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Anyone have experience with 3 legged dog?

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posted on Sep, 15 2015 @ 01:35 PM
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My dog Brandy (medium sized shepherd mix) has a tumor on her left front leg and though we are still waiting for final tests, it is likely that we will only have two choices:

Amputate the entire leg up to the shoulder or put her down...

I know it's an off chance - but I thought I would ask if any ATS members have ever dealt with owning a dog with only three legs or has ever known anyone who did?

I just wanted to try and get advice on what the dog's quality of life would be - and whether there's any particular difficulties to be faced as owner in that regard..

Brandy is a rescue dog - we've only had her three years and, she was only 2 when we got her, so she's fairly young -

This is so hard...

I mean, I was never really a dog 'person', and we got her for my daughter, but since I was home with Brandy more often (and I think being the 'mom' of the 'family') she has bonded more with me - and I have managed to fall in love with the doggoned dog...



edit on 15-9-2015 by lostgirl because: spelling




posted on Sep, 15 2015 @ 01:39 PM
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Yes, a family member has one.

After a short adjustment time, their girl has a great quality of life. (She got hit by a car.)
She still falls once in a while, but that is mostly when she is so excited to see you. She eats, potties, everything else just fine.
If the doctor doesn't think anything has spread, I would certainly go with that option. They can still have a great, happy, loving life.

I really hope it all works out for you!



posted on Sep, 15 2015 @ 01:46 PM
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Dear Doggie Abby,

My Master has a bad leg. The only option is amputate or put her down.

Dear Bad Wheel in Boulder.

It might be a little hassle at first. But, your Master will adapt.

So, let's try to fix her...Although, a Master that actually loved you.

Would never even ask that question.



posted on Sep, 15 2015 @ 01:46 PM
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a reply to: lostgirl

A dog can maneuver on three legs, but, you need to think of the cancer and the pain. If you don't have a deep attachment to this dog, it might be best for all to put it down. But that's something you need to decide.

Funny story, my father in law was big into coon hunting. He raised Plot hounds and hunted them often. Towards the end of his life, he was a bit more grumpy than he had been and wasn't the type to take advice. He purchased a "trainer" dog for his puppies. The dog has won many awards in her day, but.......she had deteriorated a bit. My wife drove him from NC to Kentucky to purchase the dog. She was $500. She has three legs and one eye. My wife laughed and told him to get in the car, they weren't buying this dog. He (being the stubborn know it all) bought the dog anyway. She lived about two more weeks, then died a quiet comfortable death. I doubt he learned anything, but I laugh and think of him walking around heaven with the limping dog following him. Oh, and he lost his glasses on the trip as well. Which just made the story funnier to us.

Good luck with your dog.



posted on Sep, 15 2015 @ 02:06 PM
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a reply to: lostgirl

I'm so sorry! Yet, there's hopeful news. I had a friend of mine that had a full blood German Sheppard that had the same issue, it was in her hind leg though. I'm not sure where the went to get the procedure done but the ended up getting her a "makeshift" prosthetic leg, which actually worked out really well for the pup. I'm not sure on costs and all of that but I'll do my best to find out for you!

Keep your head up.



posted on Sep, 15 2015 @ 02:22 PM
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My folks had a dog who had a misadventure with an old boxsprings. He got tangled in the wire springs after chewing into the thing and the wire basically got wrapped around his leg and strangled the circulation for long enough that in the end, it couldn't be saved.

Once he got over the trauma, he adjusted just fine. He lost some of his range of motion, and by that I mean he never climbed ladders or went down playground slides like he used to, but he otherwise still swam and went walking everywhere with my dad and was a great all around pet for another ten or so years. Eventually, the arthritis will become an issue as the motion is a bit unbalanced, but you can work with your vet on that one.



posted on Sep, 15 2015 @ 02:32 PM
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My dog died this past fall at the age of 12.5 years. She lost a front leg at the age of one. Please send me a message and I will talk with you about it.
a reply to: lostgirl




posted on Sep, 15 2015 @ 02:54 PM
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I have friend human who had his leg amputated at the knee. One day he was going for an adventure in the bush and he met a lost dog that had three legs, they became partners in crime and best friends for a long long time until boyzee the dog passed a while ago. A true love story. Dogs can do three legs easy some dogs even do two legs.



posted on Sep, 15 2015 @ 03:09 PM
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originally posted by: whyamIhere
Dear Doggie Abby,

My Master has a bad leg. The only option is amputate or put her down.

