The Coca Cola Conspiracy: The secret cause for the U.S. obesity epidemic

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posted on Jan, 28 2012 @ 09:39 PM
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reply to post by fulllotusqigong
 


Amazing, I have to tell you after all my time here i have seen how it can be a direct microcosm of the world around us, more succinctly the people around us, and I am truly floored that I am the only one to have starred your post.

Good for you for looking and thinking outside the box. Link me to all your information, this is important and I for one am tired of the 'example' the world is using of the American people and making ignorant generalizations instead of doing the research for themselves or simply paying attention and holding a focus long enough to see reality as it is.
edit on 28-1-2012 by antar because: (no reason given)




posted on Jan, 28 2012 @ 09:47 PM
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reply to post by Stormdancer777
 


You know, its funny I think GMOS create the need to feed at night as well, I enjoy going without all day long and no matter how little I eat at night it still has the same affect as gorging all day long would. Perhaps it is part of some weird vampire type anomaly in the system. Anyway, these obesity reports are spreading literally around the world and the worst victims are the little children. It is horrible when little kids have to watch what they eat like super models.



posted on Jan, 28 2012 @ 09:52 PM
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Originally posted by daskakik
reply to post by fulllotusqigong
 



I posted information that shows that both sugar cane sugar and HFCS are just as bad.


edit on 28-1-2012 by daskakik because: (no reason given)


A sweet problem: Princeton researchers find that high-fructose corn syrup prompts considerably more weight gain




A Princeton University research team has demonstrated that all sweeteners are not equal when it comes to weight gain: Rats with access to high-fructose corn syrup gained significantly more weight than those with access to table sugar, even when their overall caloric intake was the same.



posted on Jan, 28 2012 @ 09:52 PM
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Originally posted by fulllotusqigong
That's you writing a 12 pack is half a pizza. Well it depends on what kind of pizza. You first stated cheese pizza and then you changed it to Pepperoni. haha. Cheese has 150 per slice and Coke as 55.

Sure I was defining what a pizza is. I don't know of anyone other than kids and vegetarians that don't get at least one other topping on their pizza. This would probably be what people would be consuming.


So the question is does drinking a coke make a person thirsty. The answer is obviously yes. 150 calories with the same amount of sodium found in 350 calories for half a slice of pizza.

No it isn't because although the average water has 17 mg there are people who's tap water has more than cokes 55 mg per can and I'm pretty sure tap water doesn't make them thirstier.


The second point and the most important one is that the sodium hides the sweetness.

It isn't enough to hide 39 grams of sugar.


O.K. it's pretty obvious. So comparing water to something that has let's see 17 to a liter for 55 for 1/3 a liter so that's 150 compared to 17 -- o.k. so water has ten times less sodium.

So you ask does water make you thirsty if it has ten times less sodium than a coke?

According to your logic water with 150 times less calories (actually the calories are 0 but if we devide by 0 the world explodes) and 4.5 mg would be 12.5 times the thirst production. Or we can just agree that mgs of sodium in 12 fl. oz. doesn't do anything.
edit on 28-1-2012 by daskakik because: (no reason given)
edit on 28-1-2012 by daskakik because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 28 2012 @ 09:55 PM
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Originally posted by daskakik
reply to post by fulllotusqigong
 


Sorry but +/- 5% doesn't change pure wholesome organic sugar into toxic poison.

This is from a blog but it cites refrences Cane Sugar & High Fructose Corn Syrup Are Equally Bad For Your Health and people who like sweets will continue to seek them out with or without coca-cola co,'s help.


"These rats aren't just getting fat; they're demonstrating characteristics of obesity, including substantial increases in abdominal fat and circulating triglycerides," said Princeton graduate student Miriam Bocarsly. "In humans, these same characteristics are known risk factors for high blood pressure, coronary artery disease, cancer and diabetes."



