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What Colorado "looks like" after one year of "legal pot"

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+23 more 
posted on Jan, 19 2015 @ 08:17 PM
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www.cbc.ca...
Hit the wrong button too soon so here a link to the article on CBC......
edit on 19-1-2015 by stirling because: (no reason given)




As more tourists are drawn to experience the city's marijuana culture, thousands of jobs have been created, including a cannabis critic for the local paper.

Police officers were worried when Amendment 64 first passed, a Denver police officer tells Sherren, but that fear turned out to be unfounded.

"We found there hasn't been much of a change of anything," he said. "Basically, officers aren't seeing much of a change in how they do police work."

Looks much like a win win for Colorado......


edit on 19-1-2015 by stirling because: (no reason given)



+3 more 
posted on Jan, 19 2015 @ 08:22 PM
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Chances are that any societal impact won't be known for a while, give it 10 years, then 20 and see how it affects the emerging generations and their kids, they should be doing a lot of research on it, valuable information stats.
edit on 19-1-2015 by theabsolutetruth because: (no reason given)


+11 more 
posted on Jan, 19 2015 @ 08:22 PM
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a reply to: stirling



Sanity 1, Fear 0.

Ok, so what's next on our list???


+21 more 
posted on Jan, 19 2015 @ 08:34 PM
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a reply to: mOjOm


Ok, so what's next on our list???


The rest of the drug war.

And prostitution.


+9 more 
posted on Jan, 19 2015 @ 08:37 PM
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I'm so happy it's turned out to be a complete success and almost non-event and that not even one sensationalist band of poo chucking anti-pot media nazis have been able to find much to pick holes in it with.

I hope to hell the Colorado state government makes an absolute fortune in taxes off it which will expedite legalization in other states.

it's a very, very good thing. I for one am very pleased about the way it has gone, I have for many years advocated the legalization of Cannabis.

I hear that neighboring states have been trying to bring action against Colorado for, and get this, supplying it's residents with illegal drugs and yes, of course, creating a drug problem.

That would be funny if it wasn't just so bloody rage inducing.



posted on Jan, 19 2015 @ 08:37 PM
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Can anyone set-up shop or do you have to pay for a license to sell it? If they need a license, I wonder how they decide who will be awarded one? You probably need to have friends in high places to get one.



posted on Jan, 19 2015 @ 08:38 PM
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TOLD YA SO!




posted on Jan, 19 2015 @ 08:41 PM
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One interesting thing I saw somewhere, can't remember at the moment,

What were we just talking about?


Oh yeah, a whole new nich was opened up in the security sector due to the new law. As so much cash is being infused into the places that grow, and sell it, ex special forces people are being employed as curriers to ferry the money to the bank.

Man, I wish I was bringing down that kinda dough. C'mon Ohio do it allready!!!


+7 more 
posted on Jan, 19 2015 @ 08:41 PM
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originally posted by: LewsTherinThelamon
a reply to: mOjOm


Ok, so what's next on our list???


The rest of the drug war.

And prostitution.


Allow me to be the first to say "no." This is exactly the last thing anyone who supports decriminalization of MJ should be advocating at this time. One of the most listened to, most impactful arguments supporting the new decriminalization laws focused on weed's impact on health and society and the rational argument that the health impact was less than that of tobacco while the societal impacts were less than those of alcohol. Those arguments CANNOT be rationally made about hard drugs or prostitution.

If you want to force the majority of non-pot users who support the push for decriminalization to do an about face and demand a full return to prohibition, raising the "OK, now we need to legalize all vices" argument is a great first step. There is logic behind the legal banning of some substances and some activities... as the manufacture, use, and practice of these does not constitute "victimless" activity.




posted on Jan, 19 2015 @ 08:47 PM
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originally posted by: LewsTherinThelamon
a reply to: mOjOm


Ok, so what's next on our list???


The rest of the drug war.

And prostitution.


Just so.

And their day will come!


+12 more 
posted on Jan, 19 2015 @ 08:53 PM
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originally posted by: burdman30ott6

originally posted by: LewsTherinThelamon
a reply to: mOjOm


Ok, so what's next on our list???


The rest of the drug war.

And prostitution.


Allow me to be the first to say "no." This is exactly the last thing anyone who supports decriminalization of MJ should be advocating at this time. One of the most listened to, most impactful arguments supporting the new decriminalization laws focused on weed's impact on health and society and the rational argument that the health impact was less than that of tobacco while the societal impacts were less than those of alcohol. Those arguments CANNOT be rationally made about hard drugs or prostitution.

