The Coca Cola Conspiracy: The secret cause for the U.S. obesity epidemic

page: 27
141
<< 24  25  26   >>

log in

join

posted on Feb, 9 2012 @ 03:19 PM
link   
all sodas are bad for you no matter what type they are not natural and usually have obscene amount of sugar in them and without moderation it can lead to health problems such as diabetes

it's been a long time since I drank Coca Cola and when I went into a deli to pick up a bottle I looked at the label at it said 64g of sugar I was shocked at how much sugar goes into the drink

I will say this though obesity and diabetes can't be blamed on sodas like Coke alone there are many other factors that contribute to this such as our parents and friends, diet and the fact that we live in a world where fast food is our primary food source cause most of us don't know how to cook a proper healthy meal




posted on Feb, 9 2012 @ 03:59 PM
link   
I think people need to take more of an integrative approach to understanding the reason behind modern diseased states, and obesity.

You can't reasonably state that it's merely coke, or GMO, or anything else. We must look at what all has changed since the rates of obesity skyrocketed, and try to limit each novel addition from our diet.

One thing is for sure, our diet has been terribly modified since the industrial revolution. That was less than a dozen generations ago, depending on which point exactly you want to start with.

Problem: We don't have as many nutrients in our soil anymore
Solution: Purchase organic and/or take nutritional supplements

Problem: Much of our foods are heavily processed, and this further strips nutrients, and changes the natural ratio's of nutrients from staple food products
Solution: Don't purchase processed foods. Eat whole foods.

Problem: The average consumption of sugar has skyrocketed over the decades by many fold
Solution: Don't consume so much sugar!! Check labels, and shy away from any products that are loaded with sugar

Problem: Most people aren't as active as they need to be, compared to our ancestors.
Solution: Exercise, silly!! Try to sweat every day.



Seriously, this stuff should be common sense by now. Over a 3rd already have metabolic syndrome, and it seems that once you are in this state, it's difficult to muster up a lot of motivation to make the necessary dietary changes. So for the majority who are yet to succumb to this, get with it already!

Cut out sodas, fruit juice, processed foods, and replace it with whole foods, organic where the budget allows. Try to eat a balanced ratio of macronutrients with every meal. I strive for a little more carbs than protein, and a little more protein than fat.

Make sure your fat is a "good" fat. This just means it does your body better than the "bad" fats. It's better processed, and put to use for everyday use. This includes: medium chain fatty acid sources such as, extra virgin olive oil, and virgin coconut oil. Omega 3 sources such as, hemp seeds, flax seed, fish, and fish oil. Omega 6 sources of gla, such as evening primrose, evening primrose oil, borage oil, black currant oil, and hemp seeds. Stay away from products containing high cholesterol, or trans-fatty acids.

It's not too difficult. Just gotta inform yourself, and stick to a healthy diet.



posted on Feb, 10 2012 @ 03:41 AM
link   

Consuming sugar within this post-exercise window, will negatively affect both your insulin sensitivity and your human growth hormone (HGH) production. A recent study in the Journal of Applied Physiology found that eating a low-carbohydrate meal after aerobic exercise enhances your insulin sensitivity. This is highly beneficial, since impaired insulin sensitivity, or insulin resistance, is the underlying cause of type 2 diabetes and a significant risk factor for other chronic diseases, such as heart disease. In addition, as HGH Magazine explains, consuming fructose, including that from fruit juices, within this two-hour window will decimate your natural HGH production: "A high sugar meal after working out, or even a recovery drink (containing high sugar) after working out, will stop the benefits of exercise induced HGH. You can work out for hours, then eat a high sugar candy bar or have a high sugar energy drink, and this will shut down the synergistic benefits of HGH. … If you miss reaching HGH release during working out, you will still receive the calorie burning benefit from the workout. However, you'll miss the HGH "synergy bonus" of enhanced fat burning for two hours after working out. This is an extremely important fact to remember if you want to cut body fat and shed a few pounds. The University of Virginia research team demonstrated that carbohydrates are burned during exercise in direct proportion to the intensity of training. Fat burning is also correlated with intensity. However, the actual fat burning takes place after the workout, during the recovery. This makes the "Synergy Window," the 2 hour period after a workout, very important in maximizing HGH, once it's released during exercise. … If you are middle-age and want all the benefits from exercise induced HGH, then apply this strategy." Fitness expert Phil Campbell, author of Ready, Set, Go! further explains how you can maximize your HGH production by limiting sugar intake for two hours post exercise, in this article on HowToBeFit.com.