"Some people have claimed that high-fructose corn syrup is no different than other sweeteners when it comes to weight gain and obesity, but our results make it clear that this just isn't true, at least under the conditions of our tests," said psychology professor Bart Hoebel, who specializes in the neuroscience of appetite, weight and sugar addiction. "When rats are drinking high-fructose corn syrup at levels well below those in soda pop, they're becoming obese -- every single one, across the board. Even when rats are fed a high-fat diet, you don't see this; they don't all gain extra weight."



posted on Jan, 28 2012 @ 09:59 PM
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reply to post by daskakik
 


"Our findings lend support to the theory that the excessive consumption of high-fructose corn syrup found in many beverages may be an important factor in the obesity epidemic," Avena said.



Second, as a result of the manufacturing process for high-fructose corn syrup, the fructose molecules in the sweetener are free and unbound, ready for absorption and utilization. In contrast, every fructose molecule in sucrose that comes from cane sugar or beet sugar is bound to a corresponding glucose molecule and must go through an extra metabolic step before it can be utilized. This creates a fascinating puzzle. The rats in the Princeton study became obese by drinking high-fructose corn syrup, but not by drinking sucrose.



posted on Jan, 28 2012 @ 10:00 PM
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just to weigh in... 5'10 and a hard 180lbs.... about 10% body fat... so, i say bull, i drink about 3 cans of coke a day...
but im also active, and work out about three times a week for an hour or two... maybe lack or physical activity is the problem... geez theirs like 150 cals in a can of coke.. id burn that off just going to the store to buy it... My mom use to say when you point a finger at someone, take a look at your hand because there are three fingers pointing back at you.. own up!



posted on Jan, 28 2012 @ 10:02 PM
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RAW VEGAN FTW

liferegenerator on youtube for all the secrets

check out lou corona also, on healing with foods / fasting



posted on Jan, 28 2012 @ 10:07 PM
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There is a scene in the movie "enemy of the state" (staring will smith), they were in a car and talking about how the other guy gets impulsive/tempered if he was low of blood sugar.

I always had a question mark in my head about this. It was odd to me, does this has a corelation with the theme of this thread?



posted on Jan, 28 2012 @ 10:11 PM
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reply to post by daskakik
 


There's no HFCS in water -- the calories in coke is from the HFCS. The point of the sodium is to hide the corn syrup. Calories from corn syrup are not the same as calories from cheese and meat in pizza.

So yeah pizza has more sodium, more calories and less HFCS -- most pizza does have HFCS either in the sauce or the crust.

Pizza has HFCS in it.

So eating a pizza is like drinking a coke -- because pizza does have HFCS.

Comparing water to Coke and Pizza based on the sodium levels and calories ignores the crucial factor in the discussion:

HFCS.



posted on Jan, 28 2012 @ 10:15 PM
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Originally posted by coyote66
There is a scene in the movie "enemy of the state" (staring will smith), they were in a car and talking about how the other guy gets impulsive/tempered if he was low of blood sugar.

I always had a question mark in my head about this. It was odd to me, does this has a corelation with the theme of this thread?

Yep.



A 2007 study (Lenoir M, Serre F, Cantin L, Ahmed SH ), found that intense sweetness surpasses coc aine reward even in addicted and drug-sensitized individuals, leading to increased aggression upon withdrawal and a disruption of the dopamine/acetylcholine reward balance in the brain.



posted on Jan, 28 2012 @ 10:15 PM
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reply to post by fulllotusqigong
 


this is exactly why i never have more than one soda a day, as a teenager i went on this health kick with my parents and completely detoxed from the stuff. so i no longer CRAVE it like i used to. now i just stick to DR. PEPPER if anything at all - hardly any caffeine, lower than others in sugar IE pepsi, coke, mt. dew even - and its a diuretic so it can clean you out at the same time.. im now a healthy 30 year old woman @ 135 lbs normally, 160 when preggers, and 5'4.



posted on Jan, 28 2012 @ 10:17 PM
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reply to post by fulllotusqigong
 


There's always something. A not-so-convincing case that high fructose corn syrup is worse for you than sugar


After eight weeks, three groups of rats weighed essentially the same – the chow-only rats (462 grams on average), the 24-hour HFCS rats (470 grams) and the sugar-water rats (477 grams). But the rats that were able to drink the HFCS solution for 12 hours each day weighed in at an average of 502 grams, a difference that was deemed statistically significant.


