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Moon Landing Hoax - The Space Suit

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posted on Apr, 8 2012 @ 09:26 PM
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reply to post by Logitech411
 


What nonsense!!

You think the Apollo was "hoaxed"....yet you admit the "tech" didn't "exist" then????

Let's get back to the SPACE SUIT>........understand THAT, then come back.....OK????




posted on Apr, 8 2012 @ 09:33 PM
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Originally posted by ProudBird
reply to post by longjohnbritches
 



Ok let's hear the history of the little brown squashies.
I was told they were in bags and sat on untill the astronaught could store them for the return trip. Have you worked for NASA?


No, I do NOT "work" for NASA.....

"little brown squashies"?? Do you mean feces??

It is so VERY easy to look up, and understand how Astronauts.....back in 1960. OR in 2012 deal with bodily waste.....whether urine or feces.

I mean......it is NOT "pretty" in zero-G but, it is possible......there are SO many sources online to explain it.....

Poop in Space With No Gravity

THINK about it......if you poop in gravity (as here, on Earth)....then you can "feel" anything that "dangles"....right??

In micro-gravity.....such that "dangle" will not "fall"...so, you HAVE to wipe. Period.

Get it????
edit on Sun 8 April 2012 by ProudBird because: (no reason given)


Yes P B
I get the dingle berry part. Well maybe.
Micro gravity?? When did the astro diaper experience that twist?
I was hoping you had some poop from the inside.
You know what did they do with the fetcies (you know poo)??
thanks ljb
Micro gravity makes you whipe in space, check, so you don't whipe in macro gravity? errr
edit on 4/8/2012 by longjohnbritches because: macro G



posted on Apr, 8 2012 @ 09:34 PM
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reply to post by Logitech411
 


Exactly what is so different today with; propulsion systems, fuel, life support, and construction materials? Other than advances in computer technology (and the retired Space Shuttle thermal tiles) most of the very same systems are in use today, ever heard of Soyuz? (just to make this multi-National). A 1960's design still used today. Besides the single most powerful rocket engine ever made are the Rocketdyne F-1s used on the Saturn heavy lifts.



posted on Apr, 8 2012 @ 09:42 PM
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reply to post by longjohnbritches
 



You know what did they do with the fetcies (you know poo)??


IF you bothered to pay attention (or just "Google") then YOU would know as much as I do!!!

I HAVE LEARNED A LOT....based on these inane "questions"....and, THANKS for that!!!!!

Go, learn.....really.....GO!!!! LEARN!!!!!!



posted on Apr, 8 2012 @ 09:57 PM
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Originally posted by ProudBird
reply to post by longjohnbritches
 



You know what did they do with the fetcies (you know poo)??


IF you bothered to pay attention (or just "Google") then YOU would know as much as I do!!!

I HAVE LEARNED A LOT....based on these inane "questions"....and, THANKS for that!!!!!

Go, learn.....really.....GO!!!! LEARN!!!!!!



Wooo hold on wild man! have to many chocolate bunnies??
I look through that stuff you post. It does not tell what they found in that poop. Whether the suit protected the guts of the guys from moon biology,etc.
What the effects of micro gravity had on the digestive system and all.
Try a little yellow chicky they always help me cool off.
ljb



posted on Apr, 8 2012 @ 10:11 PM
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reply to post by longjohnbritches
 


Try reading this

Scroll down to "THERE AINT NO GRACEFUL WAY...."

Is a long interview with astronaut Russell "Rusty" Schweikart on how to do the deal (urination/defecation) in
Zero G

www.nss.org...



posted on Apr, 8 2012 @ 11:11 PM
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Originally posted by thedman
reply to post by longjohnbritches
 


Try reading this

Scroll down to "THERE AINT NO GRACEFUL WAY...."

Is a long interview with astronaut Russell "Rusty" Schweikart on how to do the deal (urination/defecation) in
Zero G

www.nss.org...

Hi thed,
Darn good to see you being this ambidexterous .
Is that something like micro gravity? I got no replies on that.
Do you know how it effects woo woo?
Rusty was a fly boy not aynalist of digested tang.
He created the samples.
I was looking for what NASA did with them.
FREEZE DRY, Smithonian display, polute space or the moon,
Since science takes every oportunity to look deep and long into new revelations
( moon poop should not be overlooked)
You see, I am not asking how they made IT,
I actually thought PB knew where and how they tested IT.
Belated EASTER wishes thed. ljb



posted on Apr, 9 2012 @ 02:12 AM
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Originally posted by longjohnbritches
I look through that stuff you post. It does not tell what they found in that poop. Whether the suit protected the guts of the guys from moon biology,etc. What the effects of micro gravity had on the digestive system and all.


