A Huge Part of History is Missing!!

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posted on Jul, 7 2010 @ 10:53 PM
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reply to post by ghostpigeon
 


You must be a rare kind of teacher! Kudos to you and I'm sure your students will become much more elevated than the average student; even if it doesn't seem to have an impact on them, it does in the long run. Often without them even being aware of it!




posted on Jul, 7 2010 @ 10:55 PM
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reply to post by dreamwalker74
 


A huge part of history isn't missing. It's there, it just hasn't been taught. Nobody is hiding it as your title seems to suggest. It's not like how alexandar bell didn't invent the phone, but that Italian dude Meucci did. That is a deliberate changing of history. This is just ignorance. Simple ignorance because no one cares who invented the microwave just as no one cares who invented the paperclip. It's not that important.

Also nowadays there are multiple people who helped create the invention or the patent went to a company like Westinghouse or something.

No, no conspiracy here. Sorry.



posted on Jul, 7 2010 @ 10:58 PM
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Originally posted by ajmusicmedia
reply to post by ghostpigeon
 


You must be a rare kind of teacher! Kudos to you and I'm sure your students will become much more elevated than the average student; even if it doesn't seem to have an impact on them, it does in the long run. Often without them even being aware of it!


I tend to disagree since the information being given is of no practicle use. So if he teaches who invented the clothes pin he is a great teacher? I'm not trying to cut him down, I'm glad he cares. I just feel there are greater things to care about out there than who made a microwave.

I would much rather see him teaching the Presidents or the countries of the world. Most kids don't know that stuff anymore either.

[edit on 7-7-2010 by Alienmojo]



posted on Jul, 7 2010 @ 11:23 PM
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reply to post by Alienmojo
 

Hey alienmojo, I don't quite get what you're responding to here because I didn't say anything about teaching who invented the clothespin. And you'd be right if you criticized me for teaching that. Other things I mentioned you might also see as irrelevant and that's inevitable, a teacher can't speak to everyone's interests. I mostly was trying to say I use methods to teach history that hopefully will lead people to find some relevance in history to their own lives and so concentrate more methods of inquiry than hard and often trivial facts. So I don't think we have anything to disagree about and I can only thank the one who said I was "a great teacher" for saying so. I appreciated that much, but that's not why I teach. I teach so others will be inspired to learn more for themselves, and that's the truth. More than that I can't really add. Take care.



posted on Jul, 7 2010 @ 11:35 PM
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reply to post by Alienmojo
 


Actually, since I'm just checking back, I saw your post that says nobody is trying to hide anything and there you would be wrong. The teaching of history as much as the writing of history is always hiding something.

And I do speak from working in the profession. Yes, you professors do "hide" history from people quite often. We simply do it by no choice or our own sometimes in having to pick and choose what we get into a curriculum and we also do it consciously at times if we think people couldn't handle this truth or that, or maybe don't have enough evidence to make a case on something, though we feel it's true. That's called being human; that's called being political; that's called being invested in our career to a point when might be willing to shut up to avoid getting dismissed. I don't have that many things at this point in life that I consider worth the personal self-betrayal of not speaking out when I know should, but I have been there in the past.

Academia is uber-competitive and if you're hoping for a tenure track job, you're trained to keep quiet on things too controversial. Since I started that career later in life, I could never quite buy into that, but that's what happens when you spend two-thirds of your life in construction. You learn about the price of selling yourself or anybody else out for a little success. It's not worth it.

Learning to die is as important as learning to live according to both Jung and Freud and I agree with them. Dancing with death is a primal instinct in the human psyche. When I make that dance, I want to go like my father did, with the only thing you can take with you in the last moment: you self-respect.
"



posted on Jul, 7 2010 @ 11:38 PM
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reply to post by ajmusicmedia
 


Thanks ajmuscimedia, I try! Life shouldn't be separate from school and we should be in school, in part, to learn how to live life. The rest is frosting, but that can be pretty damn good too!



posted on Jul, 7 2010 @ 11:46 PM
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Attended public school in Delaware in mid sixties, middle & high in SC. None of these were taught. Never thought of this missing link until your topic. You're dead-on with this concept. Got me thinking also... as much as we use computers in public schools (been working in the system since the mid-80's) no one, to my knowledge teaches of Bill Gates, Steve Jobs, IBM, etc. and their contributions which led to personal computers, school computers, Internet, business applications, etc...

