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Moon Landing Hoax - The Space Suit

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posted on Apr, 9 2012 @ 06:38 PM
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Originally posted by dragonridr
reply to post by longjohnbritches
 



Every aspect of micro gravity has been explored by this point we know how to handle it. Are you aware that in 2000 they even checked if it was viable for astronauts to have sex in space.Gives new meaning to the term rock your world huh.


Ps They discovered missionary isnt possible in 0 g which actually shocked me apparently we need gravity for that.

edit on 4/9/12 by dragonridr because: (no reason given)


Hi dino
Yeah it rocks it alright.
Some NASA db's are getting off and me and my kids are pickin up the bill.
Same as the kiddy posters here. I hope they get crabs in there space diapers.
later ljb




posted on Apr, 9 2012 @ 06:47 PM
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reply to post by longjohnbritches
 


You can think what you want and entertain yourself with your hipster lingo, you still say little substance, and will be ignored.



posted on Apr, 9 2012 @ 07:37 PM
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reply to post by Illustronic
 


All you said back in your other post is a little flunky. Not all bad though.
To simplify an earth atmosphere is 14.2 psi
If moon space vacume is only an atmosphere different, 60.000 ft. +or - 14.2 pounds psi
Then presurasation is moot. Nitrogen will not migrate from the blood untill a pressure of 33psi is exerted for a very long time. (bends)
I was mostly talking about the testing. Would you like to learn about that?

the best ljb



posted on Apr, 9 2012 @ 10:05 PM
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The real story of the Apollo space suits begins with sleazy government contracting and industrial espionage. Courtesy of the military industrial complex. Firstly they won, then lost the contract, then somebody decided to steal the designs and, lo and behold, they won the big contract.
Each Apollo mission required fifteen (15) suits to support the mission.


So three years after winning (and then losing) the contract, a dozen ILC staffers picked the locks of their old offices at Hamilton and, Sterling Cooper-style, stole back their designs. Working round-the-clock shifts for six weeks, they finished a brand-new suit, the AX5L, in time to be a dark-horse third entry in the 1965 competition. It won, acing 12 of the 22 tests—and since one rival suit wouldn’t fit through the door of the space capsule, and the helmet of the other exploded, there was no runner-up.


www.wired.com...

So let's get back to basics. There was only one company in the United States that was technically capable of building a space suit in 1965. That company was ILC.



posted on Apr, 9 2012 @ 11:38 PM
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Originally posted by Illustronic
reply to post by dragonridr
 


Simply not true, I found many references of this years ago and here's one from NASA of abrupt exposure to space, which in the scenario mentioned doesn't apply but consider this a free education.


CSB time again - (got a million of 'em):

If you've ever seen an escape trunk on a sub, you put divers in this thing, seal the door, open the thing to sea and vent the air. Once the air's gone, you open the hatch and out you go to do your diving mission thing, if that's your job.

When you come back, you close and dog the outboard hatch, then they open the inside vent to air and pump the water overboard from the bottom. At least that's the way it's supposed to work.

It's a pretty darn good pump.

There were some SEALs going out the door one time to do something untoward, and the going out went real well. On the way back, for this one guy, they forgot to vent and pumped out the water, drawing a real nice vacuum on him. He turned out ok but the photos weren't pretty - he was fizzing at the eyes.



posted on Apr, 9 2012 @ 11:48 PM
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Why would a Hollywood movie theatre holding company get into the government contracting game?


International Latex was purchased by Stanley Warner, the former theater holdings of Warner Bros., in 1954.
Stanley Warner merged with fellow theater company Glen Alden in 1968, which merged with Rapid-American in 1972. Rapid-American sold the company, renamed as International Playtex, Inc. to Esmark in 1975. Source en.wikipedia.org...



1945 Stanley Warner Corp. purchases the controlling interest in the International Latex Corp.

In Nov. '66 ILC Industries, Inc. is incorporated in the State of Delaware as a wholly owned subsidiary of Stanley Warner Corp. On Dec. 22 1967 Stanley Warner Corp. is merged into the Glen Alden Corp.

In 1968, At this time, 90% of the company's revenues come from the space suit program.

1969 In Jan. of 1969, ILC went public and sold 225,000 shares of common stock to the public at $7.25 a share.
Glen Alden retained 70% ownership of the company.

1977 ILC Industries, Inc. is purchased by Rapid American Corp. from Glen Alden Corp.

1982 Rapid American sells ILC Industries to Mr. Leonard Lane. The Lane family still owns the company today.
Source history.nasa.gov...


According the ILC Dover corporate video here www.ilcdover.com...

