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Why join the freemasons?

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posted on Oct, 10 2010 @ 10:01 AM
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Question! Is there a religious/social/moral reason why women are not recognized as frremasons even if they join Daughters of the Nile? I think it might have something to do with them being too emotional and weak, and that they're originally not warriors like men are, but I don't want to come off as too chauvanistic I'm just curious. After all, curiousity is what got me here.




posted on Oct, 10 2010 @ 10:23 AM
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Originally posted by network dude
#6 (minus the beer)


I don't know if I'd fit in well in your lodge.......
edit on 10-10-2010 by froggee because: formatting.



posted on Oct, 10 2010 @ 10:28 AM
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reply to post by Haydn_17
 


Can I get back to you on this one, as I am about to perform the masonic duty of being a selfless person on this fine day of Thanksgiving.

Freemasonry... where good men learn to become better men. That is all.

I am a third degree master mason. I have just recently decided to take a break from the craft, submitted a formal demit of good standing, and have voiced to my fellow brethren that I am adjusting my life priorities at this time to focus on other things. Will I come back to experience the secrets and mysteries of Freemasonry? Probably... But not right now.

To the Queen and the Craft... Happy to meet, sorry to part, happy to meet again.

I'll get back to you on this... Promise.
Cheers



posted on Oct, 10 2010 @ 12:53 PM
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Originally posted by AugustusMasonicus

Originally posted by network dude
...#6 (minus the beer)...


*cue sad violin music*

You make this too easy.


there I was, thinking that a fellow brother would never kick a man whilst he was down, and then there that is.


For those that don't get this joke, in NC, there is no alcohol allowed in masonic lodges. We can drink outside the lodge, just not in it. Up north in the devils playground, apparently anything goes.



posted on Oct, 10 2010 @ 12:59 PM
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Originally posted by ohsnaptruth
Question! Is there a religious/social/moral reason why women are not recognized as frremasons
Religious? Nope. Moral? Nope. Maybe social, if anything. It's a fraternity. There have been groups I haven't been able to join because I was male, so I don't think anyone should take it too personally. I just think that if it were purely mixed, there would probably be a shift in what it is and what it does. Not saying such a shift would be good or bad, but it would be different.



posted on Oct, 12 2010 @ 08:42 PM
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reply to post by JoshNorton
 


I wonder what women do in no-men-allowed groups...
*thinking* ...
...................
.



posted on Oct, 13 2010 @ 06:11 AM
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reply to post by ohsnaptruth
 


Talk about men, complain about their hubbies and wonder why they are not allowed in "men only" organisations. Oh, and laern how to use urinals whislt standing up (you have to see it to believe it).



posted on Oct, 13 2010 @ 05:28 PM
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why weren't blacks and other minorities allowed in until there was a prince hall branch of masons?



posted on Oct, 13 2010 @ 06:24 PM
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reply to post by abcddcba
 


the same reason that people had slaves. They were ignorant and thought that people who looked different then them we less intelligent. Slowly but surely, that is being fixed. Slower than others in some places.



posted on Oct, 13 2010 @ 08:02 PM
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reply to post by abcddcba
 

Times have changed in the last few hundreds years. Prince Hall still exist, but mostly out of tradition than anything, but most states support the PHAs.



posted on Oct, 14 2010 @ 10:43 PM
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reply to post by Saurus
 





I, personally, learned theology from the Roman Catholic Church. I learned philosophy from my mother, a Buddhist. I learned morals from my father. I learned love from my wife. I learned esoteric knowledge through books. I learned science and grammar from school and university. I learned how they all fit together through Freemasonry.


You can't "learn" love, neither morals. Esoteric knowledge, even less, there is nothing to "learn", just things to "know". Nothing "fit together", and even if it was, you won't see it, even for a second, because you are just a man, and not even a free one, because you are a mason.



posted on Oct, 15 2010 @ 03:52 AM
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reply to post by abcddcba
 


Please correct me if I am wrong, but I think that "blacks" were always welcome in the British Lodges. Contrary to popular belief, blacks have held prominant positions in British society for hundreds of years. It is even said that 10% of all white lliving in the London area can trace some black heritage in their families.

It is the man that is important, not his colour, creed, race or religion.



posted on Oct, 15 2010 @ 08:18 AM
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Originally posted by moltquedelo
You can't "learn" love, neither morals. Esoteric knowledge, even less, there is nothing to "learn", just things to "know".


A baby who is loved learns to love. A child who grows in a good moral home learns to be just and upright later in life. I believe that these values are learned from your parents - they are not due to genetics, neither are they just 'there'. This is why children from dysfunctional homes become criminals. Children who are abused become child abusers. They have learned it.


Nothing "fit together"


Perhaps we see things differently, then. Here is a quote to illustrate how I feel about life...

"There are parts of a ship which taken by themselves would sink. The engine would sink. The propeller would sink. But when the parts of a ship are built together, they float. So with the events of my life. Some have been tragic. Some have been happy. But when they are built together, they form a craft that floats and is going places. And I am comforted."
~ Ralph W. Sockman


, and even if it was, you won't see it, even for a second, because you are just a man, and not even a free one, because you are a mason.


Pardon my use of yet a second quote, but some people have the eloquence of angels, and they can say in a few words what I would use pages trying to say. This about sums up my thoughts on being 'just a man'...