Come on, LJB. Everybody knows a little moon-tang never hurt anyone.



posted on Apr, 9 2012 @ 03:07 PM
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Originally posted by Bedlam

Originally posted by longjohnbritches
I look through that stuff you post. It does not tell what they found in that poop. Whether the suit protected the guts of the guys from moon biology,etc. What the effects of micro gravity had on the digestive system and all.


Come on, LJB. Everybody knows a little moon-tang never hurt anyone.


Hi bed ,
Try to be a little serious here. Although a moon, spoon, poo- tang does have a nice melodic sound.
The suit for that, first man to walk on the moon has to be totally flawless.

NASA is not . Something we can all agree upon.
The command module with men in it somewhat plausible.
Orbiting the moon alot less.
The LEM far less plausible.
250,000 miles from where it was built and never successfully tested.
Suit and all.

So the suit should and could be the Achillies Heal.
With the complexity of the preciseness of the needs of a human on the moon
The odds of each and every un- tested function of the first mission is not one a stable mind would broadcast on live TV.

For instance. Have you ever caught a fish from deep sea?
Say 4-6 atmosphers below sea level??
Maybe a Tile fish out in the Hudson Canyon??
You know that if you bring them up fast thier guts and things pop out of their orifices. That could happen in space if the suit does not maintain the correct psi.
Correct ljb



posted on Apr, 9 2012 @ 03:35 PM
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reply to post by longjohnbritches
 


I'm not "bedlam"....and your idea (here) is FLAWED:


The suit for that, first man to walk on the moon has to be totally flawless.


PLEASE do some research.

The EVA suits used on Apollo were NOT "untested"......

PLEASE do some research......start with Mercury....and Gemini....and EVEN BEFORE THAT era....go deeper.....to the X-15 studies......

You "might" learn something..........



posted on Apr, 9 2012 @ 03:36 PM
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Originally posted by ProudBird

You "might" learn something..........


Judging from his past this is extremely doubtful.



posted on Apr, 9 2012 @ 03:41 PM
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Originally posted by paradox

Originally posted by ProudBird

You "might" learn something..........


Judging from his past this is extremely doubtful.


(SORRY to Mods and Owners....but......I just need to LAUGH OUT LOUD at this!!!)

It is SO perfect!!!




(I have one of those things.....!!!!)
edit on Mon 9 April 2012 by ProudBird because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 9 2012 @ 04:54 PM
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reply to post by longjohnbritches
 


LEM, I suppose you mean the lunar module was tested, docking was also tested, as well as occupant transfer and so where the suits, extensively. You can't get away with a totally fabricated hit-and-run post of complete bull.



posted on Apr, 9 2012 @ 05:25 PM
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Originally posted by paradox

Originally posted by ProudBird

You "might" learn something..........


Judging from his past this is extremely doubtful.


How true para
You can tell by his childish and frustrated tempt the mods replies.
Thanks for pointing out how the Bird flies.
To bad you didn't have the t+c to post anything concerning the thread though.
thanks for straighten out the bird!
ljb
PS hope the Jbird pecks him a good one.



posted on Apr, 9 2012 @ 05:50 PM
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Originally posted by Illustronic
reply to post by longjohnbritches
 


LEM, I suppose you mean the lunar module was tested, docking was also tested, as well as occupant transfer and so where the suits, extensively. You can't get away with a totally fabricated hit-and-run post of complete bull.


Hi ill.
Well obviously I just did.
A yaah. yeeah from you is normal. I stick by what I said. It is the the post above.
Unless you have a dangler in your space diaper like proudbird, contest with some ammo. ya no content.
later ljb



posted on Apr, 9 2012 @ 05:59 PM
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reply to post by longjohnbritches
 



Every aspect of micro gravity has been explored by this point we know how to handle it. Are you aware that in 2000 they even checked if it was viable for astronauts to have sex in space.Gives new meaning to the term rock your world huh.


Ps They discovered missionary isnt possible in 0 g which actually shocked me apparently we need gravity for that.
edit on 4/9/12 by dragonridr because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 9 2012 @ 06:00 PM
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reply to post by longjohnbritches
 



You know that if you bring them up fast thier guts and things pop out of their orifices. That could happen in space if the suit does not maintain the correct psi.