Dear Bad Wheel in Boulder.

It might be a little hassle at first. But, your Master will adapt.

So, let's try to fix her...Although, a Master that actually loved you.

Would never even ask that question.


You know what?

I have suffered from Major Treatment-resistant Depression for as long as I can remember, Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, and now at 51 yrs old, severe arthritis in my spine -

- so when I say my primary concern is the "quality" of my dog's life, you better believe I know a thing or two about 'quality versus quantity' when it comes to being 'alive'...

...As well, because of my ill health, my husband carries far more than his fair share of the care taking of the household -- in addition to working long hours -

- so believe me when I say that the reason I "even" asked the question is to find out whether we are talking "a little hassle" (and do you know personally how "little" effort might be involved?), or whether the situation would be adding severely to my husband's burdens...

You know, just before starting this thread, I had finally stopped crying - now I'm started back up again, just in time for my little girl to come home from school...

Congratulations sir, you win the award for most cruel ATS member I've ever encountered!



posted on Sep, 15 2015 @ 03:18 PM
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a reply to: lostgirl

Don't worry.

It is nothing like a chronic, ongoing condition. The big worry would be whether or not the cancer had spread and how likely that is. That's the more pressing issue. Dogs and cats get over having a limb amputated just fine, but if the cancer is one that will or has spread, then you can amputate but it won't cure the issue.



posted on Sep, 15 2015 @ 03:47 PM
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a reply to: lostgirl

First, PLEASE don't be put off by people saying mean things. I don't know why some people feel the need to do that, but it's not a reflection on you...

I'm so sorry about your dog. I agree with the others that dogs with three legs do FINE. If the cancer hasn't spread, that's exactly what I would do.

We lost a dog to osteosarcoma (bone cancer) in the roof of her mouth. We would have had to remove her muzzle and most of her face to save her. And the recurrence likelihood is about 80% in 4 months. So, we put her down when she stopped being able to eat. It was rough.

But I've known of a lot of dogs who survived losing a leg and went on to live full, happy, active lives.

Hang in there. And let us know what happens...



posted on Sep, 15 2015 @ 03:52 PM
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a reply to: lostgirl

As some members know I used to run a kennel and train dogs at an animal shelter. I met about a dozen 3 legged friends while I was there. Several were like that when they got there but a few had to have amputations after arriving for various reasons.

I hate to use this word but, you're rather "lucky" it's on the front leg. They seem to have an easier time adjusting to front legs than the hind legs, mostly because there's much less weight on it.

After about a week or two most of them were running, playing with other dogs, playing fetch, you name it. Hell, Raymond who still lives there, with his 3 legged wife (yes wife, a volunteer had a JP come in and marry them) still lifts one leg to pee! He also lost his front left leg.

It's astonishing how quickly they overcome such a seemingly giant change.
That's not to say she won't have trouble at first. But she must definitely will adjust.

When I had them I would start with just real short walks around the property. Stopping as often as I felt they needed. There was 2 that needed a little help. For this I got a really nice mesh webbed harness that covered most of the body. One with chest support is ideal so you can hold them up a little easier while they walk.
But after a day or two they would start to understand what happened and how to deal with it.
Like I said, within a couple weeks they were moving much better, faster, even running.

It can be tough to see something so beloved go through something like that. But I would absolutely not euthanize my own dog because of it.

I wish you the best of luck. If you have any more questions I'd be happy to help in any way that I can.

