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Dangerous Seismic Activity is Happening on the West Coast

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posted on Dec, 25 2019 @ 11:05 PM
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a reply to: elysiumfire

Good question. I've noticed when there's periods, 12 hours to a day or so of no tremors or temblors, a temblor happens. At least this yeah in Cascadia.

Here's info about tremors posted in 2017: Slow Slip Earthquake season raises risks of The Big One -
www.abovetopsecret.com...




posted on Dec, 26 2019 @ 01:42 AM
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a reply to: TrueAmerican

I love the YouTube live feed. It's fun to check if the reds and yellows register on the USGS eq list.

What's with the frequent spikes of light blue on the Rainier feeds? They often show up simultaneously or close to simultaneously in multiple Rainier feeds. Just noise?



posted on Dec, 26 2019 @ 02:13 AM
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a reply to: Look2theSacredHeart

Mostly just glacial movements and avalanches/rockfalls, but lately there have been a few small quakes there too.



posted on Dec, 26 2019 @ 08:46 AM
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a reply to: jadedANDcynicalYes. Subduction earthquakes are the most destructive and live out at the coasts of someplaces. San Andreas will never be like the movie of the same name. It is plates like the one off of Japan, Indonesia, and yes, Washington state that are the real big ones. The quake will kill few relative to the following tsunami and inability to mobilize relief efforts productively enough to save some people. The San Andreas fault "rubs" and subduction zones "pop." I really don't see Cali ever getting a 9 magnitude. Oregon and Washington will get at least that.



posted on Dec, 26 2019 @ 12:55 PM
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originally posted by: Gyo01
a reply to: jadedANDcynicalYes. Subduction earthquakes are the most destructive and live out at the coasts of someplaces. San Andreas will never be like the movie of the same name. It is plates like the one off of Japan, Indonesia, and yes, Washington state that are the real big ones. The quake will kill few relative to the following tsunami and inability to mobilize relief efforts productively enough to save some people. The San Andreas fault "rubs" and subduction zones "pop." I really don't see Cali ever getting a 9 magnitude. Oregon and Washington will get at least that.


It is the Juan de fuca that is the mother of the fault slips for all the trouble I do believe.

www.usgs.gov...


edit on 26-12-2019 by Justoneman because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 26 2019 @ 04:30 PM
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a reply to: JustonemanYa, it is called Juan de Fuca. No puns intended on our parts, but dang.



posted on Dec, 26 2019 @ 05:45 PM
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This definitely requires attention. I've been really concerned with the activity at Yellowstone. So when ever any geological events happen on the west coast that draws allot of interest. I always keep an eye on all related reports coming in across different threads.



posted on Dec, 26 2019 @ 06:27 PM
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a reply to: Gyo01

Check out the Garlock, not Japan or Cascadia level but could pop off a bigger one than we thought before



posted on Dec, 27 2019 @ 07:58 AM
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pretty quiet last 24 hours

good

Turkey got a 4.9 and Siberia had some action.



posted on Dec, 27 2019 @ 09:07 AM
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a reply to: Lilroanie I will check it out. I just started reading about stuff like this this year because I wanted to learn more after watching those sad tsunami documentaries. I never even knew about Cascadia/Juan de Fuca. I know the people up there know but I feel it should be more general knowledge when something is that serious. There are some good teachers out there who don't just follow the curriculum only and put out some other things verbally, but they can't tell ya everything. Not even close. I would say I hope they build seawalls but that didn't help Japan seemingly whatsoever. It surprised them but I am surprised also they thought it would work well after learning the force displaced water carries. It was definitely worth a shot and not stupid at all to try though.



posted on Dec, 27 2019 @ 09:40 AM
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originally posted by: carewemust

originally posted by: Jefferton
I predict many stars and flags, followed by many supportive comments, shortly thereafter followed by dwindling interest, and eventually silence.
Some time passes, and a new thread of similar topic, and thinly veiled warning appears.
And the cycle begins again.


ATS is not set up to keep a thread active long, unless the same people keep contributing to it.

Very few people use ATS by clicking "Recent" on the navigation ribbon. That's the only way I surf the site. So if someone adds a post to a 2012 thread, I'll see it, but most ATS members/visitors will not.


Really? I thought that was the only way to keep up with threads, by clicking the "Recent" tab. I guess you can add one more to the very few. And I've been here since Oct 2012.



posted on Dec, 27 2019 @ 12:29 PM
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a reply to: Gyo01

There used to be a guy here from the PNSN posting here. He had a lot of really cool input for a few years.

I "think" it's JohnVidale in This thread. I can't remember when he first posted but someone made a thread he got informed of and decided to join to educate folks.
ETA: yeah that's him, his tag line "Director of Pacific Northwest Seismic Network"
edit on 12/27/2019 by Lilroanie because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 27 2019 @ 07:56 PM
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UPDATE:
The fault is still occasionally chirping with small aftershocks, and none of them are getting reported by USGS because of the 4.5 mag reporting threshold for foreign countries. Until it settles down for a week or so, with no more aftershocks, there is still the risk of a bigger quake- and still the risk of triggering. That risk is small at this point, and overall, it seems to be quieting down.

