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Scientists discover mysterious new communication mechanism in the brain

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posted on Feb, 18 2019 @ 04:50 PM
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Researchers studying the brain have stumbled upon a mysterious, previously unknown form of neural communication that has stunned the scientific community.

a self-propagating ‘wireless’ communication they encountered that can jump across different sections of the brain
Source

When we sleep, our brain periodically creates mysterious "neural waves" to generate electrical fields that, as scientists found, can allow parts of the brain to communicate with one another - even when not physically connected. Think of it like the brain's own "wifi". Parts of the brain can apparently communicate with one another without being physically connected.

The team managed to simulate communication across completely severed brain tissue

I have a feeling this discovery will be far more important than people realize.
edit on 2/18/2019 by trollz because: (no reason given)



+12 more 
posted on Feb, 18 2019 @ 05:04 PM
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Science yet again attempts to catch up to reality. This could proves several things including dreams theories and psychic abilities.


+2 more 
posted on Feb, 18 2019 @ 05:20 PM
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a reply to: trollz

telepathy


+19 more 
posted on Feb, 18 2019 @ 05:25 PM
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a reply to: trollz

My daughter and I slept head to head during an afternoon nap and we both dreamed the same thing, chasing rabbits together in teletubbie land so I believe this is posible


+7 more 
posted on Feb, 18 2019 @ 05:31 PM
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Yet another reason to wear a Tin Foil Hat!

CT's had it right all along!



posted on Feb, 18 2019 @ 05:41 PM
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originally posted by: trollz

I have a feeling this discovery will be far more important than people realize.



Ummm...and for all the best...most nefarious reasons...

#hackahuman...





YouSir



posted on Feb, 18 2019 @ 05:45 PM
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a reply to: trollz




The team managed to simulate communication across completely severed brain tissue





posted on Feb, 18 2019 @ 06:00 PM
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a reply to: trollz

I totally believe this.

My husband and I are complete soulmates.

One night we were both asleep, he dreamed something and woke up, when he did I gave him an answer to something he was dreaming about. We both thought that was weird and funny.

So for all the fellas out there, be careful what you are dreaming about



posted on Feb, 18 2019 @ 06:08 PM
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a reply to: tayton

WOW!!!



posted on Feb, 18 2019 @ 06:10 PM
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Now we know mind control is possible via WiFi. Tin foil hat from now on.



posted on Feb, 18 2019 @ 06:20 PM
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When we sleep, our brain periodically creates mysterious "neural waves" to generate electrical fields that,
Sort of, but really just the same old same old electrochemical stuff going on all the time. The research, from 6 months ago is pretty cool but it has nothing to do with what the RT article says. What it's about is how brain cells creates rythmic signals without outside help. They found this by...muahaha...removing the brains of mousies. Muahaha.


Mice of either sex were anaesthetized by isoflurane and euthanized by decapitation. The brain was removed rapidly from the skull and was put (0–5°C) in high‐sucrose artificial cerebrospinal fluid (S‐aCSF) containing (in mM): sucrose, 220; KCl, 3.0; NaH2PO4, 1.25; NaHCO3, 26; d‐glucose, 10; MgSO4, 2; CaCl2, 2; and bubbled with a 95% O2–5% CO2 gas mixture. The hippocampus was dissected from the brain, cut longitudinally in a thickness of 400 μm, and then incubated in a bubbled normal aCSF at room temperature containing (in mM): NaCl, 125; KCl, 3.75; KH2PO4, 1.25; d‐glucose, 10; NaHCO3, 26; MgSO4, 2; CaCl2, 2.

physoc.onlinelibrary.wiley.com...


edit on 2/18/2019 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 18 2019 @ 06:28 PM
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a reply to: Phage




removing the brains of mousies. Muahaha.


I heard that the chineses were rubbing bald mice with mcdonalds french fry grease to make their hair grow.



posted on Feb, 18 2019 @ 06:47 PM
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a reply to: tayton

It's so funny you should say that and I know it's true.. I was with my ex from ages 13-31. And over the years there has been at least 5 times where we have both woken up confused and looked at each other in the am almost dazed like. Just to find out we had IDENTICAL dreams to the T. I can't even describe the feeling. So this new discovery is no surprise.



posted on Feb, 18 2019 @ 06:51 PM
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originally posted by: Phage

When we sleep, our brain periodically creates mysterious "neural waves" to generate electrical fields that,
Sort of, but really just the same old same old electrochemical stuff going on all the time. The research, from 6 months ago is pretty cool but it has nothing to do with what the RT article says. What it's about is how brain cells creates rythmic signals without outside help. They found this by...muahaha...removing the brains of mousies. Muahaha.


Mice of either sex were anaesthetized by isoflurane and euthanized by decapitation. The brain was removed rapidly from the skull and was put (0–5°C) in high‐sucrose artificial cerebrospinal fluid (S‐aCSF) containing (in mM): sucrose, 220; KCl, 3.0; NaH2PO4, 1.25; NaHCO3, 26; d‐glucose, 10; MgSO4, 2; CaCl2, 2; and bubbled with a 95% O2–5% CO2 gas mixture. The hippocampus was dissected from the brain, cut longitudinally in a thickness of 400 μm, and then incubated in a bubbled normal aCSF at room temperature containing (in mM): NaCl, 125; KCl, 3.75; KH2PO4, 1.25; d‐glucose, 10; NaHCO3, 26; MgSO4, 2; CaCl2, 2.

physoc.onlinelibrary.wiley.com...



How can it be " the same old electrochemical stuff" when what they say is that it is not? Bold mine



This slow periodic activity can generate electric fields which ‘switch on’ neighboring cells briefly,allowing for chemical-free communication across gaps in the brain.
The team managed to simulate communication across completely severed brain tissue while the separate pieces remained in close proximity.


This is the biggie



“We’ve known about these waves for a long time, but no one knows their exact function andno one believed they could spontaneously propagate,”



posted on Feb, 18 2019 @ 06:56 PM
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All we need is an antenna and power booster. Hmmm. the high voltage low amp charge on a tree and they are huge antennas. Come to think of it, when I hooked up the fault finder to the tree, the other trees within thirty feet all had a signal. so maybe just being barefooted will act as an antenna, but watch for lightning.
There are bugs on trees, I don't hug them.



posted on Feb, 18 2019 @ 06:57 PM
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As Phage mentioned, this was research from a study done on mice. Animal models do not always correlate with human models, so frequently the poor creatures live out their short miserable laboratory lives only to die in vain. I hate what is done to rodents in "the name of science", but I do try to honor them for their contributions that have helped humanity.
edit on 2182019 by seattlerat because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 18 2019 @ 07:09 PM
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I will be needing to watch this story for any developments. Think of the technologies which can be created with this. Perhaps a new computer interface, or data download system, or communications technologies in a hat.



posted on Feb, 18 2019 @ 07:18 PM
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a reply to: 772STi

Yes. It's pretty nice and amazing when it happens!



posted on Feb, 18 2019 @ 07:25 PM
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a reply to: UncleTomahawk

It doesn't work, trust me



posted on Feb, 18 2019 @ 07:28 PM
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In tbe neat future, those lovely tree wannabe cell towers will be walled off and guarded by Some, who've graduated up to ar-15s. Let's hope they don't take anti depression pills.




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