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Security Clearance ID Badge cards?

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posted on Aug, 1 2010 @ 05:11 AM
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What do the ID Security Badge cards look like at Groom Lake or the TNX?
An article on Bob Lazar has a picture of an ID badge, but is that doctored up or is it fake looking?

Ok, I managed to find the pic of the badge here.
www.gravitywarpdrive.com...

Are these same onces actually used over at Groom Lake or TNX?
Thx.

[edit on 1-8-2010 by darpa999]




posted on Aug, 1 2010 @ 06:17 AM
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nobody would know what the badges look like. But being that I have access to certain restricted areas I can tell you that it is probably a generic looking badge related to what sector they work in. And they probably have an EAL with a list of names to verify against the badges. EAL= Entry Authority List



posted on Aug, 1 2010 @ 04:53 PM
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The Area 51 badges have historically been pretty generic looking. You can see pictures of two examples of the genuine article at this website:

roadrunnersinternationale.com...

Scroll down the page. They are next to the Nevada Test Site driver's permit.



posted on Aug, 2 2010 @ 12:08 AM
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Originally posted by darpa999
What do the ID Security Badge cards look like at Groom Lake or the TNX?
An article on Bob Lazar has a picture of an ID badge, but is that doctored up or is it fake looking?

Ok, I managed to find the pic of the badge here.
www.gravitywarpdrive.com...

Are these same onces actually used over at Groom Lake or TNX?
Thx.

[edit on 1-8-2010 by darpa999]


I know for a fact that as of ~2000, CIA badges, and I suspect many government badges which may indicate clearance/status, do not have the person's name on them. They have scannable codes (B&W checkerboard patterns) and chips.

They they are designed to give minimal information to outsiders. There was some general government-wide program to upgrade badges in the mid-late 1990's, and I got a new badge at a DOE lab.



[edit on 2-8-2010 by mbkennel]

[edit on 2-8-2010 by mbkennel]

[edit on 2-8-2010 by mbkennel]



posted on Aug, 2 2010 @ 01:12 AM
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I am guessing based on other Navy security IDs but from my days as a navy security officer.

The two blue stripes are classification levels.
The S4 D5 ETL WX are areas he is cleared to enter. (NAWC China lake uses this system for there areas.)
E-6722MAJ is a code that backs up the other info like classification level and areas he is cleared to enter.
One problem i see is the lack of expiration date i have never seen a Security badge without one. They do not like people using expired badges.

I would like to see the back side.

This does not mean that the ID is real as someone could have copied a real ID from AREA 51 and added Lazar's name.



posted on Aug, 2 2010 @ 02:31 AM
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reply to post by Shadowhawk
 


Is that WJ Fox as in the Fox airport, or coincidence.

I heard a story at the Inn (yeah, BS detector should be on high) that when one of the Rachel locals that worked at the base died, security personal were there to pick up the badge pronto.

I managed to spot a local driving to the base via the back gate. Sadly this guy died as well. (Jim the aircraft mechanic.) He gave his cars to some of the locals. [We're talking heaps here.] I often wondered if they advertised these old cars for sale as "been driving to Area 51" if anyone would believe the ad.

If you wanted to be a pain in the arse, the back gate is where you are more likely to find workers driving to the base. Some live in town. One car left the base and drove to Tempiute. I had no idea anyone lived back there.

There used to be an old junker car near Tempiute with a Nellis sticker in the _ There is an illegal junkyard back that way. It was hauled away the last time I was there.

If there are a million stories in the naked city, there has to be an equal number in the desert.



posted on Aug, 3 2010 @ 12:02 AM
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I would assume they use DoD CAC cards, or something similar. Pretty much everyone in the defense industry has moved to those in recent years.



posted on Aug, 3 2010 @ 03:25 AM
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One thing to ponder is how do the front gate camo dudes know which cars to quickly stop when they pass the border and which cars they let go to the guard shack. Can they really "know" all the cars of the workers and contractors.

RFID?



posted on Aug, 5 2010 @ 02:05 AM
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Originally posted by gariac
One thing to ponder is how do the front gate camo dudes know which cars to quickly stop when they pass the border and which cars they let go to the guard shack. Can they really "know" all the cars of the workers and contractors.

RFID?



They have binoculars so they can check for the DoD decal on the front _

They may also be checking the plate against a list, printed or electronic.

[edit on 5-8-2010 by shmuu]



posted on Aug, 10 2010 @ 06:31 PM
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The DoD sticker is pretty generic these days. You don't even have to be active duty to get one. I don't think they would make a special sticker since they need to keep a low profile.

I've been at the front gate at night and those that are legit seem to go by the border without attracting dude attention. I doubt they are reading plates a night. I have an IR spotlight and the dudes don't seem to react to it, so I don't think they have night vision.



posted on Aug, 10 2010 @ 06:45 PM
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I recently just left a job in a classified environment. My badge had my pic, and was green. Green meant a TS clearance, red meant secret and white meant no clearance. It also had different letters which were for the different places I had access to. It had my name and the expiration date on it too.



posted on Aug, 10 2010 @ 07:06 PM
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My position in DoD disappeared in 1999 after more than several years in DoD.