Simply wrong. There is only one atmosphere difference between an astronaut's insides and the vacuum of space. Your blood might boil but you won't 'pop."



posted on Apr, 9 2012 @ 06:05 PM
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Originally posted by DJW001
reply to post by longjohnbritches
 



You know that if you bring them up fast thier guts and things pop out of their orifices. That could happen in space if the suit does not maintain the correct psi.


Simply wrong. There is only one atmosphere difference between an astronaut's insides and the vacuum of space. Your blood might boil but you won't 'pop."


Exactly no pop actually every blood vessel in your body would be destroyed all at once as the liquid in your body tried to escape into space. Think more along the lines of freeze drying a human in about 5 seconds.



posted on Apr, 9 2012 @ 06:21 PM
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Originally posted by dragonridr

Originally posted by DJW001
reply to post by longjohnbritches
 



You know that if you bring them up fast thier guts and things pop out of their orifices. That could happen in space if the suit does not maintain the correct psi.


Simply wrong. There is only one atmosphere difference between an astronaut's insides and the vacuum of space. Your blood might boil but you won't 'pop."


Exactly no pop actually every blood vessel in your body would be destroyed all at once as the liquid in your body tried to escape into space. Think more along the lines of freeze drying a human in about 5 seconds.


You're actually pretty tough against vacuum. If you open your mouth and breathe out hard when you decompress, you can keep going for about 30 seconds before you shut down, it takes several minutes for you to die. Of course, even if they get to you pretty fast you will have popped eardrums and a possible case of negative pressure pulmonary edema to contend with.

People have had vacuums pulled on them several times in industrial accidents, no one popped or freeze dried, and barring fatal accidents connected with the exposure, most of them lived with no long term issues.



posted on Apr, 9 2012 @ 06:29 PM
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reply to post by dragonridr
 


Simply not true, I found many references of this years ago and here's one from NASA of abrupt exposure to space, which in the scenario mentioned doesn't apply but consider this a free education.


How long can a human live unprotected in space?

If you don't try to hold your breath, exposure to space for half a minute or so is unlikely to produce permanent injury. Holding your breath is likely to damage your lungs, something scuba divers have to watch out for when ascending, and you'll have eardrum trouble if your Eustachian tubes are badly plugged up, but theory predicts -- and animal experiments confirm -- that otherwise, exposure to vacuum causes no immediate injury. You do not explode. Your blood does not boil. You do not freeze. You do not instantly lose consciousness.

Various minor problems (sunburn, possibly "the bends", certainly some [mild, reversible, painless] swelling of skin and underlying tissue) start after ten seconds or so. At some point you lose consciousness from lack of oxygen. Injuries accumulate. After perhaps one or two minutes, you're dying. The limits are not really known.

You do not explode and your blood does not boil because of the containing effect of your skin and circulatory system. You do not instantly freeze because, although the space environment is typically very cold, heat does not transfer away from a body quickly. Loss of consciousness occurs only after the body has depleted the supply of oxygen in the blood. If your skin is exposed to direct sunlight without any protection from its intense ultraviolet radiation, you can get a very bad sunburn.

At NASA's Manned Spacecraft Center (now renamed Johnson Space Center) we had a test subject accidentally exposed to a near vacuum (less than 1 psi) in an incident involving a leaking space suit in a vacuum chamber back in '65. He remained conscious for about 14 seconds, which is about the time it takes for O2 deprived blood to go from the lungs to the brain. The suit probably did not reach a hard vacuum, and we began repressurizing the chamber within 15 seconds. The subject regained consciousness at around 15,000 feet equivalent altitude. The subject later reported that he could feel and hear the air leaking out, and his last conscious memory was of the water on his tongue beginning to boil.

Aviation Week and Space Technology (02/13/95) printed a letter by Leonard Gordon which reported another vacuum-packed anecdote:

"The experiment of exposing an unpressurized hand to near vacuum for a significant time while the pilot went about his business occurred in real life on Aug. 16, 1960. Joe Kittinger, during his ascent to 102,800 ft (19.5 miles) in an open gondola, lost pressurization of his right hand. He decided to continue the mission, and the hand became painful and useless as you would expect. However, once back to lower altitudes following his record-breaking parachute jump, the hand returned to normal."


This is not as thorough as what I quoted in the past, but you are just shooting from the hip anyway, and don't bother to verify what you spew.

Link.
90 seconds or more one can survive exposure to space with no permanent irreversible damage.
Freezing or even getting cold is the least of your worries, likely a preservative (mammalian effect), because there is no heat carrier in space.
edit on 9-4-2012 by Illustronic because: (no reason given)





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