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Our Aryan Heritage: Learn about your real spiritual heritage

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posted on May, 9 2009 @ 03:14 PM
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The Celts believed in three worlds, they were obsessed with the number three, which is very different than four.


So were the Vedic Aryans. They always describe everything in terms of three: the holy trinity: Brahma, Vishnu, Shiva; the three worlds - triloka - physical, astral and causal; the three states of consciousness: waking, dreaming and deep sleep; the three fundamental forces - triguna.


Length of time studying is more a matter of life expectancy and age of maturity, hardly a solid link.


That's not all of it. The Druids and the Brahmins both studied up to 20 years very diverse subhects before they graduated and could practice as priests. Where else was this system being practiced outside of IE culture?


The Celtics believed that sex gave spiritual power, which is completely the opposite of Vedic beliefs.


Hmm, does the word "Kamasuta" mean anything to you?


Memorization when writing was not readily available, paper, pen and all that, is a custom in all cultures, or in other words a cultural universal.


They memorized all the scriptures for the purpose of chanting. Show me where else this was being practice outside of IE culture?


The Celts believed that we rotated through the three worlds, which is different than the reincarnation beliefs of the Vedics.


The Vedics beleive you ascend into the three worlds with your spiritual development. They also said that we rotate through through waking, dreaming and in causal realm.


Religious practices with fire is another cultural universal.


Religious practices where priests gather around a fire, chant sacred verses and offering food and wine into the fire are not universal. Show me a culture outside of the IE group that practice this ritual.


There is no reason to believe that poetry was not a cross culture exchange, where everybody contributed.



This whole Vedic culture is older and better, and the Vedics taught Europeans everything, our culture is better than yours argument that you continue to make is pathetic.


There was no Europe before the Vedic Aryans. Europe was mostly uninhabitable and the few habitation it had was primitive stone age people.
It was civilised by the Vedic Aryan groups which colonised many parts of Europe and civilised the natives there.

Sorry that's just how it is. History is history, whether you like it or not.




posted on May, 9 2009 @ 03:26 PM
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reply to post by Indigo_Child
 


First you said Vedics believe in four worlds, now you say three, glad to see you are getting an education here.


There was no Europe before the Vedic Aryans. Europe was mostly uninhabitable and the few habitation it had was primitive stone age people.


Except that the archeological evidence states otherwise, oldest cities in Turkey, man with copper tools 5,300 years ago.

Seriously, get over yourself dude.



posted on May, 9 2009 @ 03:27 PM
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Your Baudhayana rules are a long ways away from A^2=B^2 + C^2, which allows one to calculate any side of a triangle if one knows the other two sides. What you quote does not even speak of is the far more important development.


Ah, beautiful, so not only do you know nothing about physics, history and culture, you also know nothing about mathematics either:

"A^2 = B^2 + C^2"(It's C^2 = A^2 + B^2) is the algaberic equiavalent of:


1.9. The diagonal of a square produces double the area [of the square].
[...]
1.12. The areas [of the squares] produced separately by the lengths of the breadth of a rectangle together equal the area [of the square] produced by the diagonal.
1.13. This is observed in rectangles having sides 3 and 4, 12 and 5, 15 and 8, 7 and 24, 12 and 35, 15 and 36.[4]


God, your ignorance really is toxic.

You cited the Pythagoras theorem wrong !

[edit on 9-5-2009 by Indigo_Child]



posted on May, 9 2009 @ 03:37 PM
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First you said Vedics believe in four worlds, now you say three, glad to see you are getting an education here.


Nope, I never said Vedics believe in four worlds. The Vedas call the last state Absolute, which is not a world, its the point where all worlds converge.

The Vedic Aryans use the word "triloka" to refer to all three worlds.


Triloka: Hindu - Hinduism Dictionary on Triloka
By Himalayan Academy

triloka: (Sanskrit) "Three worlds." The physical, astral and causal planes (Bhuloka, Antarloka and Sivaloka).

See: world, loka.