Now that I think about it, kids growing up today probably think genius is a thing of the past, and nobody today is smart enough to come up with a grand new invention. Maybe that's what they WANT them to think... what they wanted US to think!

Hey... git out there an start inventing stuff, people! We need a new sense of synergy (synthesis + energy) in this world of oppression/depression!!!

Or perhaps they'd rather steal our thoughts and invent the stuff themselves. (Actually suspected that as a child... envisioned a whole camp-site Barbie: tent/cooking supplies/sleeping bag and such. The next year, I saw my vision advertised on a commercial!)

Alternate explanation: Collective Unconscious (Jungian Theory I think, after he split from Freud)



posted on Jul, 7 2010 @ 11:52 PM
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reply to post by EnkiCarbone
 


I did my dissertation on the production industry in semiconductors and I know recently I've been hearing "Moore's Law" may be close to playing out, as far as the doubling of processing and the halving of cost factors. I think you're right. I way an article recently on using diamond chips to replace silicon chips or possibly nano fiber optics. Here's a link to the diamond thing:

www.techeye.net...

Then again, inventions often do come of of nowhere, so who knows what will follow. One thing you can be sure of is that after the invention capitalism takes over and the thing will be bought up major corporations and the price won't be set for the cheapness of production, but for what they can get away with charging. Since the 1600s or so, that's the way it runs!



posted on Jul, 8 2010 @ 12:24 AM
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Interesting post, but just because invention isn't being taught in school doesn't mean that that part of history is missing - it just means that teachers either (a) have become sloppy or (b) have way to many things to teach now and consider it more important to teach the way to operate something with a microchip in it rather than its history.

For me, a much larger question is why are so many "artifacts" coming up from deep mines and from rock strata that is obviously millions, and in some cases, billions of years old, with apparently man made tools present before man supposedly was around?

I think we're missing a whole other evolution of intelligent life on this planet, before humans were even considered.

I for one don't believe that the present race of mankind are the first species to evolve on this planet. Archaeology keeps digging up these artifacts and either conveniently ignoring them or just dismissing them all together without any sort of explanation, as these items don't fit the regular "model" of the human timeline.



posted on Jul, 8 2010 @ 12:58 AM
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reply to post by ghostpigeon
 


I've had this gut feeling that it would involve crystals somehow. Diamonds: you couldn't ask for a better source. Now it can be a girl's and a geek's best friend. Thanks for the link


I'm not going to go off on a rant about the industry created price of diamonds as it's counterproductive for this thread.

What I was getting at is that Jumping Jesus Phenomenon, the Wilson thing: (It's been a long time since I've read it, but) it's relevant here somehow. I'm getting the distinct feeling we can no longer keep up with information as it escalates. It doesn't seem as though it's just that there's a conspiratorial effort to suppress historical truths, as much as we are not able to keep up with the tide of information. We've created a network that has become a highly evolved organism to contain it all, making it readily available, but our methods of education are behind in terms of getting with the program. I think of this paradigm as the overflow. If we are adaptive (or biologically if we are evolving, if you believe in that as a reality), then it's evident we are not evolving at a rate in which we can assimilate and integrate information at the rate in which it escalates.

What we deem "the basics" or "the classics" are becoming more and more obsolete and redundant via the social rat race we've created for ourselves. This all sounds pretty obvious, right? Try explaining it to your Congressman. Try telling your idiot Senator it's more logical to computerize your kid's classroom than it is to spend a few billion dollars pushing an anti-tobacco bill nobody wants but him.

We created this problem. Now all we can do is play catch up. I personally would rather have my boys learn Pythagorean Theorem than all there is to know about Lady Gaga. I have a bad feeling that history's greatest and brightest have already fallen by the wayside via lack of room in a textbook, or worse - in the human mind. This has been going on for awhile. I never even heard of Giordano Bruno in High School. I wonder why? Wouldn't advanced mnemonics be... you know... useful to a student?



posted on Jul, 8 2010 @ 01:01 AM
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reply to post by dreamwalker74
 


Agreed!

The school system is ancient. In fact it was already ancient ages ago and has never been on par with it's current days. If you tap into history matters you will see that most if not all the wrong history you've learned in school and are now proven to be wrong are still being lectured in schools.

And unfortunately most of the conspiracy theories fall in category number 2 and are driven and sustained by ignorance.



posted on Jul, 8 2010 @ 01:01 AM
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Originally posted by Phage
reply to post by RMFX1
 

Yes it would be nitpicking. But I didn't say that. His system was unrelated to later technologies.