“We look at some people as if they were special, gifted, divine. Nobody is special and gifted and divine. No more than you are, no more than I am. The only difference, the very only one, is that they have begun to understand what they really are and have begun to practice it.”
~ Richard Bach



posted on Oct, 15 2010 @ 08:08 PM
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Originally posted by network dude
reply to post by abcddcba
 


the same reason that people had slaves. They were ignorant and thought that people who looked different then them we less intelligent. Slowly but surely, that is being fixed. Slower than others in some places.


Could you elaborate on this please?

My perception, and I apologize if this is wrong, is that Freemasonry is still largely a segregated organization. Blacks have their Prince Hall lodges and most, but not all of the white lodges "recognize" them but by and large white and black Freemasons attend separate lodges. This, to me, harkens back to the "separate but equal" policies of the Jim Crow era.

Since I otherwise have a positive impression of Freemasonry the lingering odor of segregationism is the main thing that keeps me from having an overall positive impression of them. Do my views need adjustment on this matter?



posted on Oct, 15 2010 @ 10:52 PM
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reply to post by plnelson
 


I hate to start this, but I guess it's here. Racism is still a part of ourt society. Freemasons are made up of members of society. None are perfect. I have seen old school racism from some, and open inteligent brotherly love from others. I think it may be a bit more one sided in some places. Some for the better, and some for the worse. But in my area, the segregation is mutual. Prince hall lodges would rather remain the way they are than start opening up no matter what the grand lodge says. It's a two way street. It will take the work of a few to brave the stupidity of multitudes. Patience.



posted on Oct, 16 2010 @ 12:06 AM
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Originally posted by plnelson
Since I otherwise have a positive impression of Freemasonry the lingering odor of segregationism is the main thing that keeps me from having an overall positive impression of them. Do my views need adjustment on this matter?
Every lodge is different. Two lodges who meet in the same building, just on different nights, might have widely separate demographics. As my brother above says, it all depends on the people involved. No segregation in my lodge though.We've got blacks, whites, hispanics, christian, jewish, muslim, gay and straight men all meeting as equals without prejudice. It's sad that our lodge may be a rarity in actually living by such Masonic principles, but I know I made the right choice in finding this group of men.



posted on Oct, 18 2010 @ 12:04 PM
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Originally posted by network dude
reply to post by plnelson
 


I hate to start this, but I guess it's here. Racism is still a part of ourt society. Freemasons are made up of members of society.


Yes, but...

As an engineer with a science background I'm a member of many professional societies and organizations. I'm also a member of lots of other organizations for artists, environmentalists, poets, sports and athletics organizations, etc. (I'm a "joiner")

ALL of these are "made up of members of society" and ALL of them have items in their charters or by-laws prohibiting racial discrimination. It would be unheard of for a chapter of IEEE or ACM or the Audubon Society or the Appalachian Mountain Club or whatever to have a whites-only or blacks-only policy, and absolutely would never be tolerated by the organization.

In other words it's irrelevant that society has racists; it doesn't follow that organizations, clubs, or other such entities need to tolerate racism in their organization.



posted on Oct, 18 2010 @ 12:54 PM
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reply to post by plnelson
 


I am going to say this as professionally as I can but be honest. There is no rule about race in masonry at all. therefore on the books, any man can join providing it is of his own free will, he is not a fellon, and he comes well recommended. That being said, there was a reason for Prince Hall masonry to have started in the first place. Part of that reason was that a black man would not be voted into a regular lodge at that time. Times have changed and attitudes have improved. In most states, you will find very little if any separation between races in lodges. But if you look a bit further, you will find a few states who still refuse to recognize Prince Hall masonry. My state (being incredibly progressive) voted to recognize Prince Hall masonry almost three years ago. A few still are holding out. You will never guess where those states are.

Even though my state recognizes Prince Hall masons now, you will find some areas that would find any way possible not to admit a black man into their lodge. The rules say there should be no problem, but the reality is rules can be bent. This will change in the not so distant future. The old timers will die out and the last bit of folks who may have used white sheets for more than sleeping on, will eventually go by the way side. But in my quest to find a solution to this problem, I have found that in this area, I wouldn't be very welcome if even allowed into a Prince Hall lodge. Same deal. I can't say I blame them, but this insanity has to stop somewhere. I only hope I am alive to see it.

Please don't read into what I have said that masonry is inherently racist, because it is not. Our precepts are written to accept a man for his internal qualities and not his external. I take that to mean much more than rich or poor. Some have a way of adjusting their beliefs around that. People are people, and stupid people exist everywhere. Time heals all wounds. (IMHO)



posted on Oct, 19 2010 @ 01:48 AM
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There is a bitter irony in all of this...

When South Africa was still under the apartheid government, clubs and societies were forbidden to allow both black and white members. Freemasonry somehow managed to get exempted from this rule, and was the only society in South Africa which was legally allowed, and had, membership of both black and white men during the apartheid era.

As far as I know, South Africa is the only country that has never, in all of it's racist history, excluded black men from Freemasonry.



posted on Oct, 19 2010 @ 08:29 PM
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reply to post by Haydn_17
 


I am currently a member in the Fraternal Organization. I have been a member for over ten years. Our motto is, "To take good men and make them better." We are a public organization who actively implores public heritage, tradition, and fund-raisers daily. Some of which to be named are; The Burn Centers, Saint Jude, Habitat for Humanity and others. I will answer any questions respectfully asked but beware not to ask any of the obvious questions of our secret handshakes, passwords and etc. There is over $1million dollars a day in donations given toward St. Jude. There are qualifications you have to meet in order to become a member. Everyone who applies is only a candidate until becoming a brother if so desired. Hope this helps you for now.

Regards,
Bro. F.&A.M



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