For more articles related to Triloka , see: Hinduism, Hinduism Dictionary, Triloka , Body Mind and Soul.


www.experiencefestival.com...

So it turns out just like the Celts use 3 to describe everything, so do the Vedic Aryans. Now what do you say?



posted on May, 9 2009 @ 04:22 PM
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Duck, fatal blow coming:

City planning, irrigation, sanitation, plumbing, roads etc:


The cities of the Indus Valley Civilization were well-organised
Pot sherd from Harappa and solidly built out of brick and stone. Their drainage systems, wells and water storage systems were the most sophisticated in the ancient world. They also developed systems of weights and trade. They made jewellery and game pieces and toys for their children. From looking at the structures and objects which survive we are able to learn about the people who lived and worked in these cities so long ago.


www.ancientindia.co.uk...



Calculus

As you failed my basic challenge of researching it for yourself, once again I am going to have to spell it out for you:


Emergence of Calculus

In the course of developing a precise mapping of the lunar eclipse, Aryabhatta was obliged to introduce the concept of infinitesimals - i.e. tatkalika gati to designate the infinitesimal, or near instantaneous motion of the moon, and express it in the form of a basic differential equation. Aryabhatta's equations were elaborated on by Manjula (10th C) and Bhaskaracharya (12th C) who derived the differential of the sine function. Later mathematicians used their intuitive understanding of integration in deriving the areas of curved surfaces and the volumes enclosed by them.

Applied Mathematics, Solutions to Practical Problems

Developments also took place in applied mathematics such as in creation of trigonometric tables and measurement units. Yativrsabha's work Tiloyapannatti (6th C) gives various units for measuring distances and time and also describes the system of infinite time measures.

In the 9th C, Mahaviracharya ( Mysore) wrote Ganit Saar Sangraha where he described the currently used method of calculating the Least Common Multiple (LCM) of given numbers. He also derived formulae to calculate the area of an ellipse and a quadrilateral inscribed within a circle (something that had also been looked at by Brahmagupta) The solution of indeterminate equations also drew considerable interest in the 9th century, and several mathematicians contributed approximations and solutions to different types of indeterminate equations.

In the late 9th C, Sridhara (probably Bengal) provided mathematical formulae for a variety of practical problems involving ratios, barter, simple interest, mixtures, purchase and sale, rates of travel, wages, and filling of cisterns. Some of these examples involved fairly complicated solutions and his Patiganita is considered an advanced mathematical work. Sections of the book were also devoted to arithmetic and geometric progressions, including progressions with fractional numbers or terms, and formulas for the sum of certain finite series are provided. Mathematical investigation continued into the 10th C. Vijayanandi (of Benares, whose Karanatilaka was translated by Al-Beruni into Arabic) and Sripati of Maharashtra are amongst the prominent mathematicians of the century.

The leading light of 12th C Indian mathematics was Bhaskaracharya who came from a long-line of mathematicians and was head of the astronomical observatory at Ujjain. He left several important mathematical texts including the Lilavati and Bijaganita and the Siddhanta Shiromani, an astronomical text. He was the first to recognize that certain types of quadratic equations could have two solutions. His Chakrawaat method of solving indeterminate solutions preceded European solutions by several centuries, and in his Siddhanta Shiromani he postulated that the earth had a gravitational force, and broached the fields of infinitesimal calculation and integration. In the second part of this treatise, there are several chapters relating to the study of the sphere and it's properties and applications to geography, planetary mean motion, eccentric epicyclical model of the planets, first visibilities of the planets, the seasons, the lunar crescent etc. He also discussed astronomical instruments and spherical trigonometry. Of particular interest are his trigonometric equations: sin(a + b) = sin a cos b + cos a sin b; sin(a - b) = sin a cos b - cos a sin b;

