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Were Ancient Alien Animals Brought To Earth For Man To Domesticate?

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posted on Mar, 26 2012 @ 02:43 PM
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Originally posted by IAMTAT
reply to post by consigliere
 

I can definitely concede that if (and the evidence is pretty firm) a near extinction level event occurred about 11,500 BC., then whatever survivors there were at the time would have embarked upon something of a mass- cathartic innovative expansion in order to survive the completely new environment in which they then found themselves.

Hunter-gatherers finding their game significantly reduced, would have been forced to turn to farming grains and livestock to adapt and survive.

Since practically all of these new disciplines and skills seem to appear around 10,000 BC., this would allow for something like a 1,500 year long creative renaissance to take place. A smaller case in point would be our own more recent intellectual and creative expansion after the traumatic Dark Ages.

Crisis breeds opportunity and creative order.



I completely understand this. 1500 years (give or take) would probably give rise to such an endeavor. Thank you for the insight




posted on Mar, 26 2012 @ 04:19 PM
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Originally posted by consigliere
No other creature (maybe im wrong) farms.

As previously posted by Flavian, some ants (the leafcutter ants) have fungus farms, as do ambrosia beetles and some termites.

In their relationships with other organisms, ants use aphids, mealybugs and some caterpillars to get "honeydew", a liquid with a very high percentage of sugar.



posted on Mar, 26 2012 @ 04:24 PM
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reply to post by ArMaP
 

Technically speaking, don't bees also farm?



posted on Mar, 26 2012 @ 05:06 PM
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I don't know about sheep but I always found weird, close to impossible, for cows, pigs and chicken to survive in nature.
They have nothing to defend themselves and, other than chickens, they don't multiply fast.

Someone earlier said sheep tasted good, I bet he never tried it!



posted on Mar, 26 2012 @ 05:32 PM
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reply to post by IAMTAT
 

I don't think so, as bees do not take care of the plants.



posted on Mar, 26 2012 @ 05:36 PM
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reply to post by ArMaP
 

Indirectly, bees help polinate the plants from which they collect.



posted on Mar, 26 2012 @ 05:39 PM
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Originally posted by User8911
I don't know about sheep but I always found weird, close to impossible, for cows, pigs and chicken to survive in nature.
And if you think of buffaloes, wild boars and pheasants?
Don't they survive in the nature?


Someone earlier said sheep tasted good, I bet he never tried it!
It does taste good, after being cooked, obviously.



posted on Mar, 26 2012 @ 05:44 PM
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reply to post by IAMTAT
 


Yes, but that's a secondary effect of the bees' daily work, they do not, for example, choose the better plants to do the best pollinating, while ants take care of the fungus, changing their actions to keep the fungus in its best shape.

I don't think that bees can even be called something like "involuntary farmers", as they only do part of what the plants need, ignoring everything else.



posted on Mar, 26 2012 @ 05:58 PM
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reply to post by ArMaP
 

As long as we are on the subject of creatures other than man that farm, lets add the Damsel fish, which cultivates and protects it's algae crops, Marsh snails which actually 'hoe' grooves in leaves with their tongues in order to cultivate fungus, as well as certain species of Jelly fish.



posted on Mar, 26 2012 @ 06:08 PM
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reply to post by IAMTAT
 


Now, seeing all those species' way of living, do you think that their gods gave them the fungus, for example?



posted on Mar, 26 2012 @ 07:32 PM
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reply to post by ArMaP
 

Not mutually exclusive. I think we still cannot rule out outside influence where man is concerned...especially when considering the sumerian and biblical historical record.



posted on Mar, 26 2012 @ 07:45 PM
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reply to post by IAMTAT
 


But we can rule out outside influence when speaking of ants? Why?



posted on Mar, 26 2012 @ 08:13 PM
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I see that someone already brought up that Corn came from Teosinte, varities of which still exist in Southern Mexico and into Central America.

One search netted me a graphic of Teosinte, Corn and a hybrid.



What gives me pause is anything linked to Sitchen, who I'm convinced spread bad information to sell his books for so long that people came to believe it, even though those qualified to do the translations consider him a crackpot. Sitchen made the evidence fit the theory instead of basing a theory on evidence. In my opinion a tactic often used by hoaxers and such with an agenda to deceive for profits.

People are way to easy on Sitchen and his nonsense. Look at all the insanity and misinformation it has lead too. It only take half an effort to discover that Sitchen was full of it, to be polite.


edit on 3/26/2012 by Blaine91555 because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 27 2012 @ 03:56 AM
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Originally posted by ArMaP

Originally posted by consigliere
No other creature (maybe im wrong) farms.

As previously posted by Flavian, some ants (the leafcutter ants) have fungus farms, as do ambrosia beetles and some termites.

In their relationships with other organisms, ants use aphids, mealybugs and some caterpillars to get "honeydew", a liquid with a very high percentage of sugar.


Thanks for the detail i was so clearly lacking - you swine!


Pretty amazing creatures really. And just to think i was never very nice to ants as a kid.......i worry about my post nuclear holocaust chances!



posted on Mar, 27 2012 @ 06:13 AM
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off-topic post removed to prevent thread-drift


 



posted on Mar, 27 2012 @ 07:52 AM
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reply to post by ArMaP
 

Setting aside for a moment whether the imperative for survival is internal or externally imposed...and leaving the likes of Sitchin and the written sumerian historical record on the shelf, the main difference between ant and man, at least where farming is concerned, is the simple fact that, in man, farming is a learned skill and not innate; human infants are not born with the instinct and fully-developed ability to farm, whereas their entomological counterparts arrive in the world (post cataclysmic or otherwise) fully skilled in the art.



posted on Mar, 27 2012 @ 08:30 AM
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One additional point for consideration...Of the seven or eight species mentioned in this thread, which exhibit farming skills, I find it interesting that humans are the only mammal.



posted on Mar, 27 2012 @ 09:20 AM
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Of course, after the deluge man could have been taught farming from watching Marsh Snails (rather than Anunnaki)...but that might have required a great deal more time and patience (probably two elements in short supply at the time where survival was imperative
).
edit on 27-3-2012 by IAMTAT because: spelling



posted on Mar, 27 2012 @ 10:22 AM
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Originally posted by IAMTAT
reply to post by Swills
 


I was refering to Sitchin's translation from The Lost Book Of Enki.
I will try to find the exact quote to post here. If anyone can find it sooner...please post.


How is that book anyway? I am curious about reading it, even though some of his stuff is kind of out there, and I think he misinterprets a lot but I still think his booksare a fun read. I am reading, "the End of Days", and it is highly entertaining.



posted on Mar, 27 2012 @ 11:23 AM
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Originally posted by IAMTAT
reply to post by HappyBunny
 

Perhaps,...hence the possible need to import sheep and other highly-evolved grains from their original planet.



Are you saying that sheep didn't exist on Earth before then?

Same reasoning applies. The sheep would die, too.

Look up mouflon and the evolution of bovids.



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