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Woman partially pulled from Southwest Airlines 737 in flight

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posted on Apr, 18 2018 @ 12:22 AM
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a reply to: Zaphod58

And his face mask didn't rip off - how did he survive?




posted on Apr, 18 2018 @ 12:30 AM
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a reply to: TheConstruKctionofLight

What face mask. And he didn't.



posted on Apr, 18 2018 @ 12:47 AM
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NTSB photos show one fan blade missing and several bent blades.

According to passengers on the flight, one of the pilots was Tammy Jo Shults. Ms Shults was one of the first female fighter pilots in the Navy, as well as one of the first female F-18 pilots. While she was unable to fly combat, she did become an aggressor pilot before resigning her commission and becoming a pilot for Southwest in 1993.

foxtrotalpha.jalopnik.com...



posted on Apr, 18 2018 @ 01:18 AM
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a reply to: Zaphod58

This may be a stupid question but is out of the realm of possibilities that a large bird could have caused this? I know freak accidents do happen. And so does poor maintenance. What do you think may have caused this to happen?




posted on Apr, 18 2018 @ 01:24 AM
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a reply to: Allaroundyou

A blade snapped. One of the NTSB photos you can clearly see a single blade missing. It used to be not uncommon to have uncontained engine failures throw shrapnel into the cabin. Now they line the cowling with kevlar to prevent that. In this case the blade was from the fan section and damaged the cowling, and the airflow ripped it off.



posted on Apr, 18 2018 @ 03:09 AM
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Part of the cowling was found in the town that my sister lives in, Bernville, PA.
Fox News
edit on b000000302018-04-18T03:10:03-05:0003America/ChicagoWed, 18 Apr 2018 03:10:03 -0500300000018 by butcherguy because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 18 2018 @ 03:44 AM
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European regulators had ordered that these engines were to be inspected prior to this it seems?


European regulators this month began requiring an inspection by early next year of the type of engine that blew apart on a fatal Southwest Airlines flight on Tuesday, and a source said U.S. regulators were near a similar rule.

The actions by regulators show that there has been some concern, albeit non-urgent, about the engine, a workhorse of the global civil aviation fleet that has logged more than 350 million hours of safe travel but was also being examined after a 2016 accident.


www.reuters.com/article/us-pennsylvania-airplane-engine/regulators-had-ordered-inspections-of-engine-type-that-blew-apart-on-southwest-plane-idUSKBN1H P0QK



posted on Apr, 18 2018 @ 03:51 AM
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a reply to: Zaphod58

pet peeve - she was partially PUSHED out - not pulled



posted on Apr, 18 2018 @ 04:26 AM
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Tower also gave her the wrong runway at first, and she was like “so, 27R now? Okay, don’t worry about us guys. Just missing part of the plane and a person was apparently sucked out... Oh, what’s that, yeah 27L. Thanks. Have a pleasant day. I’ll just stop up here by the firetruck.”



posted on Apr, 18 2018 @ 05:46 AM
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a reply to: solidshot
There are so many things wrong with that Reuters report I wouldn't pay it much attention. For starters, what inspection mandated by EASA? There are any number of things an AD type inspection could be called out for but the article doesn't state what just some sideways comments about blades, cracks and mention of metal fatigue in direct relation to this incident by the NTSB chairman. As a further example it also specifically mentions a quote from a Qantas spokesperson who was asked for comment that allegedly states QF doesn't operate the -7B model, to which I say total b*****it. QF operates a mixture of both -5 and -7 series CFM56's and that includes the 7B, god knows I have worked on enough of them. In fact if memory serves me one of our batches was originally destined for South West who ran into financial trouble at the time they were being built and QF stepped in and snapped them up. And so far I am unaware of any urgent inspection mandates prior to this. The point is that ALL engines periodically have AD's or even sometimes emergency AD's issued so there is no reason to panic over the CFM-56, it is one of or possibly the most widely used and hours logged engine in history. A single inaccurate report does not make for justifiable concern.



posted on Apr, 18 2018 @ 07:16 AM
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posted on Apr, 18 2018 @ 10:13 AM
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a reply to: kathael

And if you listen to the USAir 1549 tapes, both the controller and Sully repeatedly used the wrong flight number on the radio. That was one minor mistake in an otherwise perfectly handled situation, and it was immediately corrected.



posted on Apr, 18 2018 @ 10:38 AM
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a reply to: six67seven

Me too, flying southwest next Wednesday to Reno....



posted on Apr, 18 2018 @ 10:43 AM
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The passenger killed was Jennifer Riordan, a Wells Fargo Bank executive from Albuquerque, New Mexico.

Early reports from the NTSB show the fan hub showed signs of metal fatigue.



posted on Apr, 18 2018 @ 11:17 AM
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a reply to: Zaphod58

That oxygen thingy fighter pilots use.
Sorry to hear that he didnt survive. I'm not that clued up on the incident thats why I asked.



posted on Apr, 18 2018 @ 11:35 AM
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a reply to: TheConstruKctionofLight

Large transport aircraft don't wear helmets and masks, if they're wearing anything it's just a headset.



posted on Apr, 18 2018 @ 11:37 AM
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If you look at the pictures the passengers got even more lucky than even they realize. Not one of them is wearing the mask even close to properly.

runwaygirlnetwork.com...
edit on 4/18/2018 by Zaphod58 because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 18 2018 @ 11:53 AM
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There was a service bulletin issued the week of April 9th calling for inspections of the engine after an undisclosed 2016 incident.



posted on Apr, 18 2018 @ 04:47 PM
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originally posted by: Zaphod58
If you look at the pictures the passengers got even more lucky than even they realize. Not one of them is wearing the mask even close to properly.

runwaygirlnetwork.com...


First thing I noticed in the news, they all wore it on their mouth, not nose-mouth



posted on Apr, 18 2018 @ 04:48 PM
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Local coverage (with photos) of debris from engine where it fell in Berks County, PA.
WFMZ



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