... they also work on "military surveillance from space." Quote from the video.
...they also work "getting new drugs to the market sooner." Quote from the video.
....and they also manufacture inflatable structures (since the early 1970's) that could be erected anywhere, like in a remote desert. I can imagine that with a film crew and some life-size lunar modules, and some very large light arrays that they might be able to make a good moon movie inside one of these structures.




posted on Apr, 9 2012 @ 11:59 PM
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Originally posted by jazzguy
dont forget that people have measured the space suits and found them to be 32 or so inches wide. How could that fit through a 32-inch door?

when this mistake was observed by nasa they scrambled to change the door to 42 inches and even lost the lunar module blueprints in an effort to cover up this error.

critical mistake made by the nasa movie factory
edit on 6-4-2012 by jazzguy because: (no reason given)


OH this is an interesting point.

wow.



posted on Apr, 10 2012 @ 01:04 AM
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reply to post by toocoolnc
 
The following is my opinion as a member participating in this discussion.

I don't have time ATM to go through 20 pages of this thread tonight to see if this has already been answered or not yet, since its a simple fact, I'm just going to answer it for you here.

The suit A/C was a separate unit that was carried by the astronauts like a suitcase.
You'll see mercury astronaut Allen Shepard carrying one here:

These A/C units were only needed on the earth to keep the astronauts from sweating in their suits. A/C was pumped in to the capsules through the jetbridge while they were waiting for bast-off. Look at this picture, behind Guenter Wendt (Da' Pad Fuhrer), that white tube is A/C tubing:

If your very observant, you'll notice that in the foreground of the above picture, an ILC contractor is bending down to disconnect Buzz Aldren's (I think) suit A/C unit...

This is the same jetway A/C units that are used in normal aviation jetway to aircraft A/C systems:


Space is freezing cold, A/C is not needed in space.

As an ATS Staff Member, I will not moderate in threads such as this where I have participated as a member.



posted on Apr, 10 2012 @ 01:14 AM
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Originally posted by amazing

Originally posted by jazzguy
dont forget that people have measured the space suits and found them to be 32 or so inches wide. How could that fit through a 32-inch door?

when this mistake was observed by nasa they scrambled to change the door to 42 inches and even lost the lunar module blueprints in an effort to cover up this error.

critical mistake made by the nasa movie factory
edit on 6-4-2012 by jazzguy because: (no reason given)


OH this is an interesting point.

wow.


No it isn't.

Each suit was measured and customized to each astronaut's body. Not all of them would happen to be 32 (if they all were, i would like to see a link.)

Also, the UCH (unified crew hatch) was about 39 inches wide, so even if they all happened to be 32 inches wide, that is plenty of room to fit through a 39 inch (100cm/3 ft 3 3/8 in.)wide door, unless I'm missing something here.

www.nasm.si.edu...

You should try doing your own research. This is why stupid things continuously get repeated.
edit on 4-10-12 by paradox because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 10 2012 @ 01:24 AM
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reply to post by defcon5
 





I don't have time ATM to go through 20 pages of this thread tonight to see if this has already been answered or not yet, since its a simple fact, I'm just going to answer it for you here.


Three pages would have been enough.




These A/C units were only needed on the earth to keep the astronauts from sweating in their suits.


Ahh, no, but they did have portable units for terrestrial use.




Space is freezing cold, A/C is not needed in space.


*Facepalm.

If the Mods are too lazy to get their facts right.......what hope do the rest of the ATS community have?

I'd go back and read the first twenty pages, if I were you.

Learning is fun



posted on Apr, 10 2012 @ 01:33 AM
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reply to post by OccamAssassin
 


The following is my opinion as a member participating in this discussion.

Sorry, but space is cold:

The issue then is how cold it is in space where there is almost no source of heat nearby. If you were to measure the temperature of space with an accurate thermometer then you could say with certainty that space is cold and very cold at that. Of course, you would first have to wait the very long time necessary for all the ambient heat in the thermometer to radiate into space before you could get an accurate reading. The resulting temperature reading would be 2.73 Kelvin this is the coldest naturally occurring temperature to absolute zero. The reason that it is not at this temperature is due to background radiation left over from the formation of the Universe.

This is why the Apollo 13 astronauts nearly froze when they lost power:

Chilling Out Aboard Apollo 13
One of the worst problems for the crew during that return flight was the cold. Without power in the CM, there were no heaters to maintain cabin temperatures. The temperature in the CM dropped to around 38 degrees F and the crew stopped using it for their sleep breaks. Instead, they jury-rigged beds in the warmer LM, though warmer is a relative term. The cold kept the crew from resting well and Mission Control became concerned that the resulting fatigue could keep them from functioning properly.


As an ATS Staff Member, I will not moderate in threads such as this where I have participated as a member.

edit on 4/10/2012 by defcon5 because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 10 2012 @ 01:39 AM
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reply to post by defcon5
 



Sorry, but space is cold


Yes space is cold....around 2.75 above absolute zero.....in the shade.

What is the temperature of the Solar wind?

If NASA only had to worry about the extreme cold.....there would be no reason to have a heat exchanger on the back of the PLSS.



posted on Apr, 10 2012 @ 01:47 AM
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Originally posted by defcon5

Sorry, but space is cold:


Actually space isn't anything, in terms of temperature. What you've got is a really good radiative sink near absolute zero, so anything in the shade radiates heat away with a bottom temp limit in the single digits K.



posted on Apr, 10 2012 @ 01:55 AM
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reply to post by OccamAssassin
 
The following is my opinion as a member participating in this discussion.

