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Airbus A320 crash in Southern France

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posted on Mar, 24 2015 @ 04:15 PM
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originally posted by: jazz10
Magnetic anomaly perhaps?
Tide of the century was only a fee days ago? Following the eclipse.
Maybe that could be an explaination as to why the sudden decent, maybe like I said before the onboard instruments were effected.
Just asking........or am I not allowed again?

Or let me guess are we to rule everything out apart from blaming pilots or terrorism again?


What you're saying is ruled out because it's completely unscientific and isn't possible, no other reason.




posted on Mar, 24 2015 @ 04:17 PM
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Stated here in Spain that the "guardia civil" The Spanish paramilitary police force, are reviewing the security videos of the boarding of the flight.

Maybe just routine, maybe they're could be a problem.



posted on Mar, 24 2015 @ 04:19 PM
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originally posted by: Zaphod58
a reply to: RP2SticksOfDynamite

Decompression. Frozen AoA sensors. Frozen pitot tubes.

There are three mechanical reasons for it.


Why no contact from the cockpit? Because they either did not want or could not. HA decompression could render all unconcious.



posted on Mar, 24 2015 @ 04:19 PM
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a reply to: jazz10

Just can't believe magnetic anomalies would be that narrowly focused.

Big question is what would be going on that experienced pilots would not have time to declare an emergency? Even if a mechanical failure, experienced pilots working a checklist in a controlled descent with positive radar contact would contact ATC. They were descending on an airway and need clearance to descend to lower altitude.

Hopefully the voice cockpit recorder (if found) will shed some light on this.



posted on Mar, 24 2015 @ 04:20 PM
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originally posted by: ashpack

originally posted by: starviego

Another military shoot down?


www.dailymail.co.uk... ldorf-francois-hollande-Lufthansa-4U9525.html#ixzz3VKSG0nLO
Pierre Polizzi, the owner of a nearby camping site told Al Jazeera:
'There was loud noise and then suddenly nothing. At first I thought it came from fighter jets that often hold drills in the area.' ...
One eyewitness in the village of Le Vernet, where some wreckage has been sighted, told Le Parisien newspaper: 'This morning I heard a massive thud and soon after saw several jets fly over.





I received a Squawk 7700 from Italian Airforce jet MM7168 at 10:53GMT on flight radar but have seen other stay the squawk was at 10:35GMT. I did not look on the map at the time but twitter suggested the jet was in the area. There's probably nothing to it but you never know....

Im not suggesting it shot it down but a jet/plane could of hit the tail


Yes I get FR24 notifications too. And it was apparently a peach aviation flight on the other side of Italy hundreds of miles away. Nowhere near.

mobile.twitter.com...



posted on Mar, 24 2015 @ 04:21 PM
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a reply to: ScientificRailgun

I thought you were being needlessly irrelevant with your Bush comment.



posted on Mar, 24 2015 @ 04:22 PM
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a reply to: RP2SticksOfDynamite

Rules #1-50 of an emergency are fly the damn airplane. There isn't a damn thing anyone on the ground can do to help, so you fly the airplane FIRST and THEN when you have things mostly under control worry about telling someone.

Yeah, you mean like decompressing the aircraft didn't render everyone but one flight attendant unconscious on the Helios 737 that crashed near Athens.



posted on Mar, 24 2015 @ 04:28 PM
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a reply to: Zaphod58

Well, you'd have to think in a controlled (from all appearances) descent, that the co-pilot would have contacted someone. True, fly the airplane, but work the checklist. They are trained to do exactly this.

8 minutes is plenty of time to notify ATC, even if you aren't going to make it.



posted on Mar, 24 2015 @ 04:29 PM
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originally posted by: Zaphod58
a reply to: RP2SticksOfDynamite

Rules #1-50 of an emergency are fly the damn airplane. There isn't a damn thing anyone on the ground can do to help, so you fly the airplane FIRST and THEN when you have things mostly under control worry about telling someone.

Yeah, you mean like decompressing the aircraft didn't render everyone but one flight attendant unconscious on the Helios 737 that crashed near Athens.
But surely someone would have may day within the 8 minutes? It takes a few seconds to my day?



posted on Mar, 24 2015 @ 04:38 PM
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a reply to: RP2SticksOfDynamite

Without knowing what the problem was there's no way to say. If it was a frozen AoA sensor, it would have taken time to recognize what was going on, and figure out what was going on and come up with a plan to solve it.

