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65 million year old turtle

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posted on Jun, 9 2011 @ 11:08 PM
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Heavy lifting in NJ....




Heavy lifting in N.J.: A 65 million-year-old sea turtle

Paul Ullmann, a Drexel Ph.D. candidate, said several features led him to think the turtle was a Taphrosphys, including the ridged, pebbly texture of its shell surface.

That's a reasonable conclusion, said Tyler Lyson, a Yale University paleontologist who specializes in ancient turtles but was not involved with the New Jersey dig. After looking at an e-mailed photo of the fossil, Lyson said there was little else the creature could be, unless by some chance it turns out to be a new species.


old fossils found... No the dig was not in DC....

lol...




posted on Jun, 9 2011 @ 11:16 PM
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reply to post by ripcontrol
 
Theirs a man that specializes in ancient turtles?




posted on Jun, 9 2011 @ 11:18 PM
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reply to post by ripcontrol
 


How did they determine it was 65 million years old?



posted on Jun, 9 2011 @ 11:18 PM
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reply to post by ripcontrol
 


Taphrosphys sulcatus

went digging...

this came up... Bothremydidae




Bothremydidae is an extinct family of side-necked turtle. They belong to sub-order Pleurodira and order Testudines. Bothremydidae lived in fresh water and were amphibious. They were actively mobile omnivores.


Gloucester County pit... the location...

NJ g county




History

Swedesboro and Bridgeport, were the among the earliest European settlements in New Jersey as a part of the 17th century New Sweden colony. Gloucester dates back to May 26, 1686, when courts were established separate from those of Burlington. It was officially formed and its boundaries defined as part of West Jersey on May 17, 1694. Portions of Gloucester County were set off on February 7, 1837 to create Atlantic County, and on March 13, 1844 to create Camden County.[2] The county was either named for the English city of Gloucester or for Henry, Duke of Gloucester, brother of Charles II of England

Woodbury, founded in 1683 by Henry Wood, is the oldest town in the county.[3] National Park, another town in the county, was the site of the Revolutionary War Battle of Red Bank (now included in a county park) where Fort Mercer once stood. Here can be seen the remains of the British ship Augusta (it is stored in a shed with windows for visitors to the park to look through to see the ship's pieces), which sank during the battle. During the colonial era, Gloucester County's main economic activity was agriculture. In Woodbury (even then the main town) was located the county courthouse, the county jail, a Quaker meeting house (still in existence), and an inn (on the current location of Woodbury Crossings). Because of the county's many creeks leading to the Delaware River and the Atlantic Ocean, smuggling was very common. Today, Gloucester County has a large and diverse population.


and from the original article...

www.philly.com...

pics....



posted on Jun, 9 2011 @ 11:20 PM
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reply to post by XxRagingxPandaxX
 


yeap and he is not the first...


its a good racket if you can stomach it....



posted on Jun, 9 2011 @ 11:21 PM
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reply to post by Lionhearte
 


I make no assumptions on that... Ill ask around unless someone here wish to take this and run...
...



posted on Jun, 9 2011 @ 11:22 PM
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reply to post by Lionhearte
 


Carbon dating?



posted on Jun, 9 2011 @ 11:24 PM
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reply to post by ripcontrol
 


Joseph Leidy



Paleontology

Leidy named the holotype specimen of Hadrosaurus foulkii, which was recovered from the marl pits of Haddonfield, New Jersey. It was notable for being the first nearly-complete fossilized skeleton of a dinosaur ever recovered. The specimen was originally discovered by William Parker Foulke. Leidy concluded, contrary to the view prevailing at the time, that this dinosaur could adopt a bipedal posture. He also described the holotype specimens of Arctodus (A. simus), the dire wolf (Canis dirus), and the American lion (Panthera leo atrox), among many others.[1]

The noted American fossil collector and paleontologist E. D. Cope was a student of Leidy's, but the enmity and ruthless competition that developed between him and rival paleontologist O. C. Marsh eventually drove Leidy out of western American vertebrate paleontology, a field that Leidy had helped to found. Leidy inadvertently contributed to the falling out of the two by showing Cope in the presence of Marsh that Cope had mistakenly placed the head of a fossil Elasmosaurus on the tail, rather than on the neck,[2] and then publishing a correction.[3]

Leidy was an early American supporter of Darwin's theory of evolution, and lobbied successfully for Darwin's election to membership in the Academy of Natural Sciences of Philadelphia.[4]


quite a bright boy it seems...

his name is familiar... I do have one question and since it will com up go to my next post....

also he was one of the first CSI...(I couldnt resist...