The pack you're talking about was used for the lunar excursions, they were not used in space.
I'm pretty certain that the OP mentioned using A/C in a vacuum, which means space, the moon has an atmosphere albeit a very thin one.

The reason for needing A/C on the moon, is that the moon is large enough to catch the sun and retain the heat from it, which a small Apollo capsule isn't. As a matter of fact, with such a thin lunar atmosphere, the temperature on the moon would be quite hot on the sunlit side:

The temperature on the moon varies from -387 Fahrenheit (-233 Celsius), at night, to 253 Fahrenheit (123 Celsius) during the day. Because the moon has no atmosphere to block some of the sun's rays or to help trap heat at night, its temperature varies greatly between day and night.

With that said, none of what I stated above is incorrect in anyway, as a matter of fact, its dead on right when talking about the conditions in the vacuum of actual space.

Learning is fun...



As an ATS Staff Member, I will not moderate in threads such as this where I have participated as a member.



posted on Apr, 10 2012 @ 01:59 AM
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Originally posted by Bedlam
Actually space isn't anything, in terms of temperature. What you've got is a really good radiative sink near absolute zero, so anything in the shade radiates heat away with a bottom temp limit in the single digits K.

Sorry, I guess I didn't realize that absolute zero wasn't considered cold cold by some. I guess that if you live in Antarctica it would be considered a slightly chilly day.



posted on Apr, 10 2012 @ 02:15 AM
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Originally posted by defcon5
Sorry, I guess I didn't realize that absolute zero wasn't considered cold cold by some. I guess that if you live in Antarctica it would be considered a slightly chilly day.


Space isn't absolute zero though, it's not anything, in that its temperature is undefined.

It's not hot, it's not cold, it doesn't have a temperature at all.

Things in space that absorb heat radiatively become hot, or if they've got a heat source internally. When the Apollo LEM and command module were powered up, the equipment and the body heat of the astronauts plus whatever solar heat they were receiving kept the craft warm. Warm enough they used a sublimator to cool it. After the Apollo 13 accident, the power was off, so it got quite a bit colder than normal. Had the craft been a lot less shiny it wouldn't have needed heat then.

The parts of the Apollo not in direct sunlight will radiate heat to space. Since the radiative sink is near absolute zero, radiative cooling is pretty efficient and the bottom end it can reach with no solar or internal heat source is in the single digits K.

edit to add: Behold!
edit on 10-4-2012 by Bedlam because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 10 2012 @ 02:16 AM
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reply to post by defcon5
 




The pack you're talking about was used for the lunar excursions, they were not used in space.


Doesn't the EVA suit(MMU) contain a PLSS?

Educate yourself!

Why is there a cooling system built into the walls of the ISS?


Surely if the ISS were only subject to extreme cold....wouldn't such a system be useless?

Maybe those kooky engineers that design these systems, need to forget everything they know and get the Defcon5 manual for building space vehicles.

edit on 10/4/2012 by OccamAssassin because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 10 2012 @ 02:19 AM
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Originally posted by defcon5
reply to post by OccamAssassin
 
The following is my opinion as a member participating in this discussion.

The pack you're talking about was used for the lunar excursions, they were not used in space.



Wrong.

en.wikipedia.org...



Unless I'm misunderstanding "they were not used in space."
edit on 4-10-12 by paradox because: (no reason given)
extra DIV



posted on Apr, 10 2012 @ 02:41 AM
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reply to post by paradox
 

The following is my opinion as a member participating in this discussion.


They don't have to use the A/C in those suits unless they get overheated from working, or fog their face shields because of the heat of their own breath. They are used now for the convenience of having temperature control, and because they hold the air supply (among other things). Having cooling on a spacewalk is not a necessity, its a convenience.
This guy certainly didn't have one:


BTW, the PLSS for the Apollo excursions, and used on the ISS/Shuttle is not the same system.

As an ATS Staff Member, I will not moderate in threads such as this where I have participated as a member.



posted on Apr, 10 2012 @ 02:50 AM
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Originally posted by Bedlam

Originally posted by defcon5
Sorry, I guess I didn't realize that absolute zero wasn't considered cold cold by some. I guess that if you live in Antarctica it would be considered a slightly chilly day.


Space isn't absolute zero though, it's not anything, in that its temperature is undefined.

It's not hot, it's not cold, it doesn't have a temperature at all.
The following is my opinion as a member participating in this discussion.


A lack of heat, or “nothing” as you call it, is by definition “cold”. Cold is "a lack of heat", heat being a radiated energy. This is the same way that “dark” is actually a lack of light, light again being a radiated energy. So saying that space is “nothing” is in fact admitting that its cold.

As an ATS Staff Member, I will not moderate in threads such as this where I have participated as a member.

edit on 4/10/2012 by defcon5 because: (no reason given)



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