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What is the source of cold in the universe?

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posted on Nov, 26 2017 @ 01:04 AM
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Following this along i was already aware that heat is derived from atoms/molecules movement from energy. But i was just wondering, is it even possible for anything to actually reach absolute zero? Cause if it has no temperature then it cant have any movement, which would mean you have zero energy? Is it possible for an object to exist with zero energy


Is it similar to the impossibility of reaching the speed of light?
Maybe the maths is wrong...





originally posted by: glend
I always envisaged heat as energy (vibration) and cold as lack of energy (stillness). So Absolute Zero is the temperature when molecules stop vibrating even though quantum mechanics states that even at absolute zero the molecule does not achieve zero energy.




posted on Nov, 26 2017 @ 01:18 AM
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At first I thought this HAD to be a troll thread. It still reads like one.

Asking "what is the source of cold" is very much the same thing as asking, "why aren't molecules zipping all over the place without any source of energy?"

And it should be obvious that motion requires energy, and molecules cannot go zipping all over the place without some source of energy.

Ergo, the default tendency of all things is to remain at rest. And in this case, when molecules are at rest, we refer to this state as "cold."

Cold is what we call it when there is no energy to excite subatomic particles.

Ergo, it truly does not require a source. It is what we call it when there isn't any energy.

And if that doesn't clear it up, maybe this will:

Think of cold and hot as being descriptors of the amount of energy present in the system (whatever system -- it doesn't matter).

When there is a lot of energy, we call it "hot." When there is a little energy, we call it "cold."

But the input into the system, in both cases, is ENERGY.

When there is no energy, we call it ABSOLUTE ZERO (never mind quantum fluctuations -- this conversation does not require that level of complexity.)

So yes, "cold" is simply the absence of energy.


edit on 26-11-2017 by Dudemo5 because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 26 2017 @ 01:48 AM
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The cause of cold in space is really due to the vast distance from a heat source...
The energy level may be lower in cold objects but that's because they are cold not the cause of cold...



posted on Nov, 26 2017 @ 02:12 AM
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a reply to: Willtell


What is the source of cold in the universe?


would it not be lack of energy?

or in other words, lack of movement of "particles"




posted on Nov, 26 2017 @ 08:16 AM
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Most likely due to expansion of the universe. As molecules become farther apart, the temperature approaches absolute zero, or -273.5 C. However, even at absolute zero there is still quantum mechanical zero point energy.
Interesting enough, and I didn't know this until I researched it, the temperature of a substance approaches absolute zero asymptotically. In other words, it gets closer and closer to absolute zero but never actually reaches zero.

This is the guy who can answer your question in more detail: www.abovetopsecret.com...

Good article about mysterious cold spot:

What Created the Universe’s Cold Spot?

A super(void) explanation

By Heather Goss
Air & Space Magazine | Subscribe
June 2015




What Created the Universe’s Cold Spot? A super(void) explanation By Heather Goss AIR & SPACE MAGAZINE | SUBSCRIBE JUNE 2015 5540290 The cold spot is a mystery astronomers have been trying to solve for about a decade. In 2004, a NASA satellite surveying the cosmic microwave background—the first light after the Big Bang—found an enormous cold spot, also observed later by the European Space Agency’s Planck satellite. While the temperature of the background radiation varies across the universe, this strangely cool spot was significantly larger than any other. Read more at www.airspacemag.com...


www.airspacemag.com...






edit on 26-11-2017 by Phantom423 because: (no reason given)

edit on 26-11-2017 by Phantom423 because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 26 2017 @ 01:45 PM
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a reply to: Willtell

A lack of heat, is the source of cold. In that, as the universe expands, the energy which you might consider heat, does not go quite as far as it used too.



posted on Nov, 30 2017 @ 10:42 AM
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a reply to: Akragon

That's the official scientific answer right there.




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