Forensic innovator

In 1846, Leidy became the first person ever to use a microscope to solve a murder mystery.[10] A man accused of killing a Philadelphia farmer had blood on his clothes and hatchet. The suspect claimed the blood was from chickens he had been slaughtering. Using his microscope, Leidy found no nuclei in these erythrocytes (human erythrocytes are anucleate). Moreover, he found that if he let chick erythrocytes remain outside the body for hours, they did not lose their nuclei. Thus, he concluded that the blood stains could not have been chicken blood. The suspect subsequently confessed.[10]



edit on 9-6-2011 by ripcontrol because: because abby made me do it



posted on Jun, 9 2011 @ 11:25 PM
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reply to post by Nosred
 


Carbon Dating can only date back 50,000 years, if that?

And it's quite controversial now since the sun is changing rate of decays.



posted on Jun, 9 2011 @ 11:28 PM
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reply to post by Nosred
 


I hate to be a bother but could you post a link to the site where it states they used it for this case...



posted on Jun, 9 2011 @ 11:29 PM
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reply to post by Lionhearte
 


I am buttin in a thread conversation but could you also give me a link to a site that has your argument on the suns variation causing doubt s... I would love to read it... ty



posted on Jun, 9 2011 @ 11:34 PM
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reply to post by ripcontrol
 


I am going here first...


are these the cousins of nessie... I have always been curious if anyone has attempts to id genus/species ect...

good ole nessie



The Loch Ness Monster (Scottish Gaelic Niseag) is a cryptid that is reputed to inhabit Loch Ness in the Scottish Highlands. The most frequent speculation is that the creature represents a line of long-surviving plesiosaurs.[3] It is similar to other supposed lake monsters in Scotland and elsewhere, though its description varies from one account to the next.

Popular interest and belief in the animal has varied since it was brought to the world's attention in 1933. Evidence of its existence is anecdotal, with minimal and much-disputed photographic material and sonar readings. The scientific community regards the Loch Ness Monster as a modern-day myth, and explains sightings as a mix of hoaxes and wishful thinking. Despite this, it remains one of the most famous examples of cryptozoology. The legendary monster has been affectionately referred to by the nickname Nessie[4] (Scottish Gaelic: Niseag)[1] since the 1950s.


I am not trying to mix threads but thought that by me bringing it up I could direct the issue on it better...

The turtle needs some better description but it does not match id's of nessie...



posted on Jun, 9 2011 @ 11:37 PM
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reply to post by Lionhearte
 
Your not by chance bringing religion into this are you? Are you claiming the Earth is 50,000 years old? And that theirs no way this turtle is as old as they say it is because the Earth hasn't been around that long?

Not putting words in your mouth... just asking.



posted on Jun, 9 2011 @ 11:38 PM
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reply to post by ripcontrol
 


Sure thing:

io9.com...



posted on Jun, 9 2011 @ 11:46 PM
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I thought it was found alive at first, then I realized how stupid that sounded... but still, I can't help but picture a turtle with a really long beard



posted on Jun, 9 2011 @ 11:50 PM
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reply to post by ripcontrol
 


I was just taking a wild stab in the dark.



posted on Jun, 10 2011 @ 12:07 AM
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THATS IMPOSSIBLE! Lapras cannot be captured. When you beat Gary in saffron city, theres a guy close to Gary and you talk to him and HE gives you lapras!



posted on Jun, 10 2011 @ 01:49 AM
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Originally posted by XxRagingxPandaxX
reply to post by ripcontrol
 
Theirs a man that specializes in ancient turtles?

17 years on the internet have taught me one thing.
There is a "man" that "specializes" in anything and everything.



posted on Jun, 10 2011 @ 07:34 PM
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reply to post by XxRagingxPandaxX
 


Religion? I search for Truth.
No matter how insignificant it may seem, tiny details are very important, and we all know about assuming.

This article throws out a date like it is meaningless, but I wonder, if it really was, say a 1,000 year old turtle, then how did it get in the middle of N.J.?

What if it was older? Say, 300 million years old? It'd certainly change a few family trees around for the turtles. Maybe even more, if you believe in Evolution.



posted on Jun, 10 2011 @ 07:41 PM
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Originally posted by Lionhearte
reply to post by ripcontrol
 

How did they determine it was 65 million years old?


that was the question I want answered.
me thinks their calculator is broken.

edit on 6/10/2011 by boondock-saint because: (no reason given)



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