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10 Recommendations on Electromagnetic Fields

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posted on Dec, 2 2014 @ 10:45 PM
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Ok I looked through those lyrics and I am bit confused by what you are saying they ripped off.

Are you saying it is the title of the paper?

Did you read through the pdf and find that the new seekers are actually scientists who published the paper first?

Or are you saying that people working towards/ singing about a better world can not happen at the same time?

Please be a little clearer my lack of discernable critical faculties is getting in my way of understanding you!
edit on America/ChicagoTuesdayAmerica/Chicago12America/Chicago1231pmTuesday11 by elementalgrove because: (no reason given)




posted on Dec, 3 2014 @ 07:02 AM
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originally posted by: tetra50




But I have found books studying this phenomenon, the bioelectric effect and the geomagenetic field, which occurs naturally and seems to influence cell health and growth, from 1979 and earlier. What that indicates along with this abstract, is they've known for quite some time how important this is to the health of all biological creatures, and can be used for sickness, as well as wellness. If the abstract provided by the National Institutes of Health claims now that it's only being known recently. this isn't exactly true. In fact, in 1979, they were researching the effects of electromagnetic field in vitro, on a fetus.


And, did they find anything? In fact, did any trustworthy study find that the geomagnetic field is "important to the health of all biological creatures"? Not counting, of course stuff on bibliotecylapades or educateyourself.




You can't have wireless tech that makes use of this, and keep the secret of what it does to natural organisms. It's just that simple.


Static magnetic fields and the h-field of an EM wave won't have the same effects, especially if that wave is 2GHz. It's just that simple.



ETA: As I'm looking through the comments arguing about this, I wonder if I need to post the proof of what is called non-lethal weaponry by the army, and their ability to use it to cause pain, confusion, burning sensations on the skin,, etc,. and their active denial system also used to protect soldiers from the same in the field. This is a weapon. It's pretty well known, mentioned in several military
documents.


The system itself is called active denial. That's not the name of some system used to protect against it. It causes pain and burning by this little known phenomenon called heat. It's not a primary weapon system, it's used to keep you out of an area, which is why it's called 'active denial'. Fancy that. They make a fence version of it that's very effective. Sort of an invisible dog fence for people.



They both use this and protect from its use. The Department of Defense, in fact, specializes and knows a great deal about building Fairaday Cages, and using this tech in tents which can be erected in the field during wartime for communications……so as not to be effected…..


That's Faraday. And you're completely wrong about the tents. Here's you a test. For the moment, assume you're completely wrong about these being for protection against evil active denial weapons. Why might one want to have a portable structure that is a Faraday cage, inside of which one is using electronic systems conveying tactical and strategic information? There's a neat seven letter word that covers that... I'll give you another hint, just to be fair. I occasionally work in a big Faraday cage, depending on what I'm working on. It's for the same reason, but it's not to protect me against terrorists with gyrotrons.



I'll bring those links, too, if the arguers would like.


I'd like you to start reading for content and not keywords.
edit on 3-12-2014 by Bedlam because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 3 2014 @ 07:07 AM
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originally posted by: elementalgrove

I suppose the reason I say that is because of recorded near death experiences that will always defy science.

People have literally died on an operating room table, their physical body with no more heartbeat, yet somehow whatever you wish to call it, lets say their consciousness has been able to be aware and recount exactly what happened around them in the period in which they were clinically dead.

How can imagination continue beyond life?


People don't die instantly when their hearts stop. But brains that are oxygen deprived can generate the damndest dreams and hallucinations. That doesn't mean their spirits went on journeys, just that the hardware was having an undervolt.



posted on Dec, 3 2014 @ 08:00 AM
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a reply to: Bedlam

I am not describing a dream nor hallucinations, there was no journey at all.

They describe hovering outside of their bodies, observing what is happening in "reality" What the doctors/nurses are doing, saying, how they are reacting, etc. They are able to recount the experience as if they were their.

Alas though, I always enjoy discussing different views!

Thanks for you input Bedlam!



posted on Dec, 3 2014 @ 08:19 AM
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originally posted by: elementalgrove
a reply to: tetra50

I would give you many many more stars for your post here my friend!!

Quite literally this is exactly what I was hoping for!