If you want to force the majority of non-pot users who support the push for decriminalization to do an about face and demand a full return to prohibition, raising the "OK, now we need to legalize all vices" argument is a great first step. There is logic behind the legal banning of some substances and some activities... as the manufacture, use, and practice of these does not constitute "victimless" activity.


What do you consider vices?
Are not all vices based on the bible and who would be the first to say separation of church and state? The problem I see is if I picked up someone at a bar or church or where ever took them home and had consensual sex its legal, but if I picked up a hooker and paid for it that would be illegal. Where is the logic in that?
What I do in the privacy of my own home by myself or with a consenting adult is none of your business!



posted on Jan, 19 2015 @ 08:59 PM
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Looks like we were right all along. Not so crazy after-all.

Now if they would only listen to us on what to change in the White-House.

Peace



posted on Jan, 19 2015 @ 09:05 PM
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Not all of the news is positive,
We should look at both sides of the coin don't ya think?


He is a clip I found.


"According to the new report by the Rocky Mountain High Intensity Drug Trafficking Area entitled “The Legalization of Marijuana in Colorado: The Impact,” the impact of legalized marijuana in Colorado has resulted in:

1. The majority of DUI drug arrests involve marijuana and 25 to 40 percent were marijuana alone.

2. In 2012, 10.47 percent of Colorado youth ages 12 to 17 were considered current marijuana users compared to 7.55 percent nationally. Colorado ranked fourth in the nation, and was 39 percent higher than the national average.

3. Drug-related student suspensions/expulsions increased 32 percent from school years 2008-09 through 2012-13, the vast majority were for marijuana violations.

4. In 2012, 26.81 percent of college age students were considered current marijuana users compared to 18.89 percent nationally, which ranks Colorado third in the nation and 42 percent above the national average.

5. In 2013, 48.4 percent of Denver adult arrestees tested positive for marijuana, which is a 16 percent increase from 2008.

6. From 2011 through 2013 there was a 57 percent increase in marijuana-related emergency room visits.

7. Hospitalizations related to marijuana has increased 82 percent since 2008."




www.rmhidta.org...


Cheers......


+14 more 
posted on Jan, 19 2015 @ 09:09 PM
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originally posted by: burdman30ott6

originally posted by: LewsTherinThelamon
a reply to: mOjOm


Ok, so what's next on our list???


The rest of the drug war.

And prostitution.


Allow me to be the first to say "no." This is exactly the last thing anyone who supports decriminalization of MJ should be advocating at this time. One of the most listened to, most impactful arguments supporting the new decriminalization laws focused on weed's impact on health and society and the rational argument that the health impact was less than that of tobacco while the societal impacts were less than those of alcohol. Those arguments CANNOT be rationally made about hard drugs or prostitution.

If you want to force the majority of non-pot users who support the push for decriminalization to do an about face and demand a full return to prohibition, raising the "OK, now we need to legalize all vices" argument is a great first step. There is logic behind the legal banning of some substances and some activities... as the manufacture, use, and practice of these does not constitute "victimless" activity.



Portugal is doing just fine after full legalization.

What needs to be illegal is legislating morality!

Can I get an amen!


+11 more 
posted on Jan, 19 2015 @ 09:10 PM
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a reply to: burdman30ott6

Prostitution laws create victims and dehumanizes a portion of the population. Prostitutes hide in dark places to avoid arrest and they live in a dark place because of the way society sees them based on the laws.

Prostitutes offer a service and should be treated with respect by their customers and the law.



posted on Jan, 19 2015 @ 09:35 PM
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originally posted by: theabsolutetruth
Chances are that any societal impact won't be known for a while, give it 10 years, then 20 and see how it affects the emerging generations and their kids, they should be doing a lot of research on it, valuable information stats.


Hopefully it will go the way that the Netherlands did,
Very few Dutch smoke weed and I think this comes down to the novelty and "naughty" factor being taken away. I wouldnt be surprised if the next generation smoke a lot less pot than the current one


+15 more 
posted on Jan, 19 2015 @ 09:40 PM
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a reply to: burdman30ott6


Allow me to be the first to say "no." This is exactly the last thing anyone who supports decriminalization of MJ should be advocating at this time.


It is exactly what any rational person should be advocating for. All drugs need to be legalized. The support of prohibition is the support of violent cartels and the murder and extortion of innocent people. Prohibition laws create victims, prohibition laws are by definiton, criminal. Drug use victimizes the user if use of said drug is unhealthy. But choosing an unhealthy lifestyle is not a crime.