If one pilot got up to work the breaker panel the other pilot would be more worried about talking to him and flying the plane, not working the radio.



posted on Mar, 24 2015 @ 04:40 PM
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originally posted by: ashpack
I received a Squawk 7700 from Italian Airforce jet MM7168 at 10:53GMT on flight radar but have seen other stay the squawk was at 10:35GMT. I did not look on the map at the time but twitter suggested the jet was in the area. There's probably nothing to it but you never know....
Im not suggesting it shot it down but a jet/plane could of hit the tail


You are a pilot and were flying in the area at the time? What's a 'Squawk 7700'?



posted on Mar, 24 2015 @ 04:40 PM
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a reply to: Freenrgy2
ermmmmmm
Iridium Satcom...
If communications are essentially stopped by interference. ...then that would explain it.

How mamy of the recent aircraft use the same?


The FCC and LightSquared have each made public commitments to solve the GPS interference issue before the network is allowed to operate.[132][133] However, according to Chris Dancy of the Aircraft Owners and Pilots Association, airline pilots with the type of systems that would be affected "may go off course and not even realize it."[134] The problems could also affect the Federal Aviation Administration upgrade to the air traffic control system, United States Defense Department guidance, and local emergency services including 911.[134]

On February 14, 2012, the U.S. Federal Communications Commission (FCC) moved to bar LightSquared's planned national broadband network after being informed by the National Telecommunications and Information Administration (NTIA), the federal agency that coordinates spectrum uses for the military and other federal government entities, that "there is no practical way to mitigate potential interference at this time".[135][136] LightSquared is challenging the FCC's action.



posted on Mar, 24 2015 @ 04:44 PM
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originally posted by: starviego
You are a pilot and were flying in the area at the time? What's a 'Squawk 7700'?


There are three squawk codes that every pilot should know:
    7500 Hijack
    7600 Radio Failure
    7700 Emergency

One of the Naval Aviators I met once said you can remember them by, ""Hi, Jack. Can't talk right now, I'm on fire!"




edit on 24-3-2015 by AugustusMasonicus because: networkdude has no beer



posted on Mar, 24 2015 @ 04:45 PM
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a reply to: starviego

7700 is the transponder code for an emergency. Pilots input it into the transponder and it sends an alert to ATC.



posted on Mar, 24 2015 @ 04:46 PM
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a reply to: starviego

The code 7700 is dedicated for an emergency. They set the transponder to 7700 and the controller knows they have an emergency without them having to radio.



posted on Mar, 24 2015 @ 04:54 PM
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I don't think it's possible. Not yet at least. I'm sticking with Zaphod's knowledge on the matter for now.

But I'll leave this about the communication system. The article goes 3 ways.
1. Hacking personal devices through the entertainment/wifi system.
2. Disrupting satcom
3. Worse case scenario..gaining access to actuators and changing the flight control surfaces .

www.foxnews.com...



This was in reply on page 10 ( ZEV93 ) about remotely hijacking a plane do to the Fly By Wire system.
edit on 24-3-2015 by Bigburgh because: (no reason given)

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edit on 24-3-2015 by Bigburgh because: tech glitch. had to refresh 5 times



posted on Mar, 24 2015 @ 05:05 PM
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The hacking thing is interesting coupled with the Satellite issues...



posted on Mar, 24 2015 @ 06:53 PM
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Anyone remember if it was an airbus that flew into the mountian / mountain side somewhere in asia half a year year ago ?
A test flight if i recall correctly



posted on Mar, 24 2015 @ 06:58 PM
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Aviate, Navigate and Communicate

1. No change in descent rate. Airspeed increased and they hit the mountain at nearly full speed.
2. No attempted change in course.
3. No distress call, nor transponder code for emergency.

Probable conclusion: Flight crew was incapacitated from performing their duties.

Question: Would rapid depressurization (autopilot engaged) cause the airliner to start a descent?



posted on Mar, 24 2015 @ 07:01 PM
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originally posted by: Zaphod58
The aircraft was MSN147, D-AIPX. It had completed 46,700 flights. No maintenance schedule has been released yet.


Report was it had a D check yesterday.







 
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