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NASA about to announce something Big?

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posted on May, 12 2008 @ 05:39 AM
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ALthough this sounds xciting like some have said...is it realy worth looking forward to? i mean they have lied about ET life and ET space craft...so if this is Planet X aka Nibiru what r they guna say..."attention ladys,gentlmen and the media, we have long awaited to find a plantet known as ... its heading for earth run for your lives.... il be keen to find out...nothing apart from ET life could be interesting....we shall wait and see...




posted on May, 12 2008 @ 05:48 AM
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reply to post by SilentShadow
 


ALthough this sounds xciting like some have said...is it realy worth looking forward to? i mean they have lied about ET life and ET space craft...so if this is Planet X aka Nibiru what r they guna say..."attention ladys,gentlmen and the media, we have long awaited to find a plantet known as ... its heading for earth run for your lives.... il be keen to find out...nothing apart from ET life could be interesting....we shall wait and see...



posted on May, 12 2008 @ 05:49 AM
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Originally posted by Landru
A. These Anti-American vs. Europe side fights are destructive and childish. I imagine we all have similar interests and hopes being on this board. Somehow we prick each other and turn into little "W"'s, or the European elites -- its nuts - that isn't getting anyone anywhere

B. Anyone who thinks Europe "has more satellites than America" is my friends seriously misinformed.

"Europe" is not not really even a member of the club:

In January there were 872 satellites in orbit and 443 or 50.8% were from the U.S. - No other country has more than 90.
Russia has 85 (9%), China has 40 (4%), Japan 35 (3%), China 11 leaving about 44% of all satellites to be shared by Canada (the biggest remainder with 11, Israel, India etc.) If we count every European country as "Europe" we might reach a number that is over 1/2 the satellites that the U.S. has - but not much more than that ... the statement that "most are from Europe" is such an obvious and patent falsehood that it smells of (red) herring.


[edit on 11-5-2008 by Landru]


So you have done exactly what you said you didn't want people to do on this forum, congrats. I guess the judgment swings different for yourself.



posted on May, 12 2008 @ 06:01 AM
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Originally posted by Landru
B. Anyone who thinks Europe "has more satellites than America" is my friends seriously misinformed.
"Europe" is not not really even a member of the club:

In January there were 872 satellites in orbit and 443 or 50.8% were from the U.S. - No other country has more than 90.
Russia has 85 (9%), China has 40 (4%), Japan 35 (3%), China 11 leaving about 44% of all satellites to be shared by Canada (the biggest remainder with 11, Israel, India etc.) If we count every European country as "Europe" we might reach a number that is over 1/2 the satellites that the U.S. has - but not much more than that ... the statement that "most are from Europe" is such an obvious and patent falsehood that it smells of (red) herring.
[edit on 11-5-2008 by Landru]


He didnt say Europe HAD more satellites than the US, he said they LAUNCHED more. I dont know the figures myself but just thought it was worth correcting your above post as you seemed to be knocking the OP using incorrect assumptions and figures.



posted on May, 12 2008 @ 06:46 AM
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I have a feeling the announcement is going to be this, although it doesn't seem to mention Chandra right enough. Just a hunch.

www.space.com...



posted on May, 12 2008 @ 10:00 AM
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Just a thought... mainly because I can't comprehend how space time works in our universe.
But after this was posted I started thinking about LHC and all those assumptions that were being made about it being dangerous or not dangerous.

If I remember correctly one of the theories about time travel is that you can never go further back than the point in time where the "machine" was invented. Likewise the earliest posible time we could see something travel back in time to us is the time we invented the "machine".

Now about the LHC... if I was the inventer and operator of such a monster I wouldn't wait till "opening day" with turning it on. I would want to look good when all the reporters are there covering the story.
So, I'd have to have turned the machine on atleast once before the big day. In other words... I assume the LHC has already been turned on and tested. The question in my mind is how long ago they turned it on the first time... AND... how long ago did Chandra spot that object?

In chronological form:

- LHC being build
- LHC is finished and turned on for dress rehersal x number of times
- Chandra spots object
- Nasa announces that something has been found
- LHC is turned on "for the first time"

Is this plausible or gullible?