One of the most listened to, most impactful arguments supporting the new decriminalization laws focused on weed's impact on health and society and the rational argument that the health impact was less than that of tobacco while the societal impacts were less than those of alcohol. Those arguments CANNOT be rationally made about hard drugs or prostitution.


1. The health argument is irrelevant garbage. No one has the right to make health decisions for the individual. As I already said, choosing to live an unhealthy lifestyle is not a crime. A person does not deserve jail time simply because they are "unhealthy."

We may as well make obesity illegal and put fat people in prison (it is a choice).

And the majority of drugs are not even as unhealthy as people think they are. MDMA does not eat holes in your brain. Acid does not gather or drip down your spinal cord.

It's all just fear-mongering to rile-up ignorant soccer moms.


If you want to force the majority of non-pot users who support the push for decriminalization to do an about face and demand a full return to prohibition, raising the "OK, now we need to legalize all vices" argument is a great first step.


Other than the fact that prohibition laws are actually destroying society and victimizing innocent people on multiple levels. Nothing rational to see here.


There is logic behind the legal banning of some substances and some activities... as the manufacture, use, and practice of these does not constitute "victimless" activity.


No. There is no logic behind any of it. Using drugs is a victimless crime, no matter which drug we are discussing.

The same poor logic was used for alcohol prohibition. Everyone blamed alcohol for all of societies problems so enough people got together to finally have it banned. Everyone thought that making alcohol illegal would fix society, but it actual made society worse.

Crime rates soared. We saw the rise of violent mob bosses like Al Capone--the type of person who was able to make a killing bootlegging alcohol. Murder rates soared, robberies increased. The crime rates got so bad that we had no choice but to repeal prohibition.

The same thing is happening today because of the war on drugs, but people are too brainwashed and too stupid to see the parallels.

When you make a product that is in demand illegal, you push that product into the black market. The demand follows the product into the criminal underworld, where criminals now have a lucrative way to fund themselves under the table.

In a normal market, if a buyer and seller come to a dispute over a transaction, they can take their disagreement to court to have the dispute settled civilly.

In a black market when a buyer and seller come to a dispute over a transaction, you wind up with drive-bys and gang-related turf wars. The kinds of crimes that kill not only those that are involved, but the innocent bystanders who happen to be in the wrong place at the wrong time.

More harm is brought to society through violent crime because of drug prohibition, than say, a family having to pull together to help a heroine addict or alcoholic.

Society is 20 times worse off because of drug prohibition.

I would seriously take the time to actually educate yourself before replying:

Law Enforcement against Prohibition
edit on 19-1-2015 by LewsTherinThelamon because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 19 2015 @ 09:48 PM
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a reply to: dezertdog


Portugal is doing just fine after full legalization.

What needs to be illegal is legislating morality!

Can I get an amen!


Amen!

Ha!

I love the statistics from Portugal. Good on them for making the most rational decision.



posted on Jan, 20 2015 @ 12:03 AM
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The figures tell a story but the figures don't actually mention the real numbers do they?
The name of the sponsoring org and the content smack of LEO propaganda.....
Student expulsions increased over years of illegality as well as the year of legalization.....2008/9 through 2012/13
Hospitalisations from MJ are up 57 %...but whats that in numbers actually ? could be as few as 3.4 people...who would know? Corresponding numbers for other drugs should be available for comparisaon as well....pot up vrs booze down say....etc...
Also MJ elated hospitalisations up 82% but again no real numbers.....and just what IS an MJ related hospitalisation anyways ?..Are these babies who ate the stash or overdoses of serious nature|? what are the symptoms pray tell?( immense appetite and eventual somnambulant behavior...awakening without hangover ?)
This stuff is meaningless without other related stats like increase or decrease in alchohol related problems...domestic problems etc....
I think this reference is paid for by somebody with an anti pot bias......



posted on Jan, 20 2015 @ 12:08 AM
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Lmao go ahead guys, cut the head clean off the golden egg laying goose, then. God forbid any degree of intelligent battle choosing and thoughtful deference get in the way of any imaginary lawless nirvana some apparently have been lured into believing in.

Oh, and regarding the member who stated prostitution laws are the problem: you are clearly sheltered from the reality of the world. Mexico has legal prostitution, yet sex slavery is rampant through the country... I'd rather not see predatory practices in the USA increase just to cover the asses of a minority of dudes lacking the personality or game needed to not have to pay for it... I'd say that's just me, but polls place me in the majority opinion on that and Democracy is thankfully still in effect in this country. *waves little US flag while whistling*




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