But I remind you that's what it did after each of these quakes. So we cannot be sure until some time has passed, and the fault goes quiet. In the meantime we are still watching it closely.



posted on Dec, 27 2019 @ 08:10 PM
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originally posted by: LSU2018

originally posted by: carewemust

originally posted by: Jefferton
I predict many stars and flags, followed by many supportive comments, shortly thereafter followed by dwindling interest, and eventually silence.
Some time passes, and a new thread of similar topic, and thinly veiled warning appears.
And the cycle begins again.


ATS is not set up to keep a thread active long, unless the same people keep contributing to it.

Very few people use ATS by clicking "Recent" on the navigation ribbon. That's the only way I surf the site. So if someone adds a post to a 2012 thread, I'll see it, but most ATS members/visitors will not.


Really? I thought that was the only way to keep up with threads, by clicking the "Recent" tab. I guess you can add one more to the very few. And I've been here since Oct 2012.


It's all I do..click "recent"



posted on Dec, 28 2019 @ 05:19 AM
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Now quakes are occurring on the Gorda Plate. Normally I wouldn't care, but these seem too close in time to what just happened with all the 6's on the north side. One 3.7, a 4.3, and a 3.9, all within a couple hours.
edit on Sat Dec 28th 2019 by TrueAmerican because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 28 2019 @ 01:43 PM
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a reply to: BlueJacket


For what its worth, my wife heard from family and friends up in Washington that they saw " Earthquake lights" last night.


It’s my firm belief that this effect is caused by large quartz crystal deposits being stressed by slow ground movement. When a large chunk of quartz is contorted by earth movement it will eventually pop back to a resting position or just crack. When that happens the quartz releases a massive amount of electricity, about the same voltage as a bolt of lightning. The science here is called Piezoelectricity.

This same phenomenon can be observed on a lower scale with a gas grill ignition device called a piezo igniter. Here is a Piezo ignition description that explains it quite well.



en.wikipedia.org...


Piezo ignition is a type of ignition that is used in portable camping stoves, gas grills and some lighters, and potato cannons.[1] Piezo ignition uses the principle of piezoelectricity, which, in short, is the electric charge that accumulates in some materials in response to high pressure. It consists of a small, spring-loaded hammer which, when a button is pressed, hits a crystal of PZT or quartz crystal. Quartz is piezoelectric, which means that it creates a voltage when deformed. This sudden forceful deformation produces a high voltage and subsequent electrical discharge, which ignites the gas.
No external electric connection is required, though wires are sometimes used to locate the sparking location away from the crystal itself. Piezo ignition systems can be operated by either a lever, push-button or built into the control knob. An electric spark is usually generated once per turn of the knob or press of the button.


Here is a lab experiment of a disassembled BBQ lighter using an oscilloscope to measure the voltage output of the tiny quartz crystal in that unit. The guy gently taps the crystal in his demonstration which produces 240V spikes. He doesn’t hit the quartz with the full potential force because that would damage his O-scope. The normal use of the device produces a few thousand volt spikes which causes the spark and lights the fuel.

rimstar.org...

Quartz molecular structure is SiO2. That's one part Silicon and 2 parts Oxygen. Silicon is a semiconductor and when it's properly motivated it will give up one of its free electrons. It's this stress effect on the crystal that causes the charge to build up in the lattice and then violently release when the rock goes back to its resting position.

Also, Quartz is the second most abundant mineral in Earth's continental crust, behind feldspar.



posted on Dec, 28 2019 @ 11:31 PM
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a reply to: lostinspace

Very interesting. Gold and quartz are bedfellows, and there is an abundance of both in the PNW...



posted on Dec, 28 2019 @ 11:46 PM
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originally posted by: BlueJacket
a reply to: lostinspace

Very interesting. Gold and quartz are bedfellows, and there is an abundance of both in the PNW...


Hope they took note exactly where the earthquake lightning took place. They need to buy that land because quartz and possibly good amounts of gold are present in that location.



posted on Dec, 29 2019 @ 11:30 AM
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a reply to: lostinspace

Hmmm, lol dont tell my wife or we will be camping in no time!



posted on Dec, 29 2019 @ 07:32 PM
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originally posted by: lostinspace

originally posted by: BlueJacket
a reply to: lostinspace

Very interesting. Gold and quartz are bedfellows, and there is an abundance of both in the PNW...


Hope they took note exactly where the earthquake lightning took place. They need to buy that land because quartz and possibly good amounts of gold are present in that location.
Actually, if it occured on BLM land which is highly likely...no need to buy the land, you can stake a 20 acre claim, if you can find color, for about $170 bucks a year.




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