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Aviation trivia quiz.

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posted on Mar, 1 2016 @ 09:37 PM
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a reply to: CovertAgenda

That is a rather pretty little airplane. Never seen it before...which should come as no surprise to anyone. Thanks!




posted on Mar, 1 2016 @ 09:39 PM
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originally posted by: Zaphod58
a reply to: Semicollegiate

The fighter portion of the unit flew P-40Bs. There was a ground attack unit as well that flew A-20 and A-28 bombers. All were originally destined for Britain. Interestingly the unit was only in combat for about 8 months.


When the Flying Tigers started there was still an isolationist attitude in the US. The War Department assimilated the Flying Tigers after the US entry into the war.

The AVG morphed into the Fourteenth Air Force. By the end of the war the 14th was bombing Japan with B-29s from Kumming.

American fighter tactics in the early war are inspirational. The Japanese fighter, the Zero, was made to dogfight. Our planes were slower in maneuver, so the P-40s power dove through enemy formations, and the Wildcats paired up in a scissors over watch.



posted on Mar, 1 2016 @ 09:45 PM
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a reply to: Zaphod58
My blunder !!!... although I took your 'parked' hint as a 'refueling on the ground' hint... a refueling setup in each wheel-well.. left for standard, right for super (jp7) wasn't it? (hence the 'obvious' remark..lol)

I would have thought you would have a bd5 tucked away in your garage zaph...



posted on Mar, 1 2016 @ 09:49 PM
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a reply to: CovertAgenda

I think that's how it was set up. It's been awhile. It was always weird to see a -135 with a dual SPR setup.

Personally I'm saving for a ViperJet.



posted on Mar, 1 2016 @ 10:01 PM
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a reply to: Zaphod58
Viperjet...now that is pretty, bit like a young spunky version of a macchi mb399 (strangely enough they use a RR viper - jet )
I was always preying/saving/dreaming for a bd-10..... but that all went pear-shaped..... like those jet/rocket backpacks we were tempted with in the 70's...



posted on Mar, 1 2016 @ 10:23 PM
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originally posted by: Zaphod58
a reply to: CovertAgenda

I think that's how it was set up. It's been awhile. It was always weird to see a -135 with a dual SPR setup.

Personally I'm saving for a ViperJet.


Viperjet looks like the T-38/F-5/F-20.

The F-5 Freedom Fighter was made for easiest ground crew maintenance access panels, taking off from dirt runways, and still supersonic.



posted on Mar, 1 2016 @ 11:12 PM
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originally posted by: seagull
a reply to: NightFlight

Prettiest?

Spitfire.


It deserves mention, to be sure. Beyond the ordinarily heard names, I nominate the Bugatti 100.



posted on Mar, 1 2016 @ 11:53 PM
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a reply to: RadioRobert

Certainly up there!.... I remember reading about this in a Air&Space mag... what a beast, a beautiful one though!
Can only imagine it with the originally intended straight8 supercharged motors... 'jet assisted'...(well Meredith effect), contra-props, analogue flight computer, etc, etc... Would have had to have huge balls to fly that one.... (or maybe little ones because of the driveshafts...lol)
Thanks for reminding me of her!



posted on Mar, 2 2016 @ 01:55 AM
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a reply to: RadioRobert

Now that one I've seen. Only pictures. It's pretty, but not quite to the standard of the Spit. Eye of the beholder.



posted on Mar, 2 2016 @ 09:33 AM
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Darn, came in late for the Flying Tiger question....

-How about highest scoring aces of WWII and the Great War ??



posted on Mar, 2 2016 @ 11:50 AM
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a reply to: Semicollegiate

If I were to win the lottery, I'd spring for an easy to manage 1950s era fighter, like a Hawker Hunter or a Saab Draken, with a T-38 being up there as well.

As to the prettiest thing that's ever flown I break my choices down to categories:

Pre-war civil: De Havilland DH.88
Pre-war military: Hawker Hart
Pre-war commercial: Boeing 307 Stratoliner

Post-war civil: Cessna 190/195 or maybe the 170
Post-war military: Hawker Hunter, Saab Draken, or maybe the Handley-Page Victor
Post-war civil: Concorde, or pretty much any British Jet airliner, with the 707 and 727 as runners up, and the 787 as one that may yet be among the greats (and MOM as the one that could well crown it all if it keeps the 757's proportions)



posted on Mar, 2 2016 @ 12:00 PM
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a reply to: Barnalby

If I won the lottery I'd buy the Tornado testbed that was up for sale.



posted on Mar, 2 2016 @ 12:12 PM
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a reply to: Zaphod58

Oh yes, and it was an ADV, too.

Speaking of tempermental European steel, I wonder what that guy in South Africa would want for his lightnings...



posted on Mar, 2 2016 @ 12:18 PM
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Softball question.

What's the difference between the E-6A TACAMO and E-6B Mercury?



posted on Mar, 2 2016 @ 02:31 PM
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originally posted by: Zaphod58
a reply to: CovertAgenda

The only really obvious difference that could be seen from a distance was one single antenna forward of the pilot director lighting under the fuselage.


(where did that quote come from?)

The E-6B has a 737 cockpit?
edit on 2-3-2016 by NightFlight because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 2 2016 @ 04:14 PM
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originally posted by: manuelram16
Darn, came in late for the Flying Tiger question....

-How about highest scoring aces of WWII and the Great War ??


The German Erich (?) Hartman had 358 in WWII. Mostly on the Eastern Front.

Manfred von Richtoffen, The Red Baron, 80.

Have you heard how to change the ammo drum on the Lewis gun mounted above the top wing of an SE-5A?

or Which plane was outlawed in the Versailles Treaty?


edit on 2-3-2016 by Semicollegiate because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 2 2016 @ 04:21 PM
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a reply to: Semicollegiate

Chennault grounded and fined any pilot that got into a turning fight and survived.



posted on Mar, 2 2016 @ 04:24 PM
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originally posted by: Barnalby
a reply to: Semicollegiate

If I were to win the lottery, I'd spring for an easy to manage 1950s era fighter, like a Hawker Hunter or a Saab Draken, with a T-38 being up there as well.

As to the prettiest thing that's ever flown I break my choices down to categories:

Pre-war civil: De Havilland DH.88
Pre-war military: Hawker Hart
Pre-war commercial: Boeing 307 Stratoliner

Post-war civil: Cessna 190/195 or maybe the 170
Post-war military: Hawker Hunter, Saab Draken, or maybe the Handley-Page Victor
Post-war civil: Concorde, or pretty much any British Jet airliner, with the 707 and 727 as runners up, and the 787 as one that may yet be among the greats (and MOM as the one that could well crown it all if it keeps the 757's proportions)


I'm partial to the wide thin ones.

The P-38 and the F15.

The A 26 was very well proportioned. I saw and heard one about 50 feet overhead crossing Donner Summit. It sounded like a herd of dragsters.

The Concorde was pretty. I got to see it land in 1988.

I do like the looks of the F-5. I don't know if it can fly on one engine.

I would prefer two engines if I were to own and fly my plane a lot.
edit on 2-3-2016 by Semicollegiate because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 2 2016 @ 04:26 PM
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a reply to: Semicollegiate

Was it to stand up in the cockpit holding the control column with your knees?

And the Fokker DVII?

What was the only US built aeroplane to see combat in WW1?



posted on Mar, 2 2016 @ 04:28 PM
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Was the A-10 also made as a two seater?

What was it called?



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