Anyways... helps me wrap up some of these thoughts.


[edit on 12/5/08 by flice]



posted on May, 12 2008 @ 10:07 AM
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reply to post by CzErased
 



I think you hit it right on the nose.

I think it is supporting evidence for a theory in dark matter or the creationist theroy! Excellent find OP!




posted on May, 12 2008 @ 12:26 PM
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Its probably just another earth-like planet. I don't think that there about to give us any news that would put people in panic. When has NASA been truthful about anything.



posted on May, 12 2008 @ 01:05 PM
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I don't feel like reading every post in this huge thread since I just found it, but I wanted to shoot some food for thought.

They made an announcement of the media event, which means they think it is a big deal.

The word used is "object". So it's not something like Dark Matter or alien life for example (unless the object is an unidentified one, wink wink).

It could not be an Earth-destroying object, because if it was they would have said "to announce the discovery of an object in our Galaxy astronomers have been watching out for for more than 50 years", certainly not "hunting for".

They say they have been searching for this "object" for 50 years, NASA was only established just a few months shy of 50 years ago.

So what has NASA been searching for since it's inception? Does anyone know what their main mission was to search for since it started up?


NASA's mission is to:
· To understand and protect our home planet
· To explore the Universe and search for life
· To inspire the next generation of explorers
…as only NASA can

www.ksc.nasa.gov...

Could be a black hole, planet in our Solar System , or a new Earth-like planet. But it would be much more interesting if they found a fossil or object of alien origin.

I guess we'll see.





[edit on 12-5-2008 by Grey Basket]



posted on May, 12 2008 @ 01:53 PM
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I feel what NASA has discovered will be something of importance and interest to the scientific community, but not necessarily to the average man on the street. I, too, am interested in what they have discovered but I will make no guesses. I will wait for the release, study the information provided, and come to my own conclusions. Everyone should respect the views of others and their God given right to express themselves, while not necessarily sharing the same view points.

God Bless,

Cliff



posted on May, 12 2008 @ 01:58 PM
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Originally posted by Grey Basket
I don't feel like reading every post in this huge thread since I just found it, but I wanted to shoot some food for thought.

They made an announcement of the media event, which means they think it is a big deal.

The word used is "object". So it's not something like Dark Matter or alien life for example (unless the object is an unidentified one, wink wink).

It could not be an Earth-destroying object, because if it was they would have said "to announce the discovery of an object in our Galaxy astronomers have been watching out for for more than 50 years", certainly not "hunting for".

They say they have been searching for this "object" for 50 years, NASA was only established just a few months shy of 50 years ago.

So what has NASA been searching for since it's inception? Does anyone know what their main mission was to search for since it started up?


NASA's mission is to:
· To understand and protect our home planet
· To explore the Universe and search for life
· To inspire the next generation of explorers
…as only NASA can

www.ksc.nasa.gov...

Could be a black hole, planet in our Solar System , or a new Earth-like planet. But it would be much more interesting if they found a fossil or object of alien origin.

I guess we'll see.





[edit on 12-5-2008 by Grey Basket]



Excellent points Grey.

I just got out of a meeting and we were going over the information about covering the teleconference live while Jack Harris of our radio program is going to be in on, and these are exactly what we were talking about in the meeting. Trying to formulate pre-questions to come armed to the teleconference with isn't an easy task but we are leaning more to the discovery of a planet that contains all the ingredients for life like earth. Even on some level. But again, who knows. But some calls to some of the physics we have had on our program has given us some good idea that bring us to this conclusion. But noting solid.

Cant wait until Wed!



posted on May, 12 2008 @ 02:37 PM
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I have a feeling its about finding plumes of water on Enceladus

Nasas big announcement?



posted on May, 12 2008 @ 03:09 PM
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They say it is something big and it probably is.... to them. To the majority of the rest of us it probably won't mean much. IMO it is going to be something to do with dark matter or black holes. I suppose we will find out in 2 days eh?

