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Possible MH-370 debris found on Reunion Island?

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posted on Aug, 3 2015 @ 09:18 AM
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a reply to: Shamrock6




Kind of like how your local mechanic doesn't keep spare parts for every last make and model of every car ever built in the event that a 1993 Chevy Impala happens to roll in the garage on any given day.


Do airline companies own as much different models of planes as there are different brands and models of cars still in use?

Malaysia Airlines has 4 different types of planes of which 13 are 777's. A flap is bound to need replacing, it seems to me. But again, I am no expert and I am not going to argue about it further.


edit on 3-8-2015 by YouPeople because: (no reason given)




posted on Aug, 3 2015 @ 09:20 AM
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a reply to: YouPeople

In almost 30 years running around on a military ramp, I can count the number of times I heard of a flap being changed on one hand. We never changed one on any of our jets.



posted on Aug, 3 2015 @ 09:23 AM
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a reply to: Zaphod58

Aren't the parts that actually move it situated in the wing of the plane?



posted on Aug, 3 2015 @ 09:25 AM
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a reply to: Zaphod58

We are talking about commercial jumbo jets now. Didn't you mention earlier that they do need replacing now and then?



posted on Aug, 3 2015 @ 09:34 AM
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a reply to: Zaphod58

I seen stills & video of the burning wreckage from that 777 brought down in Ukraine
assuming that the tail wing flaps were unrecognizable is an error in thought, actual, physical proof is needed

as for a hanger for gutting out the MH370 seats, etc... that issue is not unanswerable,,,, a large grass colored tarp over a 40' deep soccer field sized rectangular excavation would hide a 777...
(a 777 sat on the tarmac at the Phoenix airport for 4 months of summer heat stress tests, it flew in from winter cold tests in Alaska before coming to Sky Harbor... the only thing oversized were the engines themselves imho)

nothing compelling in your derail my theory plot yet, kind sir.



posted on Aug, 3 2015 @ 09:37 AM
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a reply to: YouPeople

They're mounted in housings on the flaperon.

mobile.twitter.com...



posted on Aug, 3 2015 @ 09:37 AM
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a reply to: Zaphod58




Boeing can have a new flaperon out in a day or two if they need to.


So they are in fact pretty easy to come by, if you have the right connections.
edit on 3-8-2015 by YouPeople because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 3 2015 @ 09:38 AM
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a reply to: YouPeople

Each piece on each 777 has an id specific to that 777. There is more than "one piece" in the flapperon. They will likely find an ID and it will confirm whether or not MH370.



posted on Aug, 3 2015 @ 09:39 AM
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a reply to: YouPeople

I said they rarely need replacing. They're usually only replaced after they're damaged, such as something hitting them.



posted on Aug, 3 2015 @ 09:42 AM
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a reply to: Zaphod58

Exactly. so the flaperon is nothing more than a 7ft piece of aliminium alloy and composite that is merely attached to the system in the wing that moves it.

You were saying it was so expensive because of hydraulics and actuators in and on it.

Seems like you made a little error there.

Why does it cost millions of dollars again?
edit on 3-8-2015 by YouPeople because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 3 2015 @ 09:45 AM
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a reply to: St Udio

And no one on the island noticed the 777 sitting there, or that's still sitting there? None of the satellite photography people noticed the odd discolored area that suddenly appeared on the island about the time that MH370 vanished?

And it would have to be a huge tarp. A 777-200ER is 209 feet long, 61 feet high, with a 200 foot wingspan.



posted on Aug, 3 2015 @ 09:47 AM
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a reply to: YouPeople

No I didn't. The actuator is in the flaperon, with hydraulic lines running to it. That and the cost of the composites used in manufacturing put the cost of one upwards of a million dollars.



posted on Aug, 3 2015 @ 09:52 AM
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originally posted by: Zaphod58
a reply to: YouPeople

They're mounted in housings on the flaperon.

mobile.twitter.com...


This was my question,



Aren't the parts that actually move it situated in the wing of the plane?


Did you formulate your answer that way on purpose?

The proper formulation would have been,

"Yes, they are, the flaperon is mounted to them by the housings on it."



posted on Aug, 3 2015 @ 09:56 AM
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a reply to: Zaphod58




The actuator is in the flaperon, with hydraulic lines running to it.


Can you prove this with a schematic drawing perhaps, you know where to look.



posted on Aug, 3 2015 @ 09:57 AM
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dp
edit on 3-8-2015 by zazzafrazz because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 3 2015 @ 09:57 AM
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a reply to: YouPeople

Baaah stop nitpicking over nothing. His cost estimation is likely close, I can't be sure of the exact figure, but I have worked for commercial airlines and I'd say he is close. The wing of a 777 and the Flapperon is unique to 777's, there are not millions made to bring the price down, a $349 million price tag doesn't include seating or internal design features......



posted on Aug, 3 2015 @ 09:59 AM
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a reply to: YouPeople

The actuator is on the flaperon, not the wing. The housings I was talking about are on the flaperon, not the wing.



posted on Aug, 3 2015 @ 10:00 AM
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off-topic post removed to prevent thread-drift


 



posted on Aug, 3 2015 @ 10:03 AM
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off-topic post removed to prevent thread-drift


 



posted on Aug, 3 2015 @ 10:04 AM
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a reply to: Zaphod58

The parts that are powered and make the flaperon move are not situated in the wing and extended to the flaperon?




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