It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

Woman partially pulled from Southwest Airlines 737 in flight

page: 6
26
<< 3  4  5    7  8 >>

log in

join
share:

posted on Apr, 18 2018 @ 04:55 PM
link   
a reply to: manuelram16

They would have been in trouble if they took longer to get down, or there was smoke in the cabin.




posted on Apr, 18 2018 @ 05:20 PM
link   
Mandatory inspections are being ordered for all CFM56-7B engines in operation. Several airlines have said they were already inspecting their engines after the separation of the cowling on a Southwest 737 in 2016.

airwaysmag.com...



posted on Apr, 18 2018 @ 07:06 PM
link   
a reply to: Zaphod58


That was the first thing I noticed when I saw the FB video on the news!

"Dude! That goes over your nose too! And you strap it down because if the plane suddenly drops, you are not going to be able to hold on!" It was a serious *facepalm* moment. I mean, hasn't any of these people seen Fight Club? Even Airplane! shows how to put the air masks on.

The air masks also help when you land and there is smoke. smh.



posted on Apr, 18 2018 @ 07:57 PM
link   
a reply to: Zaphod58

Thnaks for that -




posted on Apr, 19 2018 @ 12:14 AM
link   
The blade in question broke in two places. It appears that it broke near the hub first, which caused a second break about halfway down the blade. The hub end of the blade had been recovered, and shows cracking that began on the interior of the blade.

Immediately after the engine explosion the aircraft rolled left 41.5 degrees. The crew rapidly recovered to wings level, and began a descent.

According to passengers, the passenger that was fatally injured was pulled through the window to her waist before passengers were able to pull her back.

www.flightglobal.com...



posted on Apr, 19 2018 @ 01:12 AM
link   
a reply to: TEOTWAWKIAIFF

one of them still has headphones on - some people deserve to die



posted on Apr, 19 2018 @ 01:18 AM
link   
a reply to: burdman30ott6

That third option.

Drive. Possibly even walk.


Damn.



posted on Apr, 19 2018 @ 01:20 AM
link   
a reply to: Zaphod58

Can't say as I really blame him. That's beyond nightmare...and I've some duzzies.



posted on Apr, 19 2018 @ 01:26 AM
link   
a reply to: Flyingclaydisk

Definitely.

Did his job, and was a complete professional. Hats off to him.



posted on Apr, 19 2018 @ 01:29 AM
link   
a reply to: JAGStorm


Everyone is forgetting the most important part, the plane landed and everyone lived!

How amazing is that!

I don't know if I would call that amazing. In my world it's sort of... expected?

As is the machine NOT missing part of itself when it lands... redneck is just fine and dandy right here on solid ground, thank you very much.

TheRedneck



posted on Apr, 19 2018 @ 02:07 AM
link   
a reply to: TheRedneck

so I read that she was partially put the window and they pulled her in...there were emts on the plane they did cpr for twenty minutes....she had bad injuries to her face and head and they were traumatized....zap I have a question..I read that there is a ring that is supposed to contain the engine parts if the engine breaks up,....what do you think happened



posted on Apr, 19 2018 @ 02:15 AM
link   
a reply to: research100

That would indicate she went out of the window face-first. Broken window glass would explain the injuries to her face, and decompression from the altitude would explain the lungs.

So, her last sight was of being dragged by a plane through the upper atmosphere without any protection... probably felt like her lungs were being pulled from her chest through her mouth.

Yeah, I think redneck is just fine and freakin' dandy right here on the ground. Only way I'm flying is if I'm driving/pre-flighting the thing myself.

TheRedneck



posted on Apr, 19 2018 @ 02:29 AM
link   
a reply to: research100

They put kevlar to contain the engine parts in an uncontained failure, but it's not perfect. Most of the time it works, but if the ring cowling is damaged and the air gets a grip on it, it'll rip that cowling apart. This is the first time in a very long time the fuselage has taken this kind of damage from an engine coming apart.



posted on Apr, 19 2018 @ 02:36 AM
link   
she died from trauma to the head and torso,

being sucked half way out a planes window at 30,000 ft don't help tho.