So then we agree. Baird invented the television.



posted on Jul, 8 2010 @ 01:08 AM
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Thats not all. It's not just who invented what but where things are. Most Americans don't even know their own country let alone where Belize is and what it used to be called. Where Sumba is. Where Albania is and much more.
It's the most educated and yet ignorant country in the world generally speaking. I'm not actually sure what kids learn these days, they come out of school in our country and can't even spel corectlee.



posted on Jul, 8 2010 @ 01:08 AM
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reply to post by babybunnies
 


Where I work, teachers must teach 'the standards' adopted by the state. The 3 things the OP mentioned must be in another ballpark, cause they're not listed in the state standards. (Well, not at the elementary level, where the cotton gin and telephone are listed, that's for sure!)



posted on Jul, 8 2010 @ 01:15 AM
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There is not enough time or energy from sun up to sun down to teach everything that could be useful or how any inventor came to the conclusion of there invention, look at atoms or the atom bomb everybody knows Oppenheimer or others that were in that field of expertize but the concept of atoms can be traced to a Greek named Democritus who lived in 460 BC, as far as we know it could be traced even farther then that but who knows. But imagine that chain of events that lead to the atom bomb, and a lot of other devices that we use. Everything is one long chain of events that influenced different people differently, but now a days its not about who invented what or how its who has the patent on it, after all if one does not make money off it its useless to invent anything. Or this information age does it really matter who invented the microwave, for the average person most things have no consequence in daily life, so who cares who invented the microwave. And if one is a student and has a laptop one can always find out who and how if one cared to know. In fact pretty much almost all can be found out with just a computer and internet and library card, if one so chose to do that. But like I said most info is irrelevant now a days. Or how about this, imagine a future were lets say someone invents a sort of cybernetic chip/brain that can be implanted in anyones brain, were by it functions as part of the brain like a hard drive to store information that is used for whatever reasons, daily life, to how to make a chair or even a tv, and also imagine if this cybernetic brain also gives you access to a sort of internet a world web that is connected to huge main data frames but also all other people on the planet. And this thing is devised in such a way that one could literally telepathically speak to anyone or access any information that they would want, and by the function of this cybernetic brain that is linked to a live brain basically one has the right hemisphere and the left hemisphere of a regular brain but also has a third hemisphere the cybernetic one. In that future scenario what would be the point of sitting in huge classes listening to a dude lecture, the whole world would be rethought. I mean look at what just the internet and computers did to the world, a primitive hive mind that basically changed everything about how we view the world and its changing daily slowly, or fast if one goes by the changes of the past. Oh and a couple pages back some one mentioned the sports scholarship to a guy that was illiterate, I just wanted to say most people would gladly be illiterate if they could make more money and life a more stress free life if they were good at sports, in fact in this civilization one would be way better off with the money then if one was a genius and no money. Hence the rat race, to some knowing stuff is irrelevant as long as one can pay someone else to do that stuff, hence our current Prolification to new things that leave the old behind, what worked in the past will not always work in the future or even present depending on how old one is.



posted on Jul, 8 2010 @ 01:16 AM
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Originally posted by Sinterklaas
reply to post by dreamwalker 74
 


But they are mentioned. You can read in every article on a new discovered breakthrough, all the names of those responsible. There is however not a singe product that does not consists from several technologies, which are mixed or embedded to perform a new trick.

I can imagine a lesson would be like,

Teacher: Who invented the microchip ?
Student:
Bill gates.

Teacher: No, that is incorrect. The microchip was invented by these people. { List of countless names } I'd like you to study them and you can expect a test next Monday.
Don't fail it, this one counts as a final.

Student:


PS.
The role play was how I would think this would take place. It was not meant to offend or ridicule.



My apologies if this has been brought up but Ive heard some confusion about the jump to microchips and fiber optics and claims that these came from the Roswell crash. It is hard to believe we went from vacuum tube tech to those in one leap those years after Roswell.
Does anyone know more about this?

[edit on 8-7-2010 by Overtime]



posted on Jul, 8 2010 @ 02:30 AM
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You know what disapear from history ?

American people before european people coming to america ...
American people which history is 3 hundred years , it is easy to learn ... and before that ? hum ?
At least this is just : A People's History of the United States, but before ?