ETA: something like this.

edit on 9 15 2015 by MDpvc because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 15 2015 @ 04:00 PM
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We had a dog that was shot and lost her front right leg and a couple toes on a back leg. She lived a long life after, but did gain weight. But she wasn't so over weight that it hampered her mobility. She was a beauty and lived a full life. No prosthesis, just my "tripod" .



posted on Sep, 15 2015 @ 04:22 PM
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I've had a dog who was found by a vet as a two months old pup on the side of the road in Romania with 4 broken legs and one being infested with maggots, the one being amputated, the leg and her entire left shoulder. The remaining legs all had visible scars from the fractures ever since. The vet used her as a guard dog but when she, at 2 years old, was adopted by us, she was emaciated and could hardly walk 100m because she had no muscle and her bones were sticking out and her fur was really hard and bristly.

Proper food, rich in proteins, and gradual increase in exercise made her a pretty and happy dog again, though
Her quality of life was great actually, and she was very active and mobile. Sometimes a bit more insecure on strange surfaces/floors, but small things like that are to be expected. Her right shoulder got very strong and muscly and she could actually go on pretty long walks. All in all, it's not a disaster. The dog will most likely adjust, my dog came from a far worse place (although she did grow up having only 3 legs) and I suspect yours will end up fine
Good luck!
edit on 15-9-2015 by Pitou because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 15 2015 @ 04:56 PM
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There was a three legged dog at one of my local pubs. The Fighting Cocks at Godshill, if you are interested. It was mad with energy.

This is a disability dogs seem to be able to cope with quite well. For the record, it was her front left leg. I think dogs with a rear leg missing may be less mobile, but cannot see why they would not compensate and lead happy lives.



posted on Sep, 15 2015 @ 05:09 PM
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Although ALL dogs go to Heaven it doesn't have to be too soon...

thebark.com...

www.quickanddirtytips.com...

www.youtube.com...

Just remember when You call Her, it might take a tad longer to get there...

namaste



posted on Sep, 15 2015 @ 06:12 PM
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Hey, thanks for the message, but I'm not allowed to use that function.
So long story short. What kind of shephard? Australian shephard has life expectancy of 12 years and is medium size. German shephard has life expectancy of 10 years and is large size. Also German Sheaphards have hip problems as they get older. The key to a happy three legged dog is keeping the dog thin with lots of excercise.
Thin means less wear and tear on the joints, especially when you are talking about front legs which are not as strong as rear legs. My dog lost front leg at age one, so the remaining front became very strong because she was still developing. The chest muscle on that "good" side was very muscular and developed and the shoulder and upper leg as well. Half chow/half collie, and caught groundhogs, squirrels, coons, and possum into her 9th year. She chased after that, but got too slow. She developed arthritis around then. Cosoquine helped, but she slowed. Your dog will be 6 when healed, so late middle aged. Imagine a 55-65 year old person. It will be much harder for this dog to adapt muscularly, although it can do it. A big question is what type of shephard. If this dog develops hip problems with one front, the dog will be miserable. It's a tough decision. If you get it removed, remember, keep the dog thin, meaning ZERO scraps, less food than normal and real bones from pork and beef. And Running for at least an hour a day. Two 30 minute sessions, or 3 20 minute sessions, or long hikes where the dog can run off and come back.
So sorry, I wish you both peace.
reply to: lostgirl


edit on 15-9-2015 by KEACHI because: Auto correct weirdness



posted on Sep, 15 2015 @ 06:46 PM
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a reply to: lostgirl

I guess I didn't understand. Your OP seemed cold to me.

I apologize for misunderstanding what you wrote.



posted on Sep, 15 2015 @ 08:28 PM
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Ever watched the tv show Parks and Recreation?

Champion!

He is a super dog, I'm sure yours will be too.



posted on Sep, 15 2015 @ 09:42 PM
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a reply to: MDpvc

Thank you so much for making such a detailed reply and including the photo of the harness! It's very encouraging to get information from someone with experience of multiple dogs with such handicaps...

And knowing about the 'luck' of front leg versus back leg amputation is actually helpful in easing my mind that it won't be so hard on her as it could be.




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