Hopefullly se died from the engine fan before she got sucked out and flapped around at 560mph outside.

That has to suck way bad.

The pilot was the first F-18 female pilot.




posted on Apr, 19 2018 @ 03:00 AM
link   

originally posted by: Trillium
a reply to: Zaphod58

Any way to find out why
Same plane was canceleed yesterday.

Twitter



Just had a check - the plane that was canceled that day you mentioned wasn't the same one as the one in this accident. Same flight number, different plane, different day

Source



posted on Apr, 19 2018 @ 11:43 AM
link   
a reply to: ignorant_ape



Bobby Laurie worked on US airlines for 10 years and helped develop some of the emergency training guides used by American Airlines.

He told the BBC that when he saw the footage from the flight, the masks were the first thing he noticed.

"Obviously everyone's in a situation they didn't expect and they're panicking. But a safety demonstration is done at the start of every flight no matter where you're flying in the world!"

How important is the demonstration advice?

In one word, "very" - according to experienced pilot and aviation safety expert Phil Croucher.

"The airline can't do everything for you. There's a responsibility on the passenger as well," he says.

BBC.com, news, Southwest Airlines emergency sparks on-board safety warnings.

The tweet Bobby Laurie sent out is even more damning of the passangers:


PEOPLE: Listen to your flight attendants! ALMOST EVERYONE in this photo from @SouthwestAir #SWA1380 today is wearing their mask WRONG. Put down the phone, stop with the selfies.. and LISTEN. **Cover your NOSE & MOUTH. #crewlife #psa #listen #travel #news #wn1380
10:14 AM - Apr 17, 2018

(same source)


Some people do deserve their fate for their own stupidity. But it should not endanger mine because some blockhead is trying to get their overhead bag when there is only 90 seconds to deboard when the slides are inflated.



posted on Apr, 20 2018 @ 11:13 AM
link   
CFM is expected to issue a Service Bulletin, backed up by an FAA AD, in the next couple of weeks requiring ultrasonic inspection of CFM56-7B engines that have accrued more than 15,000 cycles since their last shop visit. The NTSB has identified a crack that propagated from the fan blade dovetail.

The FAA proposed an AD in August 2017, that would require inspections within six months for engines with more than 15,000 cycles since a shop visit, and 18 months for less than 15,000. CFM requested dropping it to 12 months, Southwest requested 18 months, and American 20. On the day of the failure, the engine in question had 10,000 cycles on it when the failure occurred.

The containment ring of the engine is still intact. The blade was pushed forward at the time of the failure, and hit forward of the containment ring.

www.flightglobal.com...



posted on Apr, 20 2018 @ 12:11 PM
link   
a reply to: Zaphod58

I'm confused... if the Service Bulletin covers engines which have more than 15,000 cycles and the engine that failed had 10,000 cycles on it at the time, how does this help matters?

It seems to me that a crack from a dovetail would fall into the category of "design issues." I am not intimately familiar with the exact configurations, but it seems to me that there was a problem either with the blade design around the dovetail itself or a materials issue that made the material of the blade susceptible to stress fractures at that point. That issue needs to be addressed, not just ignored in favor of a required check that would not have impacted this engine in the first place.

Am I missing something?

TheRedneck



posted on Apr, 20 2018 @ 12:58 PM
link   
a reply to: TheRedneck

It's the government, man!

You didn't expect them to actually "help" something, did you????



posted on Apr, 20 2018 @ 01:16 PM
link   
a reply to: TheRedneck

The way I read it is 15,000 cycles in X time period, 10,000 cycles in X + six months, or, 10,000 with so many take off and landings in another time span.

I don't believe it was a strict number of cycles but a number of cycles with a combination of "time" and/or "take offs".

I think they are going to remove and x-ray every single blade of that make of engine now (I think that is what PBS reported last night).



new topics

top topics



 
26
<< 3  4  5    7  8 >>

log in

join