The Kerala School

Although it appears that original work in mathematics ceased in much of Northern India after the Islamic conquests, Benaras survived as a center for mathematical study, and an important school of mathematics blossomed in Kerala. Madhava (14th C, Kochi) made important mathematical discoveries that would not be identified by European mathematicians till at least two centuries later. His series expansion of the cos and sine functions anticipated Newton by almost three centuries. Historians of mathematics, Rajagopal, Rangachari and Joseph considered his contributions instrumental in taking mathematics to the next stage, that of modern classical analysis. Nilkantha (15th C, Tirur, Kerala) extended and elaborated upon the results of Madhava while Jyesthadeva (16th C, Kerala) provided detailed proofs of the theorems and derivations of the rules contained in the works of Madhava and Nilkantha. It is also notable that Jyesthadeva's Yuktibhasa which contained commentaries on Nilkantha's Tantrasamgraha included elaborations on planetary theory later adopted by Tycho Brahe, and mathematics that anticipated work by later Europeans. Chitrabhanu (16th C, Kerala) gave integer solutions to twenty-one types of systems of two algebraic equations, using both algebraic and geometric methods in developing his results. Important discoveries by the Kerala mathematicians included the Newton-Gauss interpolation formula, the formula for the sum of an infinite series, and a series notation for pi.Charles Whish (1835, published in the Transactions of the Royal Asiatic Society of Great Britain and Ireland) was one of the first Westerners to recognize that the Kerala school had anticipated by almost 300 years many European developments in the field.



Indian Mathematics & the development of Calculus




[edit on 9-5-2009 by Indigo_Child]



posted on May, 9 2009 @ 04:32 PM
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reply to post by Indigo_Child
 


Wow, you really don't understand what Pythagorean's theorem is about do you.

These mathematical concepts you submit as being equal to Pythagorean's theorem are no such thing or even close. They talk about calculating the area of a triangle by halving a square, very simplistic based on known quantities, not nearly so complex as Pythagorean's. In addition, area, and length of the third leg for any right angled square are vastly different.

You are in so far over your head it is pathetic. You don't know proof from theory. You are lost.



posted on May, 9 2009 @ 04:37 PM
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reply to post by poet1b
 


Your ignorance knows no bounds. If you translated the rules in the Sulba Sutras into algebra, you get C^2 = A^2 + B^2.

See:

Pythgoras Theorem

Do you even know what algebra is? It is the symbolic representation of language statements.

You've been utterly destroyed. Totally owned as they say in elite speak


Edit: You even quoted the Pythagoras theorem wrong!

[edit on 9-5-2009 by Indigo_Child]



posted on May, 9 2009 @ 05:21 PM
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reply to post by Indigo_Child
 


Errr...unrelated to the current topic (which at the moment seems to be: "Aryans are more awesom!" "No, Celts!" "No, Aryans!"), but it seems to me if you are using variables and algebra, it doesn't matter which letters you use in the equations, as long as the equation itself is correct. Otherwise, I could have even said that you were both wrong, and the correct equation is:

h^2= b^2 + p^2

Hypotenuse squared equals base squared plus perpendicular squared, which is how I learned it
.



posted on May, 9 2009 @ 05:31 PM
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reply to post by babloyi
 



Yeah exactly, there are many ways of saying the same thing. The Sulba Sutras only state the rules and then descriptions of Pythogorean triplets, without stating algaberic proofs. The system of citing mathematical proofs is more of a Greek thing than an Indo-Aryan thing. The Indo-Aryans clearly understand very advanced mathematical concepts though.

There really is no need for there to be any conflict between Celts and Aryans, because they are same culture. Poet1bs rather is arguing for "East vs West" case. He believes that India and China have not made any progress at all, and all scientific, cultural and technological progress is by white people.

I, on the other hand am saying that the great Celts and the great Indo-Aryan people are as great as each other and share a common heritage. Poet1b has a problem with accepting this because he really wants to believe in white superiority.

[edit on 9-5-2009 by Indigo_Child]



posted on May, 9 2009 @ 07:02 PM
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reply to post by Indigo_Child
 


Indigo_Child,

Thank you for all of your work. I am very fascinated. There is so much to digest. What is equally interesting is that I found this thread shortly after putting on paper a few thoughts regarding the teachings of Jesus. I have spent quite a few years focusing solely on the teachings of Jesus, which has up to this point been for me the use of the four canonical gospels only. I am ecstatic to finally see or understand more truth through your sharing of this ancient knowledge. Jesus’ core teaching is identical the Aryan core even though Jesus uses slightly different wordings.