So HFCS available only 12 hours each day is bad but any HFCS at a 24 hour convenience store is OK.



posted on Jan, 28 2012 @ 10:21 PM
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Originally posted by fulllotusqigong
[So eating a pizza is like drinking a coke -- because pizza does have HFCS.

That doesn't even make sense. The point of the sodium was supposedly to make you thirstier so you would drink more coke. Nothing to do with HFCS or caloric content. That was what you tried to say when I first pointed out that drinking a coke is not like drinking pizza.

Your just making excuses for the guy in the vid. Water with 55mg of sodium will not make you thirstier. It is an insignificant amount. That and pointing out the guys error was my point.



posted on Jan, 28 2012 @ 10:22 PM
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Originally posted by uggghhh
just to weigh in... 5'10 and a hard 180lbs.... about 10% body fat... so, i say bull, i drink about 3 cans of coke a day...
but im also active, and work out about three times a week for an hour or two... maybe lack or physical activity is the problem... geez theirs like 150 cals in a can of coke.. id burn that off just going to the store to buy it... My mom use to say when you point a finger at someone, take a look at your hand because there are three fingers pointing back at you.. own up!


If you're a serious athlete then it's different



The answer to health problems caused by sugar, the Swiss scientists say, is simply to burn off sugar calories before they are consumed. woman_running_jogging.jpgThe liver converts sucrose and fructose into glucose. It then chemically combines glucose and water to make glycogen, which it stores as an emergency fuel reserve. Muscles do the same thing, on a smaller scale. A healthy adult usually has about 5 to 10 grams of glucose circulating through the entire bloodstream at any one time. That is enough to provide just 20 to 50 calories for exercise. Any more calories burned have to come from a combination of stored sugars, first, and then fat. Glycogen is turned into glucose to fuel activity, and then it is replenished again after the next meal, at rest. The Swiss scientists recruited cyclists who would ride through the Alps until they were exhausted. They did magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to measure the size of the cyclists' livers before, during, and after the ride. Then when the cyclists were completely exhausted, they were asked to drink beverages made with either fructose or glucose (and in a few instances, a beverage labeled as flavored with milk sugar). The liver scans showed that exhausting exercise depleted the stores of glycogen. Consuming sugar after the ride helped the liver build its stored energy back to normal levels. Two hours after consuming a glucose-flavored drink, the liver increased its volume an average of 2%. Two hours after consuming either fructose or milk sugar (galactose), the liver increased its volume an average of 9%.
edit on 28-1-2012 by fulllotusqigong because: sp.



posted on Jan, 28 2012 @ 10:25 PM
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yeah those sodas are bad for you...


especially diet stuff, avoid it like the plague


fyi




i love you



posted on Jan, 28 2012 @ 10:29 PM
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Originally posted by daskakik

Originally posted by fulllotusqigong
[So eating a pizza is like drinking a coke -- because pizza does have HFCS.

That doesn't even make sense. The point of the sodium was supposedly to make you thirstier so you would drink more coke. Nothing to do with HFCS or caloric content. That was what you tried to say when I first pointed out that drinking a coke is not like drinking pizza.

Your just making excuses for the guy in the vid. Water with 55mg of sodium will not make you thirstier. It is an insignificant amount. That and pointing out the guys error was my point.


Haha. You said you stopped reading after he compared soda to drinking a pizza. If you read further he compares soda to "sweet and sour" Chinese food. He says the salt hides the sweetness in Chinese food just as it does in soda.

So the sodium is both to make the person thirstier and to hide the sweetness.