Two Foods You Should Never, Ever Eat After Exercise



posted on Feb, 10 2012 @ 10:09 AM
link   
reply to post by fulllotusqigong
 


There are countless others that say replacing your glycogen stores after they've been depleted is the best thing you can do for your body to maintain an anabolic state and prevent the opposite...a catabolic state.

If you're working out hard enough, your insulin will spike after 20 minutes, and you have an approximate 2 hour window in which high glycemic foods are okay to consume.

Maybe the study had people doing low to medium intensity aerobic exercises only. That would likely be a different story. As for those who are working out at least partly within their anaerobic zone, and doing high-intensity exercises for more than 20 minutes, protein and fast acting sugar is essential for optimal muscle growth, and limited DOMS (delayed onset muscle soreness) the next day.

It's the only time I consume sugar outright. 30 grams whey protein, and 50 grams karbolyn (mixed sourced carbs). I'm definitely growing from it!

From the same article:




There is a very small group of elite and professional athletes who are actively competing, where increasing growth hormone is not their primary goal. For these athletes, consuming some carbs, preferably dextrose-based, in the recovery period is probably a good idea to improve their recovery time, as they are competing and not so concerned about long-term growth hormone levels.


and




When I train young athletes in speed – www.40speed.com - I explain to them that the research shows 20 to 25 grams of protein (within 30 minutes of training) with a 4 to 1 ratio of carbs to protein, starts the recovery process quicker. This advice is given to everyone as general advice in most fitness magazines today and is mostly based on research led by Dr John Ivey on young cyclists who have to perform several days in a row, and a quick recovery during competition is extremely important. Clearly, young athletes more concerned with fast recovery than maximizing HGH release should use this strategy. However, if you are middle-aged, or in a non-competitive phase of training, and keeping HGH circulating as long as possible is your goal, then protein intake (20 to 25 grams after training) is a great strategy, but you need to monitor the glycemic rating of carbs because of the variable impact of carbs on insulin, which in turn impacts the HGH release process. There are a couple of variables that come into play that can change the rules for adults wanting to maximize human growth hormone from exercise. Research shows that a spike of insulin after training increases somatostatin (the hormone that shuts down HGH). So, here's where this issue gets complicated, because it's difficult to estimate the glycemic rating of food on different people with different muscle to body fat ratios. And what makes this issue very complicated is that the insulin producing process is variable for every adult to some degree. It depends on where you are on the Metabolic Syndrome scale. Metabolic Syndrome just became an official medical condition in 2001, and the research shows that even a few carbs can spike insulin for some people with insulin resistance. If you are lean and do not need to drop a lot of body fat, then you can probably eat some carbs without spiking insulin -- and maybe even some refined sugar depending on the interaction of the carbs with an intake of post-training protein, which will somewhat negate the impact of the carbs on the insulin response – as opposed to an intake of carbs on an empty stomach. So, as you can see, there are many variables that come into play. In short, carbs with the protein can be good after training as long as the glycemic response doesn't spike your insulin. Research shows that the insulin response of an individual is lessened with youth and/or lean body weight (muscle vs. body fat), and that's another reason why it's so important to maintain muscle throughout life. From a performance training strategy perspective for runners, I would suggest consider training with the strategy of maximizing HGH release (except on really hot days or on the one-long-run-a-week day) because this strategy should build muscle to make you faster, and reduce body fat so you have less to carry. For competitions, and those hot, long-training days, I'd suggest using the quick recovery strategy of 1 to 4 ratio of protein to carbs, because in this instance, your body does not care what the quality of glucose is; it just needs glucose."


