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Some nice "not staged" submarine footage

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posted on May, 2 2017 @ 05:06 PM
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Hi all,

While surfing the net came across some footage of a Dutch submarine leaving a port recently.
Nothing new, or extremely spectacular, but it does gives a nice perspective of scale, size of another kind of sub as the Nuclear big boys most of us have seen. And as i'm dutch, some healthy pride as well I thought i would share it here.

This one is a Walrus class submarine

"Walrus-class submarines are solely operated by the Royal Netherlands Navy (RNLN). They are considered as one of the most advanced non-nuclear attack submarines in the world. The Walrus-class was put into service for the first time in 1990 with the Dutch Navy."
Naval Technology link
Rumors say one of those took out a battle group once in a NATO exercise.
Dutch Submarine Sinks Half of US Navy CTF in 1990 and more

It's some good not staged footage of the sub navigating a narrow passage while leaving a foreign port.
Navigating the river.

Note: On a close up it looks like one of the crew on the tower has a different color uniform.. any experts?




Edit: The sound of seagulls make's me happy just by itself!
edit on 2-5-2017 by EartOccupant because: Torpedo's




posted on May, 2 2017 @ 05:21 PM
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Diesel boats are extremely hard to find until they snorkel to recharge their batteries. Then they become more vulnerable to detection from ASW assets. The world biggest game of hide and seek.



posted on May, 2 2017 @ 05:28 PM
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a reply to: Nickn3

Newer AIP boats can stay under longer and are much quieter. The German 212 class can go three weeks without snorkeling, and reach 20 knots submerged. They still have to snorkel, but they're a lot more dangerous than traditional SSKs.



posted on May, 2 2017 @ 05:29 PM
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a reply to: EartOccupant

Not classified enough...


During the exercise, a Canadian submarine slipped quietly through a carrier's destroyer screen, and conducted a devastating simulated torpedo attack on the ship. The submarine was never detected, and when the exercise umpire, a U.S. Navy officer, pronounced the carrier dead, his official report was promptly stamped classified to minimize the potential fallout.


The potential fallout is that modern, quieter subs have the edge again. They utilize the same tactics used in WWII; hiding in background noise 'clutter', slipping undetected during vulnerable opportunities into the middle of armadas (WTH)

Chinese have done it...

googled

Aussies, too...
Carrier Strike Groups are more vulnerable than ever. What you expect sticking to WWII obsolete bobbing cork technology?

edit on 2-5-2017 by intrptr because: clarity



posted on May, 2 2017 @ 05:34 PM
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a reply to: intrptr

I guess it comes down to either space or the deep...



posted on May, 2 2017 @ 05:47 PM
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originally posted by: EartOccupant
a reply to: intrptr

I guess it comes down to either space or the deep...



Add modern anti shipping missiles, rocket mines and torpedoes to that list.
The age of projecting force by super carrier dreadnought is coming to a close.

At the opening of WWII the Japanese showed how sea air power made mince meat of the British Navy, including their carrier. And that was the day of propeller driven aircraft. The Americans learned from that lesson, destroying the Japanese surface Navy by carrier borne aircraft and submarine as well.

Nowadays its all about the hypersonic, sea skimming anti shipping missile and the new stealthy diesel submarines.

Proof is in the pudding, navies are demonstrating this lately and oh, so did the Yemenis...



posted on May, 2 2017 @ 05:54 PM
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a reply to: intrptr

I agree, its be seen.. be death, or faster.

Buth on submarines... here is a nice one
Cornelis Drebbel.. One of the forgotten genius of history ( i might do a topic of him someday)
Was subbing around in 1620 ...Drebbel Submarines





edit on 2-5-2017 by EartOccupant because: Hydrophone noise



posted on May, 2 2017 @ 05:58 PM
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a reply to: intrptr

Leaving out, yet again, that the HSV-2 had no weapons, except 4 .50 caliber machine guns, and was hit by subsonic missiles. Oh, and didn't sink.

Wow, that really does wonders to prove your point.



posted on May, 2 2017 @ 06:27 PM
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Actually i find the term "diesel submarine" becoming a bit outdated.
Besides it should be diesel - electric to make it more clear about the principle.

More interesting is the re-rise of the Stirling engine in submarine's ( or in general)



posted on May, 2 2017 @ 06:28 PM
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originally posted by: Zaphod58
a reply to: intrptr

Leaving out, yet again, that the HSV-2 had no weapons, except 4 .50 caliber machine guns, and was hit by subsonic missiles. Oh, and didn't sink.

Wow, that really does wonders to prove your point.


Here they are towing it in. This really was not military it was used to haul equipment by a private company. But the insurance company made them tow it back to port lol.

wam.ae...

PS looks alot like an RPG attack to me
edit on 5/2/17 by dragonridr because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 2 2017 @ 06:42 PM
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a reply to: intrptr

The Yemeni armed forces don't have any submarines. They have fast attack boats, coastal patrol boats and a small fleet of two or three Soviet missile corvettes. Your video proves nothing.

