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All Those Tiny White Dots in Mind-Blowing New Hubble Photo Are Actually Galaxies

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posted on May, 9 2019 @ 12:34 PM
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originally posted by: Justoneman
a reply to: Blue Shift

Most of us, who haven't claimed to see aliens, are at least open to the idea because it would be just horrible to be the only sentient scientifically oriented beings in such a vast expanse of natural beauty.

I'm open to the idea. I think humanity discovering aliens would be the coolest and most horrifying thing to ever happen. But I'm not going to just believe they're out there just because I feel lonely for the species and there are so many suns and planets out there that they JUST HAVE TO EXIST. Not with no solid, direct and verifiable proof. That's just silly.

And we're not "alone." There are 8 billion people on the planet, and lots of other interesting creatures and things to see. Want to share some of the universes' natural beauty with someone? What's the matter? Human people aren't good enough for you?




posted on May, 9 2019 @ 01:11 PM
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a reply to: Blue Shift

My take on it is that I personally feel that given the size and scope of the universe, and given what we know about life to be able to persist in almost any condition on Earth, there almost surely be life elsewhere in the universe, and a portion of that life may be intelligent.

I say "almost surely" rather than "definitely" because I understand that technically we have yet to find positive proof of life elsewhere, so there still exists a scientifically-speaking non-zero chance that we are alone.

Granted , that non-zero chance might be so small that it is approaching zero, but non-zero is still non-zero. So while I personally feel it is a virtual certainty that life exists elsewhere, my personal feelings -- no matter how much I want to believe -- cannot make that non-zero chance that we are alone become a zero chance that we are not alone.

We would need positive proof of independent life elsewhere in order for that non-zero chance to go away.


edit on 5/9/2019 by Soylent Green Is People because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 9 2019 @ 02:05 PM
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originally posted by: Soylent Green Is People
a reply to: Blue Shift
I say "almost surely" rather than "definitely" because I understand that technically we have yet to find positive proof of life elsewhere, so there still exists a scientifically-speaking non-zero chance that we are alone.

Because we exist, we know that it's possible for creatures like us to exist in the universe, given the right environment. But because we really have no idea how life came to exist on Earth, we can't statistically extrapolate that out into the universe at large. We could be an outlier or fluke. Like with the Drake Equation, the lowest possible value it could be is still zero.

But just like with Bigfoot, I'm all for people taking the time and even spending the money to look for aliens. We have plenty of time and money to waste -- we'll never spend as much looking for aliens as we spend on cat food -- and if it pays off, the expense will be irrelevant. Like I said, it would be an entertaining horror.



posted on May, 9 2019 @ 08:19 PM
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a reply to: gortex


I love this photo. It really makes me feel small and insignificant compared to all that’s really out there. I don’t understand how people can look at this and still think we are alone in the universe. It’s amazing.



posted on Jun, 30 2019 @ 02:14 PM
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There could be humans just like us out there some where doing the exact same as us looking at pictures of the enormity of the universe and wondering if they are alone.



posted on Jun, 30 2019 @ 03:12 PM
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I wonder at what point you're looking so far back in time that the universe is so unexpanded that it doesn't matter where in the sky you point your telescopes you end up seeing the same thing.



posted on Jul, 11 2019 @ 09:24 PM
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as far as I am aware there are no real ways to see millions of light years away in real time. the closest galaxy to us is around 2.5 million light years away. if a being in that galaxy happened to have a telescope capable of seeing our trees move, today, they would be seeing an ice age, and what you could loosely describe as an intelligent life form capable of making tools (if you follow this theory). who knows if they have the means for deep space travel. if it is expensive for them to do so, they may wait till they see us do something intelligent (make fire) before they decide to pop on over... so we should expect them in about 1 million years



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