The Keys to the Kingdom

The core of Jesus’ teaching is based upon two commands, loving the Father/Creator with all of our being (heart, soul and mind) and loving our neighbor as our self.

If we identify the Father, the Self and the Neighbor the teaching becomes clearer.

If we recognize the Father as the Creator, the divine universal energy then the command to love with all of our being is easily understood. Is it not this that we seek wholeheartedly in meditation/prayer?

If we understand the Self to be the great and powerful spirit/soul inside of the physical shell rather than the physical body alone then the Self is known.

If we see the Neighbor as all those that we know spouse, child, parent, … and all those that we come in contact with, friend or foe makes no difference then we have briefly identified the three entities of the commands. If I love my neighbors and you love your neighbors, and others love their neighbors, it would be easy to see how this practice could include the whole population.

The next logical step is to define love since we are commanded to love all these entities. Love by Jesus’ terms is both physical and emotional and is defined in several ways; by doing unto others as you would have done to yourself, by acting as the good Samaritan, by becoming as the little child loving and forgiving quickly and easily, by loving your enemy, …

The logic of this teaching is in the understanding the goal. We must practice with the highest goal in mind. The highest goal that one can have for one’s self is the status of Self.

Jesus teaches that we need to be perfected as “ONE”. To be as “ONE” with the Creator means that we are as “ONE” with all things and since all of creation is of the Creator’s/creator’s hand the gods inside us can be one with the Father /Creator and one with each other. Forgiving one’s self is forgiving our brother/neighbor, is forging our self, is forgiving our brother, … to love the Father/Creator is to love our Self is to love our Neighbor, we are ONE, … If we do not forgive our self, we cannot forgive others and vise versa. Forgiving is loving, and loving is forgiving.

We cannot do one command in earnest without the others. Love and forgiveness with humility are the keys to centering our Self for an everlasting position with the Creator. True forgiveness comes out of genuine love and breaks the effect of karma and the continued imprisonment in the body in the cycle of reincarnation.

Loving our neighbor as our SELF is incredibly simple (so simple a child can understand). But simple to understand does not mean easy to do.

Jesus teaches “hatred of life in this world”. Hatred of life in this world equals loving Creator, self and neighbor. Loving self is the opposite of loving a life in this world. He tells us that the flesh profits nothing. The flesh is a very useful tool, like a good pair of boots or gloves. It will help us accomplish our mission’s, whatever they may be, but it will not grow in value as the Self.

A life in this world is a life that typically seeks to better the physical position in the world with no thoughts of Self, Neighbor, or Creator, … betterment of position can happen along with Self awareness, but without it “ a life in this world” usually takes on shadows and secrets, it always comes with a cost.

Once our agenda does not include worldly gain solely for the sake of worldly gain, whatever type of gain that might be (there are many types of gain not just material) then we are learning to love our true self and others.

In doing so, in loving our SELF, we are quitting (just like an addiction) the loving of our lives in this world.

In other words once we are done with the superficial pursuits of this world and focus on Self, the true self, the highest self, the spirit, the soul whatever you want to call your Self, forgiveness becomes easier. Loving one another becomes easier.

Allow our self and others our own experiences/lessons (we chose them), learn to hate our lives in this world, seek the Creator and love our neighbor as our self.

We are ONE.

Peace



posted on May, 9 2009 @ 08:02 PM
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reply to post by student2
 


You might like a book called "The Mystic Christ' which discusses the great similarities of Jesus teachings with Nondual Hinduism and Buddhism. I really enjoyed that book. I'd also recommend you research the Gospel of Thomas.



[edit on 9-5-2009 by Malcram]



posted on May, 9 2009 @ 08:32 PM
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reply to post by student2
 


You're absolutely correct.

