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Chemtrails on their way to be exposed for what...and who they are.

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posted on Apr, 13 2017 @ 01:30 AM
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a reply to: txjab512

They're going to spritz the atmosphere with water? A bit of water????!!!!!!!?????

I'm stunned. I'll stop misting my plants, cuz I don't want to be a geoengineer.


edit on 4/13/2017 by Phage because: (no reason given)




posted on Apr, 13 2017 @ 01:36 AM
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a reply to: Phage

Diamond dust, sparklies.


The first stage of the test could occur as soon as next year, using only water and aiming to test the methodology and technology of the experiment itself. As the study progresses, new substances may be introduced and examined — including calcium carbonate, sulfates, or even diamond dust.

edit on 13-4-2017 by D8Tee because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 13 2017 @ 01:38 AM
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a reply to: D8Tee

Heh.

I've been looking for their actual proposal (because they're going to need a lot of steenkin' permits and that means public record stuff).



posted on Apr, 13 2017 @ 01:52 AM
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a reply to: Phage

Somewhere there must be someone who can organize a protest against this.

I'm busy that weekend.

Stratospheric Solar Geoengineering David Keith, Harvard



Injecting sulfate aerosol into the stratosphere, the most frequently analyzed proposal for solar geoengineering, may reduce some climate risks, but it would also entail new risks, including ozone loss and heating of the lower tropical stratosphere, which, in turn, would increase water vapor concentration causing additional ozone loss and surface warming. We propose a method for stratospheric aerosol climate modification that uses a solid aerosol composed of alkaline metal salts that will convert hydrogen halides and nitric and sulfuric acids into stable salts to enable stratospheric geoengineering while reducing or reversing ozone depletion.

edit on 13-4-2017 by D8Tee because: (no reason given)


=sm_og_vocabulary%3Ataxonomy_term%3A111706]The Keith Group
edit on 13-4-2017 by D8Tee because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 13 2017 @ 02:02 AM
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a reply to: D8Tee

David Keith is cautious when it comes to implementation of the technology he is working on.

You may have noted that the abstract you linked is about a realization that injection of sulfates (which is what volcanoes do, and a topic of study in regard to geoengineering) would have adverse effects on ozone levels in the stratosphere. The study is about the feasibility of substituting calcite for sulfate, specifically in regard to its effect on ozone.

Plan A (sulfates): bad idea
Plan B (calcite): Maybe, but...
Plan C ?


Do you think geoengineering via SRM is a viable solution to warming, which you don't think is happening?



posted on Apr, 13 2017 @ 02:14 AM
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a reply to: Phage

The 1930's are still the warmest decade on instrumental record. Do I have to qualify that with "in the USA' given that this was the picture of the African continents coverage?


I would not be in agreement with this program of testing.

They can model away like they do with our climate data all they want.

Stratospheric testing, once they start, they won't stop, they will be begging money from whoever to keep the project alive and growing.



posted on Apr, 13 2017 @ 02:21 AM
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a reply to: D8Tee

The 1930's are still the warmest decade on instrumental record.
I'd like to see the supporting data. In the meantime, so what? The record is full of spikes. Spikes on a trend.




I would not be in agreement with this program of testing.
What testing is proposed? Did you find the permit applications?


edit on 4/13/2017 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 13 2017 @ 02:24 AM
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originally posted by: Phage
a reply to: D8Tee

The 1930's are still the warmest decade on instrumental record.
I'd like to see the supporting data. In the meantime, so what? The record is full of spikes. Spikes on a trend.




I would not be in agreement with this program of testing.
What testing is proposed?
I'm unsure as of yet what testing is proposed, this is new to me.

If you find more info I'd be interested in reading it.



posted on Apr, 13 2017 @ 02:24 AM
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a reply to: Phage



Plan B (calcite): Maybe, but...

go on...



posted on Apr, 13 2017 @ 02:26 AM
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a reply to: kibric

...
There needs to be a hella lot of research done before dumping it into the stratosphere by the ton.



posted on Apr, 13 2017 @ 02:30 AM
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a reply to: Phage

on calcite ?



posted on Apr, 13 2017 @ 02:31 AM
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a reply to: kibric

On anything.



posted on Apr, 13 2017 @ 02:36 AM
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a reply to: Phage

but calcite crystals in the stratosphere ?
what would happen ?



posted on Apr, 13 2017 @ 02:43 AM
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a reply to: kibric

The most obvious thing would be that short wavelength solar radiation would be partially reflected into space. That's a fact.

The questions:

What effects may there be on atmospheric chemistry?
How persistent/reversible would the effects (beneficial and detrimental) be?
How likely are unforeseen and undesirable effects?

Plenty of subcategories to each of the above.



posted on Apr, 13 2017 @ 02:48 AM
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a reply to: Phage


"Releasing engineered nano-sized disks, or sulfuric acid in a condensable vapor above the Earth, are two novel approaches. These approaches offer advantages over simply putting sulfur dioxide gas into the atmosphere," says David Keith, a director in the Institute for Sustainable Energy, Environment and Economy and a Schulich School of Engineering professor.

Keith, a global leader in investigating this topic, says that geoengineering, or engineering the climate on a global scale, is an imperfect science.

"It cannot offset the risks that come from increased carbon dioxide in the atmosphere. If we don't halt man-made CO2 emissions, no amount of climate engineering can eliminate the problems -- massive emissions reductions are still necessary."

Nevertheless, Keith believes that research on geoengineering technologies, their effectiveness and environmental impacts needs to be expanded.

"I think the stakes are simply too high at this point to think that ignorance is a good policy."

Keith suggests two novel geoengineering approaches -- 'levitating' engineered nano-particles, and the airborne release of sulfuric acid -- in two newly published studies. One study was authored by Keith alone, and the other with scientists in Canada, the U.S. and Switzerland.
Link to article

Small scale testing with hard and fast limits on how much they can play with, sure go ahead, let the cat out of the bag.

Next thing you know, they'll be lobbying to go full scale, I don't get to make the rules so lets see what happens of it then.

Caveat, I wanna see big rainbows in the blue sky.



posted on Apr, 13 2017 @ 02:49 AM
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a reply to: Phage

not just a pretty face
might need a shave
I guess you gather i'm asking questions I know



What effects may there be on atmospheric chemistry?

short of doing it
try it in a microcosm ?



posted on Apr, 13 2017 @ 02:53 AM
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a reply to: D8Tee




Link to article

Which is more than 6 years old. Do you think that David Keith's work has never been looked at here?


Small scale testing with hard and fast limits on how much they can play with, sure go ahead, let the cat out of the bag.
You mean like the indiscriminate combustion of fossil fuels? That's some serious geoengineering.



Caveat, I wanna see big rainbows in the blue sky.
I have been doing so for as long as I can remember. I also remember Pinatubo sunsets. Haven't seen anything like it for a long, long time.


edit on 4/13/2017 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 13 2017 @ 03:05 AM
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a reply to: Phage


You mean like the indiscriminate combustion of fossil fuels? That's some serious geoengineering.
All that plant food we are releasing. Hope Keith thinks to try out Potassium Sulfate to get an even increased fertilization effect.



posted on Apr, 13 2017 @ 03:08 AM
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a reply to: D8Tee

Yeah. CO2 helps plants. When they have enough nutrients and water.

Are you a plant?



posted on Apr, 13 2017 @ 03:09 AM
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a reply to: Phage


Are you a plant?

Last time I checked I had no stomata.



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