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Virginia high school banned “To Kill a Mockingbird” “Adventures of Huckleberry Finn”

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posted on Dec, 7 2016 @ 11:34 AM
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a reply to: Spiramirabilis

Think of it like this Mark Twain was the Stephen King of his time. A pop writer that wrote well but also wrote a bunch of pop-culture books. His Celebrated Jumping Frog book was literally a story he took from a drunk and anyone who thinks there is much literary significance behind A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur's Court is crazy.
edit on 7-12-2016 by Krazysh0t because: (no reason given)




posted on Dec, 7 2016 @ 11:35 AM
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a reply to: Krazysh0t

I might get around to reading it someday. I've read other Mark Twain stuff, like A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur's Court, and The Prince and the Pauper, and a couple others. My husband bought a book of Twain quotes that we keep on the coffee table, and both of us pick it up and read it often. The man was a genius at sharp wit combined with keen insight into the human psyche.

My point was only that there are many paths to learning one can choose to go down.



posted on Dec, 7 2016 @ 11:38 AM
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a reply to: kaylaluv

Naturally. That's why I suggested an alternative controversial book. Let's talk about the callousness of the elite in their disregard for taking care of the poor instead of rehashing the tired old racial dynamic. That would shake things up a bit in schools.



posted on Dec, 7 2016 @ 11:42 AM
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a reply to: Krazysh0t




Think of it like this Mark Twain was the Stephen King of his time. A pop writer that wrote well but also wrote a bunch of pop-culture books.

I agree - and I'm not as crazy about Twain as some people, but my opinion doesn't matter. My preferences don't take away from what he accomplished

If we look at it in the time it was written - it's an amazing and brave thing Twain wrote

It bothers people now, and I can see why. It's not just the N word either, though that's the easiest part to latch onto and fight about

If it's only about the writing that's one thing, but I think there might be a point where we can all decide as grownups - together - that it might be time to move on and find better ways to discuss bigotry, intolerance and tolerance than something part of the audience already understands as well as anybody is ever going to understand it

Its insulting on more than one level



posted on Dec, 7 2016 @ 11:43 AM
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a reply to: Krazysh0t

I definitely want to look into that one! Sounds interesting... Might have my 15-year-old read it too.



posted on Dec, 7 2016 @ 11:51 AM
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a reply to: kaylaluv

Yeah that book is a little older. So the controversy surrounding it has had a chance to scar and heal over for a while. So now you can also study how people over reacted to something that was obviously satire because they missed the point of the satire.

PS: If you didn't know or realize I'm a BIG fan of satire.
edit on 7-12-2016 by Krazysh0t because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 7 2016 @ 11:56 AM
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a reply to: Spiramirabilis

Well that is why I suggested an alternative to replace it. I was only half-joking too.



posted on Dec, 7 2016 @ 11:58 AM
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a reply to: Annee


Out of all that - - what I've learned is - - be nice to people. There are millions of great books in the world. My kid doesn't need what's in Huck Finn TAUGHT to him in school.

I have a very clear vision of what I'm doing.


I get that :-)

I appreciate that you can have these conversations without pandering or getting all sentimental too

It's been an interesting thread

Be nice to people - my takeaway from all this



posted on Dec, 7 2016 @ 12:01 PM
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a reply to: Krazysh0t




Well that is why I suggested an alternative to replace it. I was only half-joking too.


You know - that would actually be an interesting thread

A list of socially provocative books to replace all the books that liberals have banned and/or burned

:-)

I of course have a million good ideas - but, threads? Not so much




posted on Dec, 7 2016 @ 12:42 PM
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originally posted by: Spiramirabilis
a reply to: Annee

I read it when I was about 14. It annoyed me. I could get into why, but basically I don't like when I can see the man behind the curtain so much

I also couldn't understand why well into the 20th century I needed to hear a story written in 1884 about how a white boy finds his soul and learns there's nothing wrong with black people after all - and that they're just like humans

I understand why this book is causing such a ruckus. I also understand why people defend it. It's important - and unimportant at the same time

I do think it's important that we keep fighting about it though :-)




I couldn't have said it better.



posted on Dec, 7 2016 @ 12:44 PM
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originally posted by: Krazysh0t
A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur's Court


I've read that one. Ages ago.

I remember I enjoyed it. I like quirky.



posted on Dec, 7 2016 @ 02:40 PM
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originally posted by: Metallicus

originally posted by: Pandaram
If is it offending, it should go.. this is not 1960 when racism is ok in America. Kids are stupid and use this words like its normal to use. Just like in the stupid book.

Isnt it isis flaqs are offencive to some btw?



Thank you, Adolf. Very insightful.


