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Aviation trivia quiz.

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posted on Mar, 1 2016 @ 06:10 PM
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Just for fun (so no Googling) and to see if anyone other than Zaph knows everything there is to know about aeroplanes.

Back in the 50s and 60s,if a US Navy aircraft landed on the wrong aircraft carrier,what did they do to it?
edit on 1-3-2016 by Imagewerx because: (no reason given)




posted on Mar, 1 2016 @ 06:14 PM
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They tagged it with graffiti. Lol



posted on Mar, 1 2016 @ 06:30 PM
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a reply to: Imagewerx

roll it off



posted on Mar, 1 2016 @ 06:32 PM
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originally posted by: perpetrator76
They tagged it with graffiti. Lol


tagged it completely.....repeatedly......kept it civil......good soldiers



posted on Mar, 1 2016 @ 06:58 PM
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posted on Mar, 1 2016 @ 07:13 PM
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a reply to: Imagewerx

Poor F-4U.




posted on Mar, 1 2016 @ 07:19 PM
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I want to play!

Again without using Google, what's special about the KC-135D?



posted on Mar, 1 2016 @ 07:32 PM
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originally posted by: Zaphod58
I want to play!

Again without using Google, what's special about the KC-135D?


At first, I was thinking this was a non-stratotanker used for elint, etc. but I was wrong according to Wiki:



KC-135D All four RC-135As (Pacer Swan) were modified to partial KC-135A configuration in 1979.[42][43] The four aircraft (serial numbers 63-8058, 63-8059, 63-8060 and 63-8061) were given a unique designation KC-135D as they differed from the KC-135A in that they were built with a flight engineer's position on the flight deck.[44] The flight engineer's position was removed when the aircraft were modified to KC-135 standards but they retained their electrically powered wing flap secondary (emergency) drive mechanism and second air conditioning pack which had been used to cool the RC-135As on-board photo-mapping systems.[45] Later re-engined with Pratt & Whitney TF33 engines and a cockpit update to KC-135E standards in 1990 and are were retired to the 309th AMARG at Davis-Monthan AFB, AZ in 2007



posted on Mar, 1 2016 @ 07:37 PM
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a reply to: NightFlight

8055, 8056 and 8057 were EC-135s that began as B models. They were ours. From 8058 they went RC.
edit on 3/1/2016 by Zaphod58 because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 1 2016 @ 07:41 PM
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originally posted by: Zaphod58
I want to play!

Again without using Google, what's special about the KC-135D?


was that not the first refueling plane to be a jet?



posted on Mar, 1 2016 @ 07:47 PM
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a reply to: TerryDon79

That was the KC-135A.



posted on Mar, 1 2016 @ 07:48 PM
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originally posted by: Zaphod58
a reply to: TerryDon79

That was the KC-135A.


Well damn! I was only wrong with the letter lol



posted on Mar, 1 2016 @ 08:01 PM
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a reply to: TerryDon79

There were some interesting differences because of that letter. They looked identical externally, except the D model had a camera window low on the side.

Internally they had an extra position in the cockpit, electric flap motors, and extra cooling systems.



posted on Mar, 1 2016 @ 08:03 PM
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originally posted by: Zaphod58
a reply to: TerryDon79

There were some interesting differences because of that letter. They looked identical externally, except the D model had a camera window low on the side.

Internally they had an extra position in the cockpit, electric flap motors, and extra cooling systems.


I'm just reading up on it now.

They really are identical side by side, like you said.



posted on Mar, 1 2016 @ 08:06 PM
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a reply to: TerryDon79

Oh that gives me the next question.

What was the only way to tell a KC-135Q model.

No cheating and looking it up.



posted on Mar, 1 2016 @ 08:15 PM
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a reply to: Zaphod58

Specially segregated tanks allowing it to carry both JP-7 for the SR-71 (and others) and standard JP-8.
edit on 1-3-2016 by Northernhollow because: current jet fuel is JP-8, not JP-4



posted on Mar, 1 2016 @ 08:18 PM
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originally posted by: Northernhollow
a reply to: Zaphod58

Specially segregated tanks allowing it to carry both JP-7 for the SR-71 (and others) and standard JP-4.


I didn't think any KC-135 could fly fast enough to refuel an SR-71. Unless I'm mistaken?

(I don't know what the answer is btw lol)



posted on Mar, 1 2016 @ 08:23 PM
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a reply to: Northernhollow

There is an external difference.



posted on Mar, 1 2016 @ 08:24 PM
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How much did the pilots of the American Volunteer Group, also know as The Flying Tigers, get paid for each Japanese plane shot down?

or

What model of fighter did the Flying Tigers fly?
edit on 1-3-2016 by Semicollegiate because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 1 2016 @ 08:24 PM
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a reply to: TerryDon79

They refueled subsonic.



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