So basically if you're not terribly overweight, and are working out at high intensity, it's best to take carbs and protein directly after workout sessions. If you are overweight, and have metabolic syndrome, then your goals are different (fat loss). This is when you should limit carbs post workout.
edit on 10-2-2012 by unityemissions because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 11 2012 @ 06:59 AM
link   
I just wanted to add that since I watched this video at the beginning of the month I cut out all soda and sweets. I have lost just over 5 pounds in the last 10-11 days. I have had weight problems since i was 20. So hopefully it will keep coming off. Thank you for posting this thread. I hope others have the same results as me.



ps, this is without any other dietary changes. I am still eating high fat/calorie foods.
edit on 11-2-2012 by angelas210 because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 12 2012 @ 02:35 AM
link   

Originally posted by angelas210
I just wanted to add that since I watched this video at the beginning of the month I cut out all soda and sweets. I have lost just over 5 pounds in the last 10-11 days. I have had weight problems since i was 20. So hopefully it will keep coming off. Thank you for posting this thread. I hope others have the same results as me.



ps, this is without any other dietary changes. I am still eating high fat/calorie foods.
edit on 11-2-2012 by angelas210 because: (no reason given)


Awesome!



posted on Feb, 12 2012 @ 03:51 AM
link   
Wow thats pretty crazy, I'm glad sugar, chocolate, ice cream, and basically anything sweet makes me feel sick. Its not that it taste bad to me(well chocolate does) its just that makes me feel sick.

Oh and obligatory joke about how coke a cola should have stuck to coc aine


Anyways I'll spread the word, and keep trying to get my brother to stop sucking down sodas like its the last drop of water in the Sahara desert. It doesn't matter if it says "Diet" on it theres nothing diet about a soda.

EDIT: Oh and I should prolly cut down on the Mountain dew myself. Those things will give you meth mouth if you're not careful!
edit on 2/12/2012 by Mcupobob because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 12 2012 @ 06:06 AM
link   
reply to post by angelas210
 

I am publishing a book in this area (nutrition)...I am not an md, but I have a vast reservoir of scientific studies, books and a theory that will scientifically stand its ground. should you get stuck and need any advice, please feel free to contact me by private message.



posted on Feb, 12 2012 @ 10:58 PM
link   
Coca Cola
12 oz (355 ml) Can
Sugars, total: 39g
Calories, total: 140
Calories from sugar: 140

That is 10 domino sugar cubes per little can.

Who the hell is talking about Coca Cola here, it is sugar water that is the subject.
Go home and put 10 sugar cubes into a cup, pour in who cares how many ounces of water, and down it.
Do it 2 or 3 times a day and get fat enough you cannot fit through the kitchen door to get more.
Moronic logic breeds moronic accusations.
The problem is people.



posted on Jun, 1 2012 @ 12:18 PM
link   

Originally posted by charlyv
Coca Cola
12 oz (355 ml) Can
Sugars, total: 39g
Calories, total: 140
Calories from sugar: 140

That is 10 domino sugar cubes per little can.

Who the hell is talking about Coca Cola here, it is sugar water that is the subject.
Go home and put 10 sugar cubes into a cup, pour in who cares how many ounces of water, and down it.
Do it 2 or 3 times a day and get fat enough you cannot fit through the kitchen door to get more.
Moronic logic breeds moronic accusations. The problem is people.


Well put together. For me personally, it was that number, 39g (or something like that) that put me off a long time ago. That's a ton of sugar. When I did drink sweetened tea, it was just half a teaspoon full of sugar with it. The thought of 39g almost made me puke.

It's a great thread about a real problem, props to the OP.





new topics
top topics
 
141
<< 24  25  26   >>

log in

join