Scroll down to the "Naval Power" section of the report, please.
edit on 2-5-2017 by AnonyMason because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 2 2017 @ 06:47 PM
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As an educated guess, I think the person in the different colored uniform is probably a harbor pilot-- a local expert who is familiar with the congested waterways of the port who is brought on board to help the captain navigate in or out.

a reply to: EartOccupant



posted on May, 2 2017 @ 06:54 PM
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a reply to: dragonridr

There are conflicting reports. Some say shoulder fired missiles, the Houthi said they were C802s. Either way, they were subsonic against a ship with no defenses beyond crew served weapons.



posted on May, 2 2017 @ 09:11 PM
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originally posted by: Zaphod58
a reply to: intrptr

Leaving out, yet again, that the HSV-2 had no weapons, except 4 .50 caliber machine guns, and was hit by subsonic missiles. Oh, and didn't sink.

Wow, that really does wonders to prove your point.

It probably launched from a truck, the radar installation that guided the missile was bombed by US jets soon after, bearing out how US thought (in retrospect) what a threat that position posed to shipping.

Glad to see you responding to me again...



posted on May, 2 2017 @ 09:20 PM
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originally posted by: Zaphod58
a reply to: dragonridr

There are conflicting reports. Some say shoulder fired missiles, the Houthi said they were C802s. Either way, they were subsonic against a ship with no defenses beyond crew served weapons.

One missile one hit. That kind of damage isn't RPGs or unguided rockets...

Image



posted on May, 2 2017 @ 09:31 PM
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originally posted by: AnonyMason
a reply to: intrptr

The Yemeni armed forces don't have any submarines. They have fast attack boats, coastal patrol boats and a small fleet of two or three Soviet missile corvettes. Your video proves nothing.


I never said Yemen 'has submarines'. Its their video, not mine. The image of the damaged ship tells all^^^. They had at least one shore battery of guided missiles.

Attacking the radar installations that fired the missiles, just another "proves nothing" action taken by the uS Navy.


These radars were active during previous attacks and attempted attacks on ships in the Red Sea, including last week's attack on the USA-flagged vessel "Swift-2"...


NPR



posted on May, 2 2017 @ 10:15 PM
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a reply to: EartOccupant

from your link




During the exercise, a Canadian submarine slipped quietly through a carrier's destroyer screen, and conducted a devastating simulated torpedo attack on the ship. The submarine was never detected, and when the exercise umpire, a U.S. Navy officer, pronounced the carrier dead,his official report was promptly stamped classified to minimize the potential fallout.




While Canadian submarines have routinely taken on U.S. Navy carriers, other small navies have enjoyed similar victories. The Royal Netherlands Navy, with its small force of extremely quiet diesel submarines, has made the U.S. Navy eat the proverbial slice of humble pie on more than one occasion. In 1989, naval analyst Norman Polmar wrote in Naval Forces that during NATO s exercise Northern Star, the Dutch submarine Zwaardvis was the only orange (enemy) submarine to successfully stalk and sink a blue (allied) aircraft carrier Ten years later there were reports that the Dutch submarine Walrus had been even more successful in the exercise JTFEX/TMDI99.



posted on May, 2 2017 @ 11:14 PM
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a reply to: intrptr

And, again, against an unarmed ship incapable of defending itself using subsonic missiles. It does nothing for your point.
edit on 5/2/2017 by Zaphod58 because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 2 2017 @ 11:21 PM
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originally posted by: TheConstruKctionofLight
a reply to: EartOccupant

from your link




During the exercise, a Canadian submarine slipped quietly through a carrier's destroyer screen, and conducted a devastating simulated torpedo attack on the ship. The submarine was never detected, and when the exercise umpire, a U.S. Navy officer, pronounced the carrier dead,his official report was promptly stamped classified to minimize the potential fallout.




While Canadian submarines have routinely taken on U.S. Navy carriers, other small navies have enjoyed similar victories. The Royal Netherlands Navy, with its small force of extremely quiet diesel submarines, has made the U.S. Navy eat the proverbial slice of humble pie on more than one occasion. In 1989, naval analyst Norman Polmar wrote in Naval Forces that during NATO s exercise Northern Star, the Dutch submarine Zwaardvis was the only orange (enemy) submarine to successfully stalk and sink a blue (allied) aircraft carrier Ten years later there were reports that the Dutch submarine Walrus had been even more successful in the exercise JTFEX/TMDI99.




Would not happen in real combat for one the US navy has restricted use of active sonar do to hazards caused to marine life. So detection during games is only passive that wouldnt be the case in a war.



posted on May, 3 2017 @ 06:39 AM
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I'm glad we have solved the Yemen (who do apparently not own subs) question and the strange (PR) attack on a strange ship in a topic about Dutch (diesel/electric) submarines.




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