Peace



posted on May, 12 2008 @ 03:23 PM
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I'm just still shocked that we haven't been back to the moon in so long. Somethings up at NASA, and whatever they are announcing is just for attention. It's not about spreading information to them, it's about benefiting the government.

In fact, I wouldn't be surprised if the reason why we haven't been back is because all this time they have been working on defense contracts with the department of defense.



posted on May, 12 2008 @ 03:55 PM
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www.dw-world.de...
Science | 25.04.2007


The first habitable planet similar in size and conditions to the Earth has been located in a distant solar system, once again raising the possibility of life on other planets, scientists revealed Wednesday.

The as-yet unnamed planet is only about one-and-a-half times the size of Earth and five times more massive, a team of European astronomers announced at the European Southern Observatory in Garching, Germany.

"We have estimated that the mean temperature of this super-Earth lies between 0 and 40 degrees Celsius (32 and 104 degrees Fahrenheit), and water would thus be liquid," said Stephane Udry of the Geneva Observatory. "Models predict that the planet should be either rocky like our Earth or covered with oceans."

The planet is located around a star known as the Gliese 581, about 20.5 light years from the Earth's solar system and one of the 100 closest stars to the Sun.


--------------------------------------------------------------------

Maybe it has something to do with this...


[edit on 12-5-2008 by pyroboy4206]



posted on May, 12 2008 @ 03:58 PM
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Originally posted by ezziboo
Sometimes the partner star is the same type, sometimes a totally different type of star, such as a red or brown dwarf.

Brown dwarf stars are almost impossible to detect visually because, well, they're brown and give off almost no visible light...however, the Chandra X-Ray Telescope is capable of detecting radiation emitted by brown dwarves in the form of, you guessed it, x-rays.

Perhaps a very nearby brown dwarf's x-ray emissions have been detected by Chandra...




50+ years ago there was a theory of a 'Nemesis' Star that was theorized to be about 1-2 LightYear distant.
Perhaps that was one of the NASA missions, to identify that binary twin star that some scientists thought was out there causing disturbances in the Oort cloud.

but i still favor the fantasmagorical, which would be a 'Sign of David' which would be a 6 star configuration out there, but seen only in the infrared band...wouldn't that be both novel and eerie



posted on May, 12 2008 @ 04:45 PM
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reply to post by Grey Basket
 


Actually upon further thinking, it says "an object in our Galaxy astronomers have been hunting for more than 50 years".

NASA has not even been around for 50 years yet, hence they said "astronomers" have been looking for this for more than 50 years.

It's amazing how much can be extrapolated from such little information.



posted on May, 12 2008 @ 04:48 PM
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According to this press release:
chandra.harvard.edu...

50 years ago Sagittarius-A (the black hole at the center of our galaxy) sent out a powerful burst of X-rays. this was about a decade before we even had satellites that could detect X-rays. The burst was massive. This could be some new discovery related to that. There are a lot of different possibilities. All we really have is the 50 year clue.

-ChriS



posted on May, 12 2008 @ 04:52 PM
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reply to post by kindred
 


I went with that as my 1st opinion, however can missing matter be considered " an object"?

I am hoping that it is not missing matter, or a halo of hot gas that helps support missing matter, does not turn out to be 'an object' as NASA words it.



posted on May, 12 2008 @ 04:58 PM
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Originally posted by badBERTHA
I'm guessing they have found... a DVD of 50 years of NASA available to buy at your local stores or online. Or perhaps a limited edition commemorative Book, signed by Neil Armstrong et al - what better way to celebrate 50 glorious years (NASA was established on July 29, 1958)

Where's me chequebook?



Berth


So if NASA was established in 1958, and they found something they have been looking for for over 50 years, its something they have been looking for since 1958 when they were established.

Then my wild guess is, they have found something that has to do with why NASA was established in the first place, and what are NASA's goals?


NASA's mission is to:
· To understand and protect our home planet
· To explore the Universe and search for life
· To inspire the next generation of explorers
…as only NASA can


Now i guess they wouldnt call a black hole, dark matter or a meteorite an object they, and astronomers too, have searched and hunted for.

[edit on 12/5/08 by TheNetherlands]



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