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Were Ancient Alien Animals Brought To Earth For Man To Domesticate?

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posted on Mar, 27 2012 @ 11:31 AM
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After the Flood, almost every land based animal had to be brought down. So the E.den (Northeastern Africa) could begin crop production for the Adamu. This is why Noah was told by E.A (He whose house is water) to take the genetics and animals in to the Ark.




posted on Mar, 27 2012 @ 11:44 AM
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reply to post by HappyBunny
 

All I am saying is that the sumerian written record states that sheep were brought down to earth for humans.
As for mouflon, research points to them not being a DIRECT ancestor of modern sheep...and that it indicates that they must have descended from some as yet unknown (or undiscovered extinct) ancestor which originated in the indus valley approx. 10,000 to 8,000 BC.



posted on Mar, 27 2012 @ 11:54 AM
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So my initial point at the beginning of this thread stands as being:

Since the sumerian texts state that the Anunnaki brought sheep down to earth for man after 11,500BC., then it should be a simple matter to finally prove or disprove this assertion by producing evidence of a DIRECT ancestor of the modern sheep, living on earth PRIOR to that time.



posted on Mar, 27 2012 @ 01:05 PM
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We're all here for fun...and we're all friends,...right?
So let me take things a step further:
The sumerian writings point to one "Alalu", who was reported to have been the first intrepid Niburian ancient astronaut to set foot on planet Earth (then officially named "Ki" by the Niburians), approximately 400,000 years ago. Text narrative goes on to give his impressions of the new planet...making note of the abundance of birds, fish and other animals. These observations witness no real personal astonishment over specific animals, beyond their numbers and diversity...until Alalu came upon a snake (which, I believe, it was said that he killed). The story states that this snake creature astonished him, as he had never seen any creature like it in his very long life on Niburu.

Indirectly, this speaks to the presumed understanding that, with the exception of the snake, animal life on Earth and Niburu were strikingly similar in species' form.

If Niburian-domesticated sheep were actually brought to Earth from Niburu by the Anunnaki (possibly as early as 400,000 years ago to use in their early settlements as a food source), then it might also be possible that earthborn sheep ancestors of a similar type may have existed here prior to that time.



posted on Mar, 27 2012 @ 04:15 PM
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Originally posted by IAMTAT
human infants are not born with the instinct and fully-developed ability to farm, whereas their entomological counterparts arrive in the world (post cataclysmic or otherwise) fully skilled in the art.
Not really, ants are not "fully skilled", a recently formed colony of leafcuter ants doesn't show the same kind of efficiency as an older one, and ants are known to learn from examples given by other ants.

But its true that humans are the best (as far as I know) at learning different things in a short time, even if we aren't as fast at doing some of those; our speciality is versatility.



posted on Mar, 27 2012 @ 04:17 PM
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Originally posted by ArMaP

Originally posted by IAMTAT
That said, I would like to know if there is any substantial evidence in the evolutionary record pointing to the specific evolution of sheep on earth before this time.
Considering that there are more species in the Ovis genus, I think that shows that sheep were already part of the Earth's animal population.


Animals are earthlings. More so than us, I believe. They appear to have adapted quite perfectly.



posted on Mar, 27 2012 @ 04:21 PM
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reply to post by IAMTAT
 

I don't think farming is difficult to start.


Imagine some ancient guy picking some fruit, eating it and throwing away the fruits core. As a creature of habits, he used to throw away the discarded cores to the same place, and some time latter he notices that a new plant starts to grow on that place, and it's the same kind of plant as the one that he used to eat.

That would be enough for an inquisitive person to try to repeat the process, throwing away the fruit cores to a different place to see if another plant would appear.

Once he confirmed it, he could try it with different plants, or maybe he would try to understand why that happened, reaching the conclusion that only part of the fruit core was needed, and that part looked the same in all plants, even small grass like plants like wheat.



posted on Mar, 27 2012 @ 04:26 PM
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reply to post by ArMaP
 

Thank you again, ArMaP.
...and the Damsel fish probably also learn their farming skills in schools.



posted on Mar, 27 2012 @ 04:32 PM
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Originally posted by ArMaP
reply to post by IAMTAT
 

I don't think farming is difficult to start.


Imagine some ancient guy picking some fruit, eating it and throwing away the fruits core. As a creature of habits, he used to throw away the discarded cores to the same place, and some time latter he notices that a new plant starts to grow on that place, and it's the same kind of plant as the one that he used to eat.

That would be enough for an inquisitive person to try to repeat the process, throwing away the fruit cores to a different place to see if another plant would appear.

Once he confirmed it, he could try it with different plants, or maybe he would try to understand why that happened, reaching the conclusion that only part of the fruit core was needed, and that part looked the same in all plants, even small grass like plants like wheat.


Your example is a very good one. It is certainly quite possible human farming was learned as you say.



posted on Mar, 27 2012 @ 04:49 PM
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Perhaps if there are any taffs arround (Welsh) you could ask them about the sheep thing. As they are known here in the UK to love sheep and have done for many years.
Not sure about the corn part in this. Although I read some where about the mayans. That their god brought them out of the trees and introduced them to farming. After the last change of the calendar. Some thing about their world ended with water and they survived in the mountains or high trees? I`m not sure if it was a Von Daniken book. Any way it went on to say the during a famine, they were attacked on the farms. By people who lived in the trees? jungle? Until their god flew away and returned with enough corn to feed every one.



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