I had a green lettered ID from a post I was working for when I started. It was called an "any access pass" as the guys in my shop and myself went everywhere to work on stuff. There was a spot for an expiration date, but it didn't have a date typed in. Just a pic and several signatures on a specific organization letterhead type picture in background then everything laminated together.

I later transferred to a post in Kansas City area. I was one of two guys that had the clearance levels to work anywhere without a shadow. That ID was red with some funky 'x' es on it. Had the slide bar for some access points. This was always worn on a lanyard and in plain sight when working in some areas, otherwise a situation could develop. Funny story about that, but not here.



posted on Sep, 11 2010 @ 06:35 AM
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Dunno about underground bases. I could say how they appear to work in general, since I was in the Navy at one time. Dealt with a lot of blueprints and techmans during shipyard periods, things like that. There actually was some interesting stuff, but I can't tell anyone. Not only because of the contract obligations regarding clearances, but because of "CRS". (for those who didn't get it: Can't Remember S...)


General clearance levels usually showed on a clip on badge in the form of badge color. These would cover no-clearance, confidential, secret, etc. Specific clearances are associated with a letter code. (For example, a top-secret in Engineering means diddly-squat regarding top-secret in Crypto or Ops and vice versa. It's very compartmentalized.) Depending on the documents, you also had to log the document check-out/check-in and some cases there's also a pre-printed book with ID numbers and photocopies of the IDs (with the person's picture) to verify against the badges before they could sign-in to check out materials.

Similar procedures were also in place for compartmental access to certain spaces. Sometimes it's necessary to go through security to register for a temporary clearance in order to do equipment work, and in those cases you also were required to be escorted by somebody in that department and/or somebody from security. Their job wasn't only to keep an eye on you, but to make sure any classified materials/info would be secured from sight by anybody else before you could go in and walk around.

Knowing the general protocol around badges probably isn't all that useful for those attempting to be sneaky. Nowadays, I wouldn't be too surprised if they put RFIDs and barcodes on the badges too. Unless you're some kind of virtuoso of social engineering, it's not like you're just going to randomly waltz in somewhere without notice. Security procedures are in place for a reason.



posted on Sep, 13 2010 @ 03:15 PM
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This is a very touchy subject, there are things going on there that go above & beyond what most people would imagine, things that have absolutely nothing to do with "BLACK PROJECT" aircraft, aliens and what-not.
I have seen no mention of the type of I.D. badge I've been shown, the persons credibility was & is genuine.
The person lived in Henderson Nevada, which is just outside of Las Vegas and took what are known "JANET" flights from McCarren's airports international terminal out there. The I.D. badge was >BLANK WHITE< with no visible markings of any kind, but they are there...they can only be seen under the type of light that lines the halls & corridors of the sector of installation that they worked in. "BlacklighT"
There was a small round cut-out at the bottom middle that contained a small microchip that opened inner fence gates and interior doors that the person had clearence to pass through, as well as their own lab door.
Under a "BLACKLIGHT" instead of the thing only glowing a bright fluorescent purple as anything else that was white would, the white simply just went away and became completely irrellevant making visable a hollogram of the persons face, sector # and security clearence #, which I didn't see on the list posted here. The hollogram just jumps off the card at you, now... when I say it jumps of the card, I mean like an inch of the card !
It was the most powerful hologram I had ever seen, when you turn the card from side to side you could actually see the persons head turn back & forth to the point that you could actually even view their profile !
I was told that their's was the absolute highest security clearance that any person who was non-military could EVER hold. They worked in what would be the U.S. verision of Russia's "BIOPREPARAT".
The person was never even once asked to turn the thing in before leaving the facility twelve or thirteen years ago. It took a while before the person even brought up the subject, kind of "NO BIG DEAL" or something, funny huhh ?

edit on 13-9-2010 by alpha68 because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 14 2010 @ 12:11 PM
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I didn't notice at first, but mbkennel mentioned a bar code & chip. There was NO BAR CODE on what I myself saw, I did look at the reverse and it was just plain white & did glow purple under the blacklight as anything white would. The odd thing about the "CHIP" was that it couldn't have been powered because it was way too small for any type of battery, if it was powered I would sure love to know how & what with. The person told me that the labs they worked in were twelve down & the lowest you could go (THE BASEMENT) so to speak.
The badge even set the elevator (NO BUTTONS) to the floor they worked on.
So when anyone would enter the elevator the badge picked the floor that they were supposed to be on and when it stopped at any partictular floor it wouldn't move again until the person with that floors clearance got out, if a person without that floors clearance tried to exit the elevator with a person who did have clearance for the floor an air-horn louder than the BiG-BanG of creation sounded along with light shows all over the place. They couldn't get anywhere inside the complex without one of those badge's no-how.



posted on Sep, 22 2010 @ 02:06 AM
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For the last several years all areas in the government have used a common access cardsometimes called a CAC.
It is an id card, a pass card and computer access card all in one.
Whatever you are allowed to access is programed into the computer system, your card just has two pieces of identifying info on it. All higher restricted areas and data are protected by biometric security devices.
The card says who you are and the computer matches name with data in its banks. No personnel override possible.





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