A lot of thing does not appear for the education of children for two obvious reason :

1. THe elite think they have to create a nation, so they don't talk about other country history ( or the story of european people before , american history ). But they create also "nationnalism", and "right wing poor people" with a lot of anger.
2. The elite don't wont people to have critical thinking : and information is power, so they don't give much "information"/ education (real education).

Are we in orwell 1984 : yes



posted on Jul, 8 2010 @ 05:13 AM
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reply to post by dreamwalker74
 


Interesting angle but I think we're realizing too, we can't trust what we read either. Many things written (or taught) are later found out to be lies, theories, propaganda or simply just wrong.

I also think people tend to work in teams opposed to individuals working in their basements like years ago. But when they do ( like genetically engineered Monsanto) it's for the betterment of the Elite, not me or you!
Besides, solo (individuality) thinking is extremely discouraged and deemed radical and conspiratorial now-a-days as well ("You're either with us or you're a terrorist") and the Lemming mentality is deeply encouraged!


By the by OP? It's 'piqued' not 'peaked'. Just thought I'd point that out.
Peace~



posted on Jul, 8 2010 @ 05:34 AM
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reply to post by earthdude
 


from what i understood the micro wave was born out of the military trying to figure out how to comunicate and transmit data without it being intercepted and it might also have had something to do with radar then as a pure coincidence they realised it vibrated water molecules at a certian wavelength which caused friction which caused heat and the civilian spin off after it was used for military microwave ovens was our micro wave oven ive also read and reasearched some material where essentially microwave or rather RF energy can be or is used as a form of propulsion like anti gravity as far as it can moleculary agitate or change or create an elecromagnetic field
id also like to say that up until world war one all the great inventions were made with civilian life in mind "for the people" and they were the dreamers of dreams back then during and after the war well pretty much every invention was based or invented for a military application and years later normal everyday society got the spin offs and variants of it and it also kinda developed half life status in reverse that is to say at the higher above top secret levels we most definately have made and do fly UFO advanced antigravity and interdimensional transport
furthermore look at tesla and other inventors whome have craked free energy 40 plus years ago or advanced propulsion they always have either dissapeared or there work has been sealed up publically and nothing has ever trickled down into civilian use
one fact we must all consider further is this look at all the money "we" know about they have spent on space exploration and monitoring and consider what we have spent on discovering our own planet then realsie they just junked the space shuttle and theres nothing to replace it other than 60 year old rocket delivery and capsule return
i pose a question lets say aliens are real and they have crashed here or there and had there stuff recoverd and reverse engineered and we now use similar craft at above top secret level to travel much the same as aliens would i mean there looking for something in space or watching it and the fact there is no confirmed replacement for the space shuttle has to tell you something all of a suddne technology stopped or went backwards
great thread by the way and all things considerd were lucky if they tell us or reveal anything to us at all but one thing i do know for a fact
one day we shall all know the TRUTH and the TRUTH shall set us all free.



posted on Jul, 8 2010 @ 06:09 AM
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Originally posted by RMFX1

Originally posted by Phage
reply to post by RMFX1
 

Yes it would be nitpicking. But I didn't say that. His system was unrelated to later technologies.


So then we agree. Baird invented the television.
This is my post on page 2 of this thread:

Baird did indeed invent a television system, but it used a mechanical scanning system. Two Americans, Zworkin and Farnsworth invented electrical scanning devices a short time later.

Bairds device was ingenious, but impractical.

If you just want pictures transmitted over the air.....from here:






On December 2, 1922, in Sorbonne, France, Edwin Belin, an Englishman, who held the patent for the transmission of photographs by wire as well as fiber optics and radar, demonstrated a mechanical scanning device that was an early precursor to modern television. Belin’s machine took flashes of light and directed them at a selenium element connected to an electronic device that produced sound waves. These sound waves could be received in another location and remodulated into flashes of light on a mirror.





The iconoscope was an electronic image scanner - essentially a primitive television camera. Farnsworth was the first of the two inventors to successfully demonstrate the transmission of television signals, which he did on September 7, 1927, using a scanning tube of his own design. Farnsworth received a patent for his electron scanning tube in 1930.






Another player of the times was John Logie Baird, a Scottish engineer and entrepreneur who 'achieved his first transmissions of simple face shapes in 1924 using mechanical television. On March 25, 1925, Baird held his first public demonstration of 'television' at the London department store Selfridges on Oxford Street in London. In this demonstration, he had not yet obtained adequate half-tones in the moving pictures, and only silhouettes were visible.' - MZTV





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