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Tornadoes Currently Pounding Appalachian Mountains, Virginia & West Virginia

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posted on Apr, 28 2011 @ 01:49 AM
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HAARP?
Really?
It's called "Tornado Alley" for a reason.
And seriously, if people extended their memories back to the 80s and 90s you'll remember that this weather is far from out of the ordinary for the region.
It's not HAARP, it's called "weather".

edit on 4/28/2011 by dethduck because: Spelling




posted on Apr, 28 2011 @ 01:53 AM
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Originally posted by cybertroy
That's cool, I have some family near there. My grandmother lived not far from Hardees and where Tasti-Freeze used to be, now, there is a Dairy Queen there. She lived out across the longish bridge, near Wal-Mart. Small world.


That's Pearisburg, where WDBJ7 said there was some damage. I don't think anyone would be able to actually go out and confirm it in this weather, so maybe people were calling in to them or something. I don't see how there would be really much there to damage, but the same could have been said of Pulaski.

I'm just staying with family here at the moment. Normally I live just outside of Roanoke. Even though a tornado apparently just went right by here, I still feel safer immediately surrounded by mountains than I would in the Roanoke Valley.



posted on Apr, 28 2011 @ 01:53 AM
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Originally posted by dethduck

It's called "Tornado Alley" for a reason.


'Tornado Alley' is Texas, Oklahoma, Kansas, Nebraska, South Dakota, North Dakota, and parts of Louisiana, Arkansas, Missouri, Iowa, Minnesota, Colorado, and New Mexico. You also have 'Dixie Alley' which is parts Mississippi, Alabama, Georgia, and Tennessee. The Appalachian Mountains, Virginia, and West Virginia are in neither of these tornado alleys.



posted on Apr, 28 2011 @ 01:55 AM
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Originally posted by dethduck
HAARP?
Really?
It's called "Tornado Alley" for a reason.


Nah, Tornado Alley is out West, the Mid-West, Texas, Oklahoma, Missouri, that region.

The Appalachian Mountains are not Tornado Alley. Far from it. We rarely ever get tornadoes here, let alone 2 or 3 separate events within about a 2 week period.



Edit.... Misoir beat me to it.

edit on 28-4-2011 by bsbray11 because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 28 2011 @ 02:19 AM
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Yeah, I always called the whole area Pearisburg when I was a kid.

For anyone reading this, this is "not" part of tornado alley. The thing we can say with certainty, is that this isn't normal for this area, HAARP or not. A tornado here is something you might only hear of once in a while. We live in quite a protected area normally. We have mostly a moderate climate here, we can see extremes, just not often. Earthquakes are rare and tiny. It's a nice area, if you like a little bit of every season.

Troy



posted on Apr, 28 2011 @ 02:35 AM
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reply to post by Misoir
 
Well, egg on my face.

I stand corrected.
Feeling a right idiot thinking for most of my life that it was right along the Appalachian range.
I'm just gonna go now.
I'll be in my bunk



posted on Apr, 28 2011 @ 02:50 AM
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SnF This is good coverage of the goings on. I 've seen funnel clouds coming down in Missouri and Nebraska
before when I was ten. I wasn't afraid but I prolly should've been.

Almost forgot.

Tornados? In the mountains ? Something not right about that.
edit on 28-4-2011 by randyvs because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 28 2011 @ 03:35 AM
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reply to post by bsbray11
 


I live in northeast alabama and one of the long track tornadoes that had been on the ground for an hour came through. It was wild. I have never seen anything like this weather we are getting. First it was a bunch of snow in alabama earlier this year now its an outbreak of severe weather about 2 days out of any given week



posted on Apr, 28 2011 @ 03:49 AM
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reply to post by bsbray11
 


The reason tornados are more common in the midwest has to do primarily with the jet-stream,
which results in the much higher frequency of massive high and low pressure systems colliding.

Topography can play a role-
for better or sometimes, FOR WORSE.



posted on Apr, 28 2011 @ 06:02 AM
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179 dead so far ..


i have heard someone saying that all of these tornadoes
are a sign of the end time

any thoughs on that ??

we have never see that much tornadoes before



posted on Apr, 28 2011 @ 06:05 AM
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reply to post by bsbray11
 





I was under the impression that tornadoes like striking big, open flat areas.


