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Virginia high school banned “To Kill a Mockingbird” “Adventures of Huckleberry Finn”

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posted on Dec, 6 2016 @ 09:05 PM
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originally posted by: TinySickTears
a reply to: Christosterone

of course.
the pmrc

frank zappa went up and spoke and shut the down. it was great

little fact about the music label #

zappas album jazz from hell was slapped with an offensive sticker....the album was instrumental

shows how stupid


Come on now.

Can't leave out Dee and John.



. . . . the unlikely trio of Frank Zappa, Dee Snider, and John Denver.


www.vulture.com...




posted on Dec, 6 2016 @ 09:16 PM
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a reply to: Annee



"Interesting when they're wrong.

Yet, continue to argue."


Those were your words. If you are done discussing this thread and have decided not to answer my questions then it's obvious you realize you have no good argument for the questions I posed and you are knocking over your king as a forfeit. I will take this as a victory for the written word.

Thank you and enjoy your evening.



posted on Dec, 6 2016 @ 09:30 PM
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a reply to: TheAlleghenyGentleman

Of course we're wrong.

We're against censorship.



posted on Dec, 6 2016 @ 09:34 PM
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a reply to: TheAlleghenyGentleman


IThey do not teach rap or the history of, its lyrics and meanings in schools across the US. Rap is not in the average high school curriculum and its lyrical significance is different to that of the written words of Twain.

Sometimes it helps to keep up and stay relevant. The lyrical significance? What does that even mean?

You say Twain is a national treasure. Not everyone agrees. If language is the problem and context helps us to understand why, then all art can be useful in teaching kids about anything. Race, prejudice, equality, sex, gender - life

Anyhow - this isn't me arguing for banning books. Just saying - things change

The Poetics of Hip-Hop


Analysis of hip hop music and lyrics can provide students with a greater understanding of rhythm, form, diction, and sound in poetry. Students will analyze form in Shakespearean sonnets, then analyze hip hop music to determine common characteristics between the Bard's work and the music of hip hop artists. Students will reinforce their understanding of the connections between hip hop and poetry through close analysis of the works of the poet Nikki Giovanni and hip-hop artists Jurassic 5, and through the creation of their own poetry.


Hip-hop lesson plans teach Seattle students about social issues, arts – with playlist


Hip-hop gets a bad rap. Misconstrued as vulgar, the genre actually arose as a positive alternative to gang violence in New York City during the 1970s. The subjects cover social justice, the music fuels arts and dance and the lyrics can be analyzed as poetry. Now, in a UW-affiliated project, its being used in social studies lessons for 6th-12th graders.


Hip-Hop Helps Teach Everything from English to Algebra


The intellectual awakening struck, as they often do, when Sitomer was sleep deprived, up at 2 a.m. trying to finish a lesson plan on English poet Dylan Thomas. Sitomer was restless, realizing he had to wake up at 5 a.m. to get to class. "I was focusing on Thomas's line 'Do not go gentle into that good night,'" he says.
Then it hit: Sitomer began thinking about Tupac Shakur, a deceased rapper his students idolized and whose music they often played. He went online and dove into Shakur's lyrics, and, although the rapper artist had lived a violent life and died tragically in a hail of bullets on a Las Vegas street, Sitomer saw that his writings aren't all about misogyny, homophobia, or gang violence.


What is Hip-Hop? A music, history, art and culture lesson

This lesson, re-posted on EducationWorld with permission from Seattle radio station KEXP, was created by Tiffany Producer-KEXP Documentaries. The entire series of lesson plans appears here.
Also see on EducationWorld: Hip-Hop Lesson: DJs and Turntablism
EducationWorld note: In the course of doing Internet research on hip-hop related topics, or in the course of accessing the resources (videos, Web sites, articles, etc.) listed in this lesson, students may encounter material that contains objectionable language or content. Teachers may want to limit Internet access and/or screen specific resources ahead of time to select the options that will be most appropriate for their class.


edit on 12/6/2016 by Spiramirabilis because: technical difficulties



posted on Dec, 6 2016 @ 09:37 PM
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a reply to: DBCowboy

I thought my questions were quite good. I was really hoping for an answer. I was going to enjoy tackling her second set of responses but alas, with that one, the game is won.

censorship bad. Beer good.



posted on Dec, 6 2016 @ 09:41 PM
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a reply to: Spiramirabilis

Yes, I understand rap is taught in a few select schools, I recognized that. I said it is not however taught in most schools around the nation. There will always be alternative curriculums that defy the norms. That is not what the argument here is however. This argument is about what the average high schooler will be reading or not reading.
edit on 6-12-2016 by TheAlleghenyGentleman because: Grammar



posted on Dec, 6 2016 @ 09:45 PM
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a reply to: Annee




Interesting when they're wrong. Yet, continue to argue.


If only they would argue

:-)



posted on Dec, 6 2016 @ 09:47 PM
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a reply to: Spiramirabilis

If you don't think I want to argue my points would you care to answer the questions I posed to annee?

It seems they are going unanswered and they are such nice questions ;-)
edit on 6-12-2016 by TheAlleghenyGentleman because: Grammar



posted on Dec, 6 2016 @ 09:48 PM
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a reply to: Spiramirabilis



Your question has a definite are you with us or against us quality to it anyway. Since you're not interested in nuance - I can guess why you ask


The question was: "Do you or do you not support the banning of books?" I want to know if you have a principle on this subject, or if this is a game of feelings and urges.