Jesus was trying to revive our ancient Aryan culture and hence his links with India. He spent his missing years in tutorship with India's Brahmins, and then survived the crucification and escaped to India to continue his mission under the name Isa. He was married with an Indian woman, had children and was buried in a tomb in Sri Nagar Kashmir.

This is why they were trying to kill him. They then distorted his teachings and used it as their state religion. They then got rid of every India/Aryan connection to Jesus and to Western civilisation they could and their conspiracy has continued since.

What we need now is to work to expose the Abrahamic conspiracy and finish what Jesus was trying to do: revive Aryan culture.

[edit on 9-5-2009 by Indigo_Child]



posted on May, 10 2009 @ 12:06 PM
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reply to post by babloyi
 


It doesn't matter how you label the variables, as long as you know that the square of the hypotenuse is equal to the sum o fthe square of the other two sides. This equation allows you to calculate the length of the hypotenuse, or any of the three sides, as long as you have the length of the other two, which is the huge advantage of having this equation, and what makes it so valuable.

If you know the two adjacent sides to a triangle, then you can calculate the area of the triangle using the Vedic rules provided, but you can't determine the length of the other leg, unless you use standard triangle sizes, like 3,4, and 5. This was known for thousands of years before Pythagorean's. Pythagorean's solved a big problem in geometry which had existed for millenniums.

No, I am not arguing which culture is better, I am stating that it did not all come from Vedic culture as Indigo continues to claim.



posted on May, 10 2009 @ 12:22 PM
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reply to post by poet1b
 


Originally posted by poet1b
It doesn't matter how you label the variables, as long as you know that the square of the hypotenuse is equal to the sum o fthe square of the other two sides. This equation allows you to calculate the length of the hypotenuse, or any of the three sides, as long as you have the length of the other two, which is the huge advantage of having this equation, and what makes it so valuable.

If you read what I said, you'd notice that this is exactly what I was saying.



Originally posted by poet1b
If you know the two adjacent sides to a triangle, then you can calculate the area of the triangle using the Vedic rules provided, but you can't determine the length of the other leg, unless you use standard triangle sizes, like 3,4, and 5. This was known for thousands of years before Pythagorean's. Pythagorean's solved a big problem in geometry which had existed for millenniums.

Actually, while the introduction of the theorem into western thought may have been through Pythagoras, this doesn't mean that Pythagoras was the first to find it out (and I'm not just talking about the well known Pythagorean triples).



posted on May, 10 2009 @ 12:47 PM
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reply to post by Indigo_Child
 


Yeah, there are many ways of saying the same thing, but your Baudhayana rules do not say the same thing as Pythagorean's theorem, and you are an idiot if you think so.

Just because I don't buy your belief that Vedic culture is the only true culture, the most superior culture, the keepers of the ancient knowledge as you claim makes me a racist? No, you are the racist. I am not the one trying to claim that my ancestors were the cat's meow of history, just the opposite.

www.indhistory.com...


Who Were the Aryans?
The Aryans were semi-nomadic Nordic Whites, perhaps located originally on the steppes of southern Russia and Central Asia, who spoke the parent language of the various Indo-European languages.

Traditionally Greek, Latin and Sanskrit were considered the closest languages to PIE, and much of the reconstructed Aryan proto-language is based on them. Modern Lithuanian, however, is the most archaic living language, closer to the original Aryan speech than any other. There is even an IE language, Tocharian, attested in Chinese Turkestan, which indicates that Aryans must have made an appearance in the Far East, a long-standing piece of linguistic evidence which has been recently confirmed by the discovery of the physical remains of a blond-haired people in China.

