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Atlantis and ISS captured from the ground... in broad daylight!

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posted on Jul, 17 2011 @ 01:16 PM
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In a word..."WoW!

S&F Obviously




posted on Jul, 17 2011 @ 01:20 PM
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reply to post by ngchunter
 


Thanks for answering my question! Again, nice job.

Peace



posted on Jul, 17 2011 @ 01:42 PM
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Fantastic work!
Always meant to do something like that myself.

Now stack a whole bunch of images please. You know you want to.



posted on Jul, 17 2011 @ 01:50 PM
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Amazing video. Never have I seen ISS and a space shuttle together at the same time in daylight. I have been somewhat of a fan of the space program and N.A.S.A. so thanks for posting the vid.



posted on Jul, 17 2011 @ 01:58 PM
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reply to post by ngchunter
 
Damn fine work NG.


Here's a couple of videos of the docking from inside the ISS....and out...





In that last one, it must be a cool feeling to think you were 'down below' capturing your own little place in the history of the Shuttle Missions.



posted on Jul, 17 2011 @ 01:59 PM
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Originally posted by alfa1
Fantastic work!
Always meant to do something like that myself.

Now stack a whole bunch of images please. You know you want to.



I did, but the benefit is always limited when doing ISS tracking; the station moves so fast that your perspective of the station changes very rapidly. You can only stack a few frames within about a second of time before the effect starts to negatively impact the results. Here's the result of stacking 6 of the best frames from a second with decent seeing:
farm7.static.flickr.com...



posted on Jul, 17 2011 @ 02:22 PM
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reply to post by ngchunter
 

Great man! right timing...



posted on Jul, 17 2011 @ 02:24 PM
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looks like a giant white tie-fighter lol, thats an epic footage right thar sir.



posted on Jul, 17 2011 @ 02:44 PM
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Originally posted by ngchunter

Originally posted by alfa1
Fantastic work!
Always meant to do something like that myself.

Now stack a whole bunch of images please. You know you want to.



I did, but the benefit is always limited when doing ISS tracking; the station moves so fast that your perspective of the station changes very rapidly. You can only stack a few frames within about a second of time before the effect starts to negatively impact the results. Here's the result of stacking 6 of the best frames from a second with decent seeing:
farm7.static.flickr.com...


You are really firing me up to take a crack at this sometime.

Great job.

:I kind of just hit reply to your post. I am not necessarily replying about the stacking of the images



posted on Jul, 17 2011 @ 02:57 PM
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what a great work!!!!!
congratulations!!

I tracked ISS a couple of weeks ago, but this daylight footage is of unquenchable beauty.....



posted on Jul, 17 2011 @ 02:59 PM
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Awesome catch and congrats, a well deserved star and flag



posted on Jul, 17 2011 @ 03:12 PM
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Originally posted by Kandinsky
In that last one, it must be a cool feeling to think you were 'down below' capturing your own little place in the history of the Shuttle Missions.


Thanks for the videos! It's really strange to think I'll never see the space shuttle in orbit again, as well as the historic ramifications of tracking it like this. I want to be able to show this to my kids one day in the future when they're old enough to understand it. Even though it turned out that I couldn't attend the launch, at least I was able to help document the final mission in my own way.



posted on Jul, 17 2011 @ 03:19 PM
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reply to post by ngchunter
 


shouldn't it be, erm... in space?



posted on Jul, 17 2011 @ 03:24 PM
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Originally posted by Beavers
reply to post by ngchunter
 


shouldn't it be, erm... in space?

It is. It's just like how you can see the moon even in broad daylight. The moon's just a lot larger, so it's easier to see by naked eye. Technically though ISS is even more reflective per unit of surface area than the moon, thus it has higher surface brightness and is able to achieve a better "signal to noise ratio" in a daylight image than the moon is.



posted on Jul, 17 2011 @ 03:27 PM
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, that's for sure impressive .
A few month ago I watched the moon through a friends telescope.
It was my first time.
Never had I imagined it to be that mindblowing. I got so excited that my heart started to race.
The sight you have captured here would most likely have caused a stroke.



posted on Jul, 17 2011 @ 03:35 PM
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Cool, I saw something the other day during daylight, looked like a sat or something but it was traveling from west to east.

Cool tracker, looks like going to go right over my house today lol.

www.lizard-tail.com...
edit on 17-7-2011 by The Great Day because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 17 2011 @ 03:50 PM
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absolute cracker of a video! Well done sir!


I live in an area where light pollution is rubbish so the chances of seeing the ISS are slim, so this really brings home what im missing



posted on Jul, 17 2011 @ 04:57 PM
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Very impressive well done and thanks for sharing.



posted on Jul, 17 2011 @ 05:01 PM
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Great work!!
As someone who designs control electronics and optical instrumentation at the component/firmware level on a regular basis I have an appreciation for the considerable effort and patience it takes to set up and successfully run equipment like this. cheers!



posted on Jul, 17 2011 @ 05:04 PM
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reply to post by ngchunter
 


I've always waited for the moment when we would be able to see the ISS from the ground with the naked eye. This vid, is just as cool.

That's what they use to say in the 90s during those commercials about NASA.

S'd & F'd.






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