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If a Rogue Star was Heading Our Way what would We Do ?

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posted on Jan, 19 2020 @ 03:09 PM
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originally posted by: HalWesten
a reply to: gortex

I like network dude's answer, get a comfy chair, some bourbon and sit in the yard waiting for it.


wonder how hard it would be to keep your composure if you could see the wall of fire approaching though...




posted on Jan, 19 2020 @ 03:28 PM
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a reply to: andy06shake

I agree with that. We need to put our eggs in a lot of baskets. Er...

Ultimately, we need to park our homeworld in the habitable zone of a nice orange dwarf. 50+ billion year lifespans FTW!



posted on Jan, 19 2020 @ 04:05 PM
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originally posted by: yuppa

originally posted by: HalWesten
a reply to: gortex

I like network dude's answer, get a comfy chair, some bourbon and sit in the yard waiting for it.


wonder how hard it would be to keep your composure if you could see the wall of fire approaching though...


It's not like it's going a million miles an hour, you'd see it for days or weeks or even months and then it would depend on what time of day it hit, you might not see it at all.

It's one of those things that we don't have to worry about, there are no planets coming our way and if there are, we will be gone for millennia before they get here.



posted on Jan, 19 2020 @ 06:07 PM
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originally posted by: LanceCorvette
Of all the unlikely events that may cause my death, a star hitting the Earth at random is the unlikeliest of them all.

The point is , a star would not have to "hit" .
Just get close to the Solar System .
And....
"Turn out the lights , the party's over"



posted on Jan, 19 2020 @ 06:09 PM
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a reply to: Gothmog

Indeed. A star passing nearby would do a good job of moving Earth all by itself.

Out to the black we go!
edit on 1/19/2020 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 19 2020 @ 07:17 PM
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a reply to: 0zzymand0s

Earth eh, what a predicament?

End of the day ile be happy if humanity manages to make it through the next 1000 years without blowing ourselves to smithereens nevermind rogue stars headed in our direction to contend with.

Fact is none of us are getting out alive.
LoL



posted on Jan, 19 2020 @ 07:48 PM
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I think it would be easier to build large Starship fleets if built simultaneously on each continent.
A defensive fleet to protect all ships would be required aswell.

These ships would be tested flown and parked incase a planetary threat was to occur. At that point the crafts become Exodus crafts.

a reply to: gortex

Trying to move the solar system seems to involve maths associated with the SOL System and the Galaxy. Some wrong math could attract the SOL System to another star or
Not saying it's impossible just that all math needs evaluated...



posted on Jan, 19 2020 @ 07:57 PM
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a reply to: Ophiuchus 13

If/when we ever manage to build vehicles that can cross the distances between the stars or even cruise around our own star system we are apt to use them for a hell of a lot more than just for exodus purposes given the fact that humanity does not create tools it does not use.

Its not the math that holds us back, but the material science and monies required.



posted on Jan, 19 2020 @ 07:58 PM
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a reply to: gortex

Maybe GLOBAL WARMING is the first sign that a star is approaching our solar system.



posted on Jan, 19 2020 @ 08:03 PM
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I would have a star party....




posted on Jan, 19 2020 @ 08:16 PM
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a reply to: carewemust

That just the cycle of our own star and the fact that our Earth moves in epochs, climate change is simply an inevitability.



posted on Jan, 19 2020 @ 08:22 PM
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a reply to: andy06shake

I used the words "global WARMING". An approaching star could begin warming us up, while it is still a long ways away.



posted on Jan, 19 2020 @ 08:29 PM
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a reply to: carewemust

Yes, that how it would work not to mention create a few gravitational anomalies in and around our star system.

Dwarf star Gliese 710, which we have known about for some time, could arrive on a trajectory that would bring it close to the Solar System in around 1.29 million years.

And we have known about that since 1996.

Whilst it's not quite fast enough to be considered a runaway star, at a speed of 51,499 kilometres per hour, it's still travelling at a hefty speed and in our general direction.



posted on Jan, 19 2020 @ 08:53 PM
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a reply to: 0zzymand0s

If it was 4 million light years away, and traveling relative to us at anything less than the speed of light, it would take well over 4 million years to get here.

I would say it's unlikely even that the prediction of its collision would be accurate at that time scale and distance.



posted on Jan, 19 2020 @ 08:58 PM
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a reply to: LanceCorvette

Considering the diameter of the observable universe is around 93.016 billion light-years, with a radius of 46.508 billion light-years, i really don't see us detecting anything 4 million light-years distant nevermind being able to calculate the trajectory in any kind of conclusive manner with our current technology.

At least that's my understanding of the matter as there are too many unknown variables to consider.
edit on 19-1-2020 by andy06shake because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 19 2020 @ 09:16 PM
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genuinely thought this was going to be a thread about the recent re-escalation in Nibiru hysteria and i gotta admit i'm a liiiiittle disappointed... was getting the popcorn ready and all


science is cool tho i guess



posted on Jan, 19 2020 @ 09:18 PM
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a reply to: gortex

Well its an interesting theory. But I would just build a new star and planets. Less work and wasted energy that way.



posted on Jan, 19 2020 @ 09:24 PM
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a reply to: continuousThunder

Oh Nibiru came and went, and is still around, its gears have not even yet begun to turn, but for the few it has deemed worthy.

But you missed the boat on that whole Nibiru scare thats so 1997.



posted on Jan, 19 2020 @ 10:24 PM
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originally posted by: andy06shake
a reply to: LanceCorvette

Considering the diameter of the observable universe is around 93.016 billion light-years, with a radius of 46.508 billion light-years, i really don't see us detecting anything 4 million light-years distant nevermind being able to calculate the trajectory in any kind of conclusive manner with our current technology.

At least that's my understanding of the matter as there are too many unknown variables to consider.


Turns out since the universe is Infinite just what we see is not the entire universe. Space itself is moving faster than light and is not constrained by the light speed limit. And turns out since the universe is infinite it has ALWAYS been infinite,meaning the big bang happenned EVERYWHERE at once not just in our observable sphere. There are many many versions of our observable universe in other universes.



posted on Jan, 19 2020 @ 10:29 PM
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a reply to: yuppa

Yes, im aware of how expansion functions.

As to there being many versions of our observable universe in other universes.

That's not something we are currently able to measure nor observe and which might always be the case.

The universe may indeed for all intents and purpose be infinite but the observable universe is all we can see, well from here on Earth any road.


edit on 19-1-2020 by andy06shake because: (no reason given)



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