The birth of a European culture, however, predates the arrival of the Indo-Europeans: The cave art of Lascaux, which some have identified as the first flowering of Western man's creative genius, was the work of Old Europeans, as were Stonehenge in the North and the Minoan Palace culture of Crete in the South. A pan-European religious symbolism had already evolved, much of which was later incorporated into IE mythologies, including various regional adaptations of the ubiquitous Old European reverence for the Mother Goddess. Many of the principal figures in Greek mythology predate the arrival of Aryans, and during the course of ancient history Old European religious beliefs and practices continually reasserted themselves. [Image: Minoan snake goddess, from the Palace of Minos, circa 1600 BC]


By the way, if Jesus learned from another culture, it was very unlikely that it was the Vedic culture, but far more likely to have been the Zoroastrians, who were also once Aryans. The Zoroastrians were the people who conceived of the battle between good and evil, and the idea of the son of God driving evil from the world. The Zoroastrians were the Persians, another society created by the Aryans. They follows the Gathas, and their culture was every bit as rich and insightful as the Vedic culture.

So, where is your Vedic formulas for calculating speed, velocity, and acceleration (calculus)? Let's have a look at their derivatives. I look forward to blowing your next duck out of the water.


[edit on 10-5-2009 by poet1b]

[edit on 10-5-2009 by poet1b]



posted on May, 10 2009 @ 12:57 PM
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reply to post by babloyi
 



Actually, while the introduction of the theorem into western thought may have been through Pythagoras, this doesn't mean that Pythagoras was the first to find it out (and I'm not just talking about the well known Pythagorean triples).


So what are you saying, you have evidence that states otherwise?

Are you also saying the white Nordic Aryans deserve credit for all the great accomplishments of history in agreement with Indigo? We don't dare give the Greeks any credit for anything, they stole it all from the Aryans?



posted on May, 10 2009 @ 12:58 PM
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reply to post by poet1b
 



This is observed in rectangles having sides 3 and 4, 12 and 5, 15 and 8, 7 and 24, 12 and 35, 15 and 36.[4]


It gives a description of several Pygorean triplets in illustration of the rules. It is clear they know of a theorem to calculate the sides of a right angled triangle and know how to apply it. The Sulba Sutras actually contain methods and descriptions on various geometry.

The only difference between Pythagoras and and Baudhyana is Baudhyana states it non-axiomatically and Pythgoras states it axiomatically. Moreover there is evidence that Pythagoras learned it from the Vedic people in the first place.

By the way do you agree now that the Indians really did develop Calculus before Newton? The Indians and Chinese really did progress significantly? The Indians really did develop high civilisation before anybody else(plumbing, sanitation, roads, planned cities etc) If you don't, I am going to termnate our discussion here, because you clearly are not amenable to facts.

[edit on 10-5-2009 by Indigo_Child]



posted on May, 10 2009 @ 01:07 PM
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reply to post by Indigo_Child
 


No, just the opposite, it shows that they only know how to use certain proportionately sized triangles to arrive at the third side, which was known for thousands of years before Pythagorean's theorem. What this means is that they couldn't determine the third side of any sized triangle that didn't fit specific proportioned dimensions.

If you can't recognize the difference, then you don't know squat about mathematics or engineering.



posted on May, 10 2009 @ 01:11 PM
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reply to post by Indigo_Child
 


You keeps saying that the Vedics did it all before anyone else, but where is your evidence. The oldest found cities are in Turkey, not India. I just provided you with a link on Aryan history, by an Indian web site, which states that there were cultures in Europe that predated the Aryans, so how could the Vedic Aryans have created civilization first?



posted on May, 10 2009 @ 01:14 PM
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reply to post by poet1b
 


I am sorry it is insulting to my intelligence to continue any discussion with you. You called Einstein wrong, you called the top researcher into Celtic culture Peter Ellis "too liberal" and dismissed all his research, and then dismissed all other Celtic researchers which said Vedic and Celtic culture are the same, you said India and China did not progress and it was the whites that made all the progress, even after I showed you all their inventions and discoveries, and now are telling me that the Indians did not understood Pythagoras theorem and they did not develop Calclus, despite me putting the facts in front of you. You are easily the most ignorant person I have talked to on ATS. You're also clearly a closet-racist.

You will find like-minded company at Stormfront.

Namaste.

[edit on 10-5-2009 by Indigo_Child]




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