As far as this subject goes - concerning this school? A book that would be illegal to own. Illegal - anywhere, at any time, by anyone. Banned. Not just unavailable at a specific school for an undetermined amount of time


I agree with your definition, at least when used as an adjective. Then again, gum itself would not be illegal if it was banned at a school; and neither does gum have to be illegal everywhere for it to be banned.

Anyways, the use of the word "banned" isn't the issue, even if it might be a little too dramatic for some, like a mother concerned with racial epithets in Huckleberry Finn.

But "Unavailable at a specific school for an undetermined amount of time", as if these books magically disappeared, doesn't describe what happened. It's euphemistic. The school district pulled the books from the schools for reasons not unlike that of the Catholic Church's in their List of Prohibited books, or the Soviet or Nazi's campaigns of censorship—to restrict access to literature because of a fear of the results. It's censorship.

The banning of these specific books is especially egregious because they are classic reminders of human nature, and works of art.



posted on Dec, 6 2016 @ 09:57 PM
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a reply to: TheAlleghenyGentleman


Yes, I understand rap is taught in a few select schools, I recognize that. I said it is not however taught in most schools around the nation. There will always be alternative curriculums that defy the norms. That is not what the argument here is however. This argument is about what the average high schooler will be reading or not reading.

Who is more relevant - Twain or Tupac? Who decides that - for everyone? Based on what criteria?

From your earlier post:


Rap is not in the average high school curriculum and its lyrical significance is different to that of the written words of Twain.

Still wondering what you mean by lyrical significance. Especially if you're holding up Twain as being the superior choice

I do understand the difference between a book and a poem (we'll just say poem)

Since language is often a problem for people with both of these choices, how is it not important to this discussion?

edit on 12/6/2016 by Spiramirabilis because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 6 2016 @ 10:01 PM
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a reply to: LesMisanthrope



The question was: "Do you or do you not support the banning of books?" I want to know if you have a principle on this subject, or if this is a game of feelings and urges.

Feel free to decide that for yourself

Everything you need to know about where I stand I've already said. I'm not here to indulge your urges



posted on Dec, 6 2016 @ 10:04 PM
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a reply to: Spiramirabilis

We are not disscusing rap however. Of course rap is relevant in today's world but the argument is about what is being taught in the average US English class. Why can't you stay on topic? I would love to discuss rap and its history in another thread. I know a sh#t ton about it and its history. I grew up in Los Angeles and live in New York and feel I am surrounded by amazing beats. The lyrical significance of rap and what it has done to empower urban youth is revolutionary. But, that should be for another thread. Let's focus on the subject at hand.



Thanx.

edit on 6-12-2016 by TheAlleghenyGentleman because: Grammar


(post by everyone removed for a manners violation)

posted on Dec, 6 2016 @ 10:09 PM
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a reply to: Spiramirabilis

You seem none too concerned about the subject. More concerned about the words used to describe it. I know exactly where you stand.



posted on Dec, 6 2016 @ 10:17 PM
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a reply to: TheAlleghenyGentleman


We are not disscusing rap however.

What we're discussing is why would people even consider removing certain books from a school based on offensive language? Especially if it's art?

If the meaning and context are what's important - then why is music censored - for offensive language?

People censor music all the time for the exact same language issues. Why is it OK when Twain says it - but not somebody less classic? I can guarantee you plenty of people think of Tupac as a national treasure. Among others

I think it's funny that you don't see how it fits into this thread :-)

Suit yourself - if you're not up for it
edit on 12/6/2016 by Spiramirabilis because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 6 2016 @ 10:19 PM
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a reply to: LesMisanthrope



You seem none too concerned about the subject. More concerned about the words used to describe it. I know exactly where you stand.

You don't even know where you stand

But hey - thanks for playing

:-)



posted on Dec, 6 2016 @ 10:20 PM
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originally posted by: Spiramirabilis
a reply to: LesMisanthrope



You seem none too concerned about the subject. More concerned about the words used to describe it. I know exactly where you stand.

You don't even know where you stand

But hey - thanks for playing

:-)


Pleasure, as always.



posted on Dec, 6 2016 @ 10:24 PM
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a reply to: Spiramirabilis


You're misunderstanding me altogether. I agree that rap can be a great tool in the classroom. I have never said otherwise to you.

I don't see how you equate a comment that annee said to me however about rap on the radio and its censorship to that of reading literature in a high school setting. The two are not equal. One does not answer questions about Tupac on the sat but one will answer questions about classic lit. Please stay on topic. You are drifting sir.
edit on 6-12-2016 by TheAlleghenyGentleman because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 6 2016 @ 10:29 PM
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a reply to: TheAlleghenyGentleman


One does not answer questions about Tupac on the sat but one will answer questions about classic lit.

Yes - exactly


Please stay on topic. You are drifting sir.

We are on topic - but drifting too far outside of your box I'm guessing

And it's ma'am :-)

Too bad - this is the conversation we should all be having. But let's just talk about how much we love Twain's take on things instead

Outta here for tonight



posted on Dec, 6 2016 @ 10:41 PM
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a reply to: Spiramirabilis

I apologize for the sir, ma'am.

Do you believe Tupacs writing to be as revered as to that of twain in the year 2160?

I don't believe I ever remember twain inciting violence. These two things are not comparable. Violence should not be on the sat/act.

You just don't understand classic art and literature and that is fine. That is your right.

I also said I would discuss rap in another thread. I am rarely out of my comfort zone but I do like to stay focused.

Enjoy your evening ma'am.
edit on 6-12-2016 by TheAlleghenyGentleman because: (no reason given)



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