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Were Ancient Alien Animals Brought To Earth For Man To Domesticate?

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posted on Mar, 25 2012 @ 11:00 AM
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According to the ancient Sumerian tablets of The Enuma Elish, certain grains and ewe sheep were transported to earth from nibiru by the Annunaki for humans to farm after the great flood almost 13,000 years ago.
This would explain the curious issue of how highly evolved grains, apparently without any evolutional missing links or developmental ancestry, appeared on earth as if from nowhere at about the same time mentioned in the Enuma Elish.

Now, I believe in the general concept of evolution, however, I have little or no knowledge of animal husbandry.
That said, I would like to know if there is any substantial evidence in the evolutionary record pointing to the specific evolution of sheep on earth before this time.

It seems to me that this idea of ancient alien visitors coming to earth and providing post deluge man with alien sheep, so that they (mankind) may begin to raise livestock and develop civilization, could easily be either proved or disproved, by whether or not a terrestrial evolutionary chain of ancestry for sheep actually exists.

“Sheep (Ovis aries) were probably first domesticated at least three separate times in the Fertile Crescent of western Iran and Turkey, Syria and Iraq. This occurred approximately 10,500 years ago, and involved at least three different subspecies of the wild mouflon (Ovis gmelini). Sheep were the first "meat" animals domesticated.”
From:
archaeology.about.com...




posted on Mar, 25 2012 @ 11:06 AM
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reply to post by IAMTAT
 


It's been a while since I've read up on the Sumerians and their tablets but I'm pretty sure they did not discuss this Nibiru or the bringing of sheep from another planet, right? Do tell, where are you getting your information? If you're really interested in ancient Sumeria here's a valid link you should visit, psd.museum.upenn.edu...

And those who are interested in ENUMA ELISH THE EPIC OF CREATION, a Babylonian Creation Story. Interesting enough, I suppose Nibiru is mentioned in this tablet but its not what you say it is,



May he hold the Beginning and the Future, may they pay homage unto him, Saying, "He who forced his way through the midst of Tiamat without resting, Let his name be Nibiru, 'the Seizer of the Midst'! For the stars of heaven he upheld the paths, He shepherded all the gods like sheep!




edit on 25-3-2012 by Swills because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 25 2012 @ 11:10 AM
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there are no niburian sheep - close this thread.



posted on Mar, 25 2012 @ 11:27 AM
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Originally posted by IAMTAT
That said, I would like to know if there is any substantial evidence in the evolutionary record pointing to the specific evolution of sheep on earth before this time.
Considering that there are more species in the Ovis genus, I think that shows that sheep were already part of the Earth's animal population.



posted on Mar, 25 2012 @ 11:31 AM
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Maybe they brought our hooved (sic?) animal ancestors with them....how far back do cow fossils go???



posted on Mar, 25 2012 @ 11:32 AM
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reply to post by Swills
 


I was refering to Sitchin's translation from The Lost Book Of Enki.
I will try to find the exact quote to post here. If anyone can find it sooner...please post.



posted on Mar, 25 2012 @ 11:35 AM
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reply to post by ArMaP
 


Perhaps you're right...I am just curious what the fossil record has to say about sheep.
Certainly there exists an issue with genetically-avanced grains suddenly appearing on earth very recently.



posted on Mar, 25 2012 @ 11:42 AM
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Just a wild guess but if I had to pick a grain it would be corn. Here's a little on the history:

www.campsilos.org...


"Corn as we know it today would not exist if it weren't for the humans that cultivated and developed it. It is a human invention, a plant that does not exist naturally in the wild. It can only survive if planted and protected by humans.

Scientists believe people living in central Mexico developed corn at least 7000 years ago. It was started from a wild grass called teosinte. Teosinte looked very different from our corn today. The kernels were small and were not placed close together like kernels on the husked ear of modern corn. Also known as maize Indians throughout North and South America, eventually depended upon this crop for much of their food."



posted on Mar, 25 2012 @ 11:45 AM
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Originally posted by IAMTAT
reply to post by Swills
 


I was refering to Sitchin's translation from The Lost Book Of Enki.
I will try to find the exact quote to post here. If anyone can find it sooner...please post.


Well that explains it then. You should have mentioned that in you original post that your source is Sitichin and not the actual tablets themselves.



posted on Mar, 25 2012 @ 11:53 AM
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"Let us from Niburu seeds that are sown bring down...Ewes that sheep become to Earth deliver...farming and shepherding teach...By civilized man let Anunnaki and Earthlings become satiated."



posted on Mar, 25 2012 @ 11:56 AM
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reply to post by PunchyChap
 


I'm sure the answers are in the DNA coding of the supposed sheep hybrids, so don't be an ignorant female dog....



posted on Mar, 25 2012 @ 12:05 PM
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reply to post by sgspecial19
 

Thank you for that.
I am only saying that there should be a way to prove or disprove this idea through genetic and/or fossil records of the existance of sheep on earth.



posted on Mar, 25 2012 @ 12:17 PM
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"Let us begin with the enigma of the modern corn plant. The humble origin of corn remains mysterious because the ancestral wild plant has never been located. It is an established, scientific fact that corn is a cultigen, a plant engineered by humans. This means that it has become so altered by humans that it cannot reproduce naturally and is entirely dependent upon man’s continued cultivation. In short, it is now a manmade plant and has been for some time. Scientists have not been able to trace the lineage of corn to the ancestral wild plant. How can this be if the ‘agricultural revolution’ only occurred 7-8,000 years ago?