Interesting that you raise the spectre of Hitler. Consider that the banning of Shakespeare's THE MERCHANT OF VENICE began in 1911 in Connecticut because Shylock the hook-nosed "non Christian" may give "children" (high school and college students) the wrong impression of our Jewish brothers and sisters.

I'd love to see you attack those who would not only censor THE MERCHANT today, but also guarantee that it's not newsworthy.

As it is, few school systems have had the courage to display their Germanophilia by trying to re-introduce the evil book. Bad things happen to public officials who don't demonstrate sufficient sensitivity to the most "poisecuted" and powerful race/religion on Earth.

Newly elected congressmen are provided with lists of "qualified Jewish candidates" as staffers, and refusing to hire most or all can result in a single term of service. The next election a well funded candidate will emerge and vicious campaign inertia will sweep "them closet Nazis" from office.

These are the same hidden forces that attacked The American Red Cross for using donations to replace worn out equipment, needed when responding to disasters. Presumably, if the money didn't buy soup and bandages then it was poorly spent.

The fact that The IRC wouldn't fund Israel's Magen David Adom (emergency service) because of their policy of saving Jews first (and Arabs and *black US Marines if they get around to it) had to be punished. This meant that the founding agency of the International Red Cross, its American arm was targeted for Zionist retaliation even as Katrina was exhausting the agency's resources.

Trucks, refrigerators, generators, etc., require periodic replacement and all operating costs of the Red Cross are from donations. And only the very stupid or the very mean spirited would attack a relief agency for such expenditures.

The real issue had nothing to do with the media reports of spent donations for Katrina. It was a warning shot signalling a protracted war if the IRC raises public awareness about Israel's "Jews First" rescue, extraction, transport and treatment policy, instead of medical triage deciding patient treatment priorities.

______________________________________________________

*after the Beirut bombing of the marine barracks Israeli hospitals refused to treat black marines, who were then flown to West Germany. Some died in route because of the delay. Israel relented under international pressure, but it was too late for some of our men. And not a word about it in the news)



posted on Dec, 7 2016 @ 04:30 PM
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originally posted by: Krazysh0t
a reply to: Spiramirabilis

Think of it like this Mark Twain was the Stephen King of his time. A pop writer that wrote well but also wrote a bunch of pop-culture books. His Celebrated Jumping Frog book was literally a story he took from a drunk and anyone who thinks there is much literary significance behind A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur's Court is crazy.

Yankee is one of first sci-fi written, and is not bad. In fact it is much better than J. Verne.
edit on 7-12-2016 by JanAmosComenius because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 7 2016 @ 11:23 PM
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At this point in the thread I can only express my disgust at the dilution of education because of feelings. Education is uncomfortable and requires a certain amount of self discipline to accomplish. Testing one's beliefs should strengthen, not weaken; unless the belief is the weaker, it will persist.



posted on Dec, 8 2016 @ 06:39 AM
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a reply to: JanAmosComenius

I'm not saying its a bad book by any means. I've read it. It's a good book and a bit funny (quirky maybe?) too. I'm just saying it doesn't have much literary merit for a school curriculum. I mean they don't even really teach Jules Verne in schools so that book wouldn't make it anyways whether it is better or not.

You need a book that stirs up controversy. Controversy creates discussion. Discussion leads to ideas. There is even merit in discussing books that have had controversy in the past but don't now just to get an idea of how these things play out. That's why I'm all for Huck Finn in schools.
edit on 8-12-2016 by Krazysh0t because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 8 2016 @ 03:04 PM
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a reply to: DBCowboy

You know, for people who claim the right are fascists, they seem to be doing quite a bit of facism themselves.

All points of history had dark times, however instead of burying it away we should embrace it and understand that there was a different method of thinking back then, and as humans, we naturally evolve our ways of handling and dealing with societal issues.

However right now the way we're dealing with free thought is just downright shameful.



posted on Dec, 8 2016 @ 05:08 PM
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a reply to: SuperblySkeptical

To prohibit or ban anything simply because someone finds it offensive is insane.



posted on Dec, 8 2016 @ 07:37 PM
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originally posted by: xuenchen
Jesus.

They're starting the book burnings !!

What's next ?



Decades ago, inner city school boards in London tried to ban "Baa baa, black sheep", "Puff the mahic dragon" and "Noddy and Big Ears".



posted on Dec, 8 2016 @ 07:46 PM
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originally posted by: DBCowboy
a reply to: SuperblySkeptical

To prohibit or ban anything simply because someone finds it offensive is insane.


You mean like age-appropriate sex ed for Kindergartners? You're right.



posted on Dec, 8 2016 @ 07:52 PM
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At the the current rate of change i wonder how long until books with references to pizza get banned....



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