Here in Pa., a few years ago,we had 2 or 3 come through the Pocono area,which is part of the Appalachian.
We also had several come through about 12 years ago. Normally they they do not hit these areas but do occur.



posted on Apr, 28 2011 @ 07:50 AM
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reply to post by bsbray11
 


Amazing that threads where 'Birthers' are still trying to argue that Obama was born in Kenya are on the top page, while REAL news like this is getting ignored here (relatively speaking at least). BTW here is some INCREDIBLE footage of these tornado's (apologies if someone already posted these)








edit on 28-4-2011 by bhornbuckle75 because: trying to embed videos

edit on 28-4-2011 by bhornbuckle75 because: Success in embedding both videos!



posted on Apr, 28 2011 @ 08:12 AM
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Ga here

just wanted to throw in I've lived here 14 years of my life, and this is the first time EVER that we've been getting weather like this. It's already been said before, but this will be the second week that severe weather has made it's way along us, and the next day its windy and cold. Which keep in mind it's spring here..
edit on 28-4-2011 by Nobama because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 28 2011 @ 08:23 AM
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reply to post by randyvs
 


Usually the mountains are more prone to microbursts which can seem very similar to tornadoes, not that i am trying to disprove your comment. These days I can believe most anything is possible.



posted on Apr, 28 2011 @ 08:25 AM
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here in east tennessee last night was not a fun place..... im happy my friends and family are all ok . though we were prepared.....my thoughts are on those less fortunate from last night storm...trully historic is what our local stations are saying.



posted on Apr, 28 2011 @ 08:47 AM
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Originally posted by Mermel
I am in N.C. and am glued to the TV. We have some bad stuff moving through! I don't remember this much severe weather in years! Really creepy and causing me to miss my much needed sleep tonight! Even the air feels heavy and thick!


..I live in N.C. also and was glued to TV all night too. The air outside is very warm and humid. It is very dark for this time of the morning and I have the blinds up and lights on. Not much air stirring at the moment.
Very scary for the people here...we are not accustomed to this type of weather.
edit on 28-4-2011 by ellieN because: Had to add a word to make sense



posted on Apr, 28 2011 @ 08:54 AM
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reply to post by ellieN
 


Look for a greenish yellow glow, that usually precedes hail, strong winds and tornadoes. It is a precursor you can watch for. the humidity is also a clue.

Best of protection to you and yours.

Follow all instructions carefully and find a safe shelter underground because when it happens it happens fast and then its over, but without proper planning you can be injured or worse. The flying debris can be the worst even if you are not hit directly.



posted on Apr, 28 2011 @ 08:58 AM
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Personally I think less of a HARRP situation and more the active sunspot coming into play. This combined with the magnetosphere interacting with our depleted ozone will allow solar winds to get through, mix with humidity and cause excessive winds, lightning and when warm and cold fronts meet, tornadoes.



posted on Apr, 28 2011 @ 09:00 AM
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reply to post by ellieN
 


The other thing to watch for is when you look out at the trees and see them blowing in circles at the tops. You know how they normally blow in the wind, one direction?

Before tornadoes they will swirl in circles.

Also if you look up at the clouds, the lower ones will be moving in one direction and the higher ones will be moving in the opposite. That is one big sign.



posted on Apr, 28 2011 @ 09:10 AM
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Originally posted by Ben81
179 dead so far ..


i have heard someone saying that all of these tornadoes
are a sign of the end time


Honestly? Its more likely a sign of climate change. We had a very warm winter and spring in Tennessee, and I suspected this would lead to strong storms and tornadoes this spring. When cold dry air and warm moist air collide, you get tornadoes.

www.nssl.noaa.gov...


What causes tornadoes?

Thunderstorms develop in warm, moist air in advance of eastward-moving cold fronts. These thunderstorms often produce large hail, strong winds, and tornadoes. Tornadoes in the winter and early spring are often associated with strong, frontal systems that form in the Central States and move east. Occasionally, large outbreaks of tornadoes occur with this type of weather pattern. Several states may be affected by numerous severe thunderstorms and tornadoes.


Now mind you I am not starting the argument over whether or not this is part of a natural cycle, or man made, but..........the warm air that has been responsible for our early spring (it warmed up in middle Tenn in Feb and March) made it very likely that we would get a lot of activity when the cold air that is typical of this time of year continued to swoop down into the central states and collided with the unseasonable warmth.



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