I realize you're practicing willful ignorance by not listening to the science lecture -- so I have to repeat it for you. haha.



posted on Jan, 28 2012 @ 10:42 PM
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I know a guy that drinks dr. pepper and another into coca cola, they both have rotten teeth, they drink it alot, one has maybe 4 teeth left, this is true, their breath smells like rotten teeth sometimes,



posted on Jan, 28 2012 @ 10:43 PM
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Originally posted by daskakik
reply to post by fulllotusqigong
 



So HFCS available only 12 hours each day is bad but any HFCS at a 24 hour convenience store is OK.


Nope the 24 hour group was worse. Just not "statistically significantly" worse -- except for the females



There's a new paper from a group at Princeton that's sure to add fuel to the debate. They studied the effects on rats of access to high-fructose corn syrup (8% in water) versus 10% sucrose, with unlimited access to normal rat chow, and looked at whether it made a difference if you allowed access for half the day versus the whole 24 hours. Over an 8-week period, the groups diverged significantly. The half-day corn syrup rats put on significantly more weight than the half-day sucrose rats did, even though (most interestingly) the corn syrup group turned out to be ingesting fewer calories from the added corn syrup than the sucrose rats were getting from their sugar water. That is, the difference in caloric intake (and thus the excess weight) was all coming from eating more chow. When the study was extended to six months, it turned out that it didn't matter much if the rats had 12-hour or 24-hour access to the high-fructose corn syrup - by week 3, the weights of both groups had diverged from the controls. (Looking at the graphs, it appears that the 24-hour group may have done somewhat worse, but I don't think they reached statistical significance versus the 12-hours). But that result is in male rats. The females showed what seems to be a much less dramatic effect. Only the 24-hour-HFCS group showed a significant weight difference from the controls. Looking at the fat deposits the rats had laid down during this time shows another gender difference, although it doesn't help clear things up any. The males show a tendency for more fat pad mass, although the only measurement that reached significance was the abdominal fat for the 12-hour-a-day group. The females, although they didn't show nearly as wide a difference in weight gain, had much more significant differences in their fat mass (but only for the 24-hour-a-day HFCS group). Finally, in blood chemistry, none of the groups showed differences in insulin levels. But the both the male HFCS groups had elevated triglycerides, as did the 24-hour-HFCS females. Taken together, it appears that rats (especially males) are able to adjust their caloric intake when given access to small amounts of sucrose, but not so much when given equivalent amounts of HFCS. Earlier work has shown that access to higher levels of sucrose or other sugars, though, will indeed cause rats to gain weight. But not everyone, it seems, even sees these effects. A study from last December looked at a variety of sweetened waters, given to rats 12 hours/day for ten weeks, but only three days out of each week. No differences in weight were seen, although it should be noted that in head-to-head tests, the rats preferred HFCS to agave or Stevia sweeteners. (I wish this group had run sucrose in this experiment, too).



posted on Jan, 28 2012 @ 10:48 PM
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Originally posted by fulllotusqigong
Haha. You said you stopped reading after he compared soda to drinking a pizza. If you read further he compares soda to "sweet and sour" Chinese food. He says the salt hides the sweetness in Chinese food just as it does in soda.

So the sodium is both to make the person thirstier and to hide the sweetness.

I realize you're practicing willful ignorance by not listening to the science lecture -- so I have to repeat it for you. haha.

But the amount is not enough to do either. Do you realize what a small amount of salt is being discussed. If you are repeating what was in the vid then I guessed right that it was the same old inaccurate info that pops up over and over.

I already posted info where the Princeton group's results are suspect. I just made up glass of water with 55 mg of salt took a sip and couldn't even taste it. Added a teaspoon of sugar and tasted quite sweet. You keep listening the the experts though.

Here's info on the dish
2 tablespoons of this sauce has 350 mg of sodium and 13 grams of sugar and even that anount of salt doesn't cover the sweetness in the sauce
edit on 28-1-2012 by daskakik because: (no reason given)






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