Corn is a form of wild grass, as are the majority of the other major crop plants, there is no good reason for the ancestral variety to have vanished and/or become extinct. 10,000 years may seem like a long time in human terms yet it is a very short time in terms of the evolution and life span of a plant species. There are ancient plants that have existed continuously for hundreds of millions of years.

If you believe that our ancestors domesticated crop plants, you have to start by assuming that people without any agricultural experience were brilliant enough to select and breed the best wild seed candidates to turn into major cereal crops. It is a historical fact that in spite of 5,000 years of continuous agricultural development we have not genetically bred a new major crop from a wild species. Just how ingenious were out Stone Age predecessors who performed this agronomic feat without any agricultural or genetic knowledge?

Basing the agricultural revolution on the notion that people who lacked any understanding of the scientific basis of plant breeding created seems a very shaky premise. Skepticism is warranted due to the fact that, if it actually occurred, this was the riskiest of gambles, since it represented a complete departure from the only way of life and only food sources that Stone Age people knew.

But first let’s step back to an earlier point and ask how we know that 100,000 generations of Stone Age humans did not eat wild grass seeds. Our guts are still not adapted to digest uncooked grains. After all we are not birds. In addition, our Paleolithic ancestors lacked the technology to harvest, thresh, process and cook wild grass seeds. The seeds of wild species are miniscule and they are attached to the seed heads making them difficult to harvest and hardly worth the effort.

These are little known facts that raise deeper issues. Our hunter-gatherer ancestors mainly subsisted on leafy greens and lean muscle meats. If they lacked an extended experience with wild grasses how did they know which ones to select to turn into wheat, rye, corn, barely and rice? In other words these are still the principal food crops that our civilizations are based upon. After at least 5,000 years of continuous agriculture we do not seem to have improved upon the first selections of our ‘scientifically ignorant’ ancestors. That hardly seems logical.

This amazingly prescient selection of wild seeds seems not only more than a little surprising it looks to border on being a minor miracle. There are an estimated 195,000 flowering plants that they could have turned into food sources and primitive man chose less than .01 to base agriculture upon. This happened at a point in time when people had no concept of domesticating plants or animals, which means no experience with artificial selection.

To further appreciate the paradox that this situation imposes upon us we have to understand, domesticated crop plants are nothing like their wild ancestors. Farmers have long known this fact. The differences are so great that most of the specific ancestral locations of our cereal crops remain a mystery. We must ponder what this really means. What are the implications of our scientists not being able to trace the specific wild ancestors of modern corn, wheat, rye, barely and rice?"
-Will Hart
www.world-mysteries.com...



posted on Mar, 25 2012 @ 12:27 PM
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Originally posted by IAMTAT
Certainly there exists an issue with genetically-avanced grains suddenly appearing on earth very recently.

I guess that depends on the definition of "genetically-advanced".



posted on Mar, 25 2012 @ 12:33 PM
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reply to post by ArMaP
 

True, ArMaP, but it does seem that these grains show little or no progression from primitive grains to their advanced genetic state 10,000 years ago.



posted on Mar, 25 2012 @ 12:43 PM
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reply to post by IAMTAT
 


Where can I get that information? Maybe they explain the meaning of "genetically advanced".



posted on Mar, 25 2012 @ 12:55 PM
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reply to post by ArMaP
 

Sorry, "genetically-advanced" was my language...which was used as a relative term.
Please note the article posted above. There appears to be much on this ancient grain 'enigma' on the Internet after a cursory search (potential ancient alien influence notwithstanding).



posted on Mar, 25 2012 @ 12:59 PM
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reply to post by IAMTAT
 


My personal opinion (knowing nothing also about animal husbandry) is that the hardy goat was the first animal domesticated and used for meat. Sheep would have become popular later for their wool, of course. However, this pet (pun intended) theory of mine means that naked goat herders ran around loose (pun intended again) for quite a spell over the hills and dales chasing their goats.

And didn't I just yesterday read an account from a German about finding a few years ago a dead, frozen sheep at the fence of his military base when the weather was too mild for that to happen? Delayed delivery? Interstellar traffic?



posted on Mar, 25 2012 @ 01:45 PM
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reply to post by IAMTAT
 


If you are referring to the "If they lacked an extended experience with wild grasses how did they know which ones to select to turn into wheat, rye, corn, barely and rice?" sentence, what it says isn't true, as those plants were "turned into" what we know today from a different plant, they already existed (and some still do).

Where I live, in untreated terrains, it's normal to see something that looks like a smaller version of wheat, for example, along with wild oats.



posted on Mar, 25 2012 @ 01:59 PM
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reply to post by ArMaP
 

I was referring to these elements in the article:

"Scientists have not been able to trace the lineage of corn to the ancestral wild plant. How can this be if the ‘agricultural revolution’ only occurred 7-8,000 years ago? "

"To further appreciate the paradox that this situation imposes upon us we have to understand, domesticated crop plants are nothing like their wild ancestors. Farmers have long known this fact. The differences are so great that most of the specific ancestral locations of our cereal crops remain a mystery. We must ponder what this really means. What are the implications of our scientists not being able to trace the specific wild ancestors of modern corn, wheat, rye, barely and rice?"



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