of that happening? So we go on and on with random chance things happening until we get something that makes self replicating DNA whats the chances of that happening? with each chance happening the probability of the final outcome being intelligent life is multiplied. The numbers get highers and higher so they they might even be larger than the amount of stars in the universe let alone the number of planets in the Goldilocks zone with exactly the right amount of chemicals , light and not getting hit by a meteor that wipes it all out.

So in answer to your question..yes i think we are very special. In the entire history of our planet where the conditions are perfect and there are billions of forms of life were are the only life forms who have become clever enough to even contemplate questions like this.

edit on 27-9-2012 by PhoenixOD because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 27 2012 @ 10:03 AM
link   
reply to post by PhoenixOD
 




So in answer to your question..yes i think we are very special. In the entire history of our planet where the conditions are perfect and there are billions of forms of life were are the only life forms who have become clever enough to even contemplate questions like this.


Conditions don't have to be "perfect" for life to happen, life can survive some pretty extreme environments.

Anybody that hasn't seen this, please feel free to check out www.abovetopsecret.com...
edit on 27-9-2012 by Zcustosmorum because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 27 2012 @ 10:16 AM
link   

Originally posted by Zcustosmorum
reply to post by PhoenixOD
 




So in answer to your question..yes i think we are very special. In the entire history of our planet where the conditions are perfect and there are billions of forms of life were are the only life forms who have become clever enough to even contemplate questions like this.


Conditions don't have to be "perfect" for life to happen, life can survive some pretty extreme environments.

Anybody that hasn't seen this, please feel free to check out www.abovetopsecret.com...
edit on 27-9-2012 by Zcustosmorum because: (no reason given)


you have picked one sentence out of an entire explanation. you are comparing perfect by human standards to that of other organisms. In a temp scale of 0 to 100's of 1000's c/f all life on earth sits in an incredibly narrow pocket.

Self replicating DNA has only happened once as far as we know on this planet. everything has evolved from this. Hence the family tree of life on this planet. If conditions didnt have to be perfect for this to happen then we would see life forms on this planet that are not related to other animals. We would have many individual trees.

You cant just take the few chemicals that make up DNA and put them in a testube together shake them up and hey presto you have a self replicating double helix. If only it was that easy..

edit on 27-9-2012 by PhoenixOD because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 27 2012 @ 10:47 AM
link   
reply to post by PhoenixOD
 

Your forgetting about Panspermia.
There's a lot of rocks out there that have bacteria/Dna stuck on them waiting to land on a planet or other piece of rock with ideal conditions.
extremophiles, can survive conditions that would kill us.
So, yeah, life may not have originated here.

edit on 27-9-2012 by Toadmund because: f to g



posted on Sep, 27 2012 @ 10:56 AM
link   

Originally posted by Toadmund
reply to post by PhoenixOD
 

Your forgetting about Panspermia.
There's a lot of rocks out there that have bacteria/Dna stuck on them waiting to land on a planet or other piece of rock with ideal conditions.
extremophiles, can survive conditions that would kill us.
So, yeah, life may not have originated here.

edit on 27-9-2012 by Toadmund because: f to g


At the moment Panspermia is just a theory. If we ever find a meteor with DNA on it then the chances of life elsewhere becomes a certainty. So far all we have found is a few rocks with chemicals that exist here on earth.

I hope there is life out there its just that anyone who thinks that the numbers of planet out there means that life must exist does not understand the maths or the science.



posted on Sep, 27 2012 @ 11:39 AM
link   
reply to post by PhoenixOD
 



I hope there is life out there its just that anyone who thinks that the numbers of planet out there means that life must exist does not understand the maths or the science.


Bit harsh there mate and you can't argue with numbers, there's still more probability of life existing out there than not, regardless of maths or science. Seems to me a lot of people have trouble unshackling themselves from the natural trait of human ignorance.



posted on Sep, 27 2012 @ 11:48 AM
link   

Originally posted by Zcustosmorum
reply to post by PhoenixOD
 



I hope there is life out there its just that anyone who thinks that the numbers of planet out there means that life must exist does not understand the maths or the science.


Bit harsh there mate and you can't argue with numbers, there's still more probability of life existing out there than not, regardless of maths or science.


No theres more probability of life existing out there than not if certain things are proved to be true in the future.

Until then numbers of planets do not equal a good chance of there being any life out there at all. As we have 0 evidence of life being able to happen other that the one example of DNA existing on our planet.

That's the hard facts and those are the numbers.





new topics
top topics
 
15
<<   2  3  4 >>

log in

join