Above and beyond really, I will have fun learning more about the non-lethal weaponry and the directed energy! I find it shocking that no one else has commented on your well informed post! Thank you for the link to the study as well. I would appreciate whatever links you would like to share




I'll bring more links later this afternoon, as I peruse my library of them, looking for only the most scientific I can find for those asserting an EM field neither exists, is subtle and cannot be measured. This is pure hokum. Either that or the science that supports it is, because there is definitely lots and lots of hard science for many, many years that supports it.

Some of the links I have are for books in pdf format I cannot copy and paste from, so I can supply the book title, or scientific abstract, but those here must look into this for themselves after I do, as I am wary of pulling copyrighted info……

tetra



posted on Dec, 3 2014 @ 08:25 AM
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a reply to: Bedlam

And I'd like you to stop insulting me, and anyone here not agreeing with your particular viewpoint.

I included the name "active denial" in my post, sir. Re-read, please. So I misspelled Faraday, in my haste, which is an unusual slip for me, as I believe you know, since we've been on many of the same threads together.

Yes, heat. How is it, exactly, you believe this heat to be generated: a huge space heater, perhaps, plugged in, in the field, where, exactly?
And yes, they did, actually, find the geomagnetic field to have an effect on all cellular structures of living, biological creatures….it's why they came up with the terms: biomagnetism and biomagnetic, and why there is a term: geomagnetic, for what surrounds the earth……



posted on Dec, 3 2014 @ 08:29 AM
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originally posted by: Bedlam

originally posted by: elementalgrove

I suppose the reason I say that is because of recorded near death experiences that will always defy science.

People have literally died on an operating room table, their physical body with no more heartbeat, yet somehow whatever you wish to call it, lets say their consciousness has been able to be aware and recount exactly what happened around them in the period in which they were clinically dead.

How can imagination continue beyond life?


People don't die instantly when their hearts stop. But brains that are oxygen deprived can generate the damndest dreams and hallucinations. That doesn't mean their spirits went on journeys, just that the hardware was having an undervolt.


You know, it's quite possible that both things are true. It's quite possible, perhaps even probable (though we are currently lacking in methods to measure such things) because that's usually the way of things: neither one or the other being false, but a little of both being true.

The brain, deprived of blood flow bringing hemoglobin carrying oxygen to it to feed its workings, slowly dying, does indeed experience hallucinatory effects. This is just the biological explanation for the experience. But nothing about that, absolutely nothing, denies spirit, soul, and its journey.
tetra

ETA: So, I'm wondering……as you let fly on the black triangle thread you had quite a UFO experience……: were you just experiencing some kind of "brain fart," I wonder, easily explained with biology?

And yes, I know why you would want a Faraday Cage in the field if you are utilizing wireless supplied communications, or using other sensitive electronics, and please stop talking down to me because I don't agree with you. I know very well how to read for content, and I'm pretty sure you know that, too.
edit on 3-12-2014 by tetra50 because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 3 2014 @ 08:43 AM
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Just one book for you Bedlam:
Liboff, A.R., Geomagnetic cyclotron resonance in living cells, J. Biol. Phys., 13, 99-102, 1985

Here's one involving chemistry:
Edmonds, D.T., Larmor precession as a mechanism for the detection of static and alternating magnetic fields, Bioeletrochem. Beioenerg., 30, 3-12, 1993

And yes, the field did have an effect. First, they wrote this:

Blackman, C.F./, Elder, J.A., Weil, C.M., Benane, S.G., Eichinger, D.C., and House, D.E., Induction of calcium-ion effluc from brain tissue by radiofrequency radiation and field strength, Radio Sci., 14, 93-98, 1979

And then, because it had an effect, they went on to write this later:

Blackman, D.F., Benane, S.G., Rabionwitz, J.R., House, D.E., and Joines, W.T., A role for the magnetic field in the radiation-induced effleux of calcium ions from brain tissue in vitro, Bioelectromagnetics, 6, 327-337, 1985.

Not only do there appear to be an awful lot of scientists studying this non existing and/or weak field, there must be something to their discoveries for them to keep studying and writing about it…. And yes, I do know that they found the field to be both existent and to have significant effect on living organisms. In fact, it's doubtful that we could live without it at all, and our cells continue their work to keep us alive and be able to fight disease. However, knowing the benefits of something also necessarily means you then know how to alter it for other than beneficial purposes.
edit on 3-12-2014 by tetra50 because: (no reason given)

edit on 3-12-2014 by tetra50 because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 3 2014 @ 09:07 AM
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This is another interesting article, again military, in its scope:

The Mind Has No Firewall, by Timothy L. Thomas
strategicstudiesinstitute.army.mil...
in which he discusses the development of specific weaponry involving the use of the EM field, among other things. From the article:


US Views on "Wonder Weapons": Altering the Data-Processing Ability of the Body

What technologies have been examined by the United States that possess the potential to disrupt the data-processing capabilities of the human organism? The 7 July 1997 issue of U.S. News and World Report described several of them designed, among other things, to vibrate the insides of humans, stun or nauseate them, put them to sleep, heat them up, or knock them down with a shock wave.[9] The technologies include dazzling lasers that can force the pupils to close; acoustic or sonic frequencies that cause the hair cells in the inner ear to vibrate and cause motion sickness, vertigo, and nausea, or frequencies that resonate the internal organs causing pain and spasms; and shock waves with the potential to knock down humans or airplanes and which can be mixed with pepper spray or chemicals.[10]

With modification, these technological applications can have many uses. Acoustic weapons, for example, could be adapted for use as acoustic rifles or as acoustic fields that, once established, might protect facilities, assist in hostage rescues, control riots, or clear paths for convoys. These waves, which can penetrate buildings, offer a host of opportunities for military and law enforcement officials. Microwave weapons, by stimulating the peripheral nervous system, can heat up the body, induce epileptic-like seizures, or cause cardiac arrest. Low-frequency radiation affects the electrical activity of the brain and can cause flu-like symptoms and nausea. Other projects sought to induce or prevent sleep, or to affect the signal from the motor cortex portion of the brain, overriding voluntary muscle movements. The latter are referred to as pulse wave weapons, and the Russian government has reportedly bought over 100,000 copies of the "Black Widow" version of them.[11]

However, this view of "wonder weapons" was contested by someone who should understand them. Brigadier General Larry Dodgen, Deputy Assistant to the Secretary of Defense for Policy and Missions, wrote a letter to the editor about the "numerous inaccuracies" in the U.S. News and World Report article that "misrepresent the Department of Defense's views."[12] Dodgen's primary complaint seemed to have been that the magazine misrepresented the use of these technologies and their value to the armed forces. He also underscored the US intent to work within the scope of any international treaty concerning their application, as well as plans to abandon (or at least redesign) any weapon for which countermeasures are known. One is left with the feeling, however, that research in this area is intense. A concern not mentioned by Dodgen is that other countries or non-state actors may not be bound by the same constraints. It is hard to imagine someone with a greater desire than terrorists to get their hands on these technologies. "Psycho-terrorism" could be the next buzzword.



Although this information was argued with at the time by the then Dep. Ass. to the Sec. of Def., if one reads on, further info has been leaked about what is being studied. This information is backed up in other places, as well. All parties are careful, though, about the dissemination of such info., as this type of weaponry is not recognized as accepted by the Geneva Convention treaties, for example, so information about the development of it is carefully leaked, in many cases. Not so much now, though. No one cares too much these days, except to say that the EM field either doesn't exist or doesn't have an effect. It seems almost funny to me anyone would take that position, as there is so very much scientific data and study about this supposedly non existent thing…..

More from the article:


Russian Views on "Psychotronic War"

The term "psycho-terrorism" was coined by Russian writer N. Anisimov of the Moscow Anti-Psychotronic Center. According to Anisimov, psychotronic weapons are those that act to "take away a part of the information which is stored in a man's brain. It is sent to a computer, which reworks it to the level needed for those who need to control the man, and the modified information is then reinserted into the brain." These weapons are used against the mind to induce hallucinations, sickness, mutations in human cells, "zombification," or even death. Included in the arsenal are VHF generators, X-rays, ultrasound, and radio waves. Russian army Major I. Chernishev, writing in the military journal Orienteer in February 1997, asserted that "psy" weapons are under development all over the globe. Specific types of weapons noted by Chernishev (not all of which have prototypes) were:

A psychotronic generator, which produces a powerful electromagnetic emanation capable of being sent through telephone lines, TV, radio networks, supply pipes, and incandescent lamps.
An autonomous generator, a device that operates in the 10-150 Hertz band, which at the 10-20 Hertz band forms an infrasonic oscillation that is destructive to all living creatures.
A nervous system generator, designed to paralyze the central nervous systems of insects, which could have the same applicability to humans.
Ultrasound emanations, which one institute claims to have developed. Devices using ultrasound emanations are supposedly capable of carrying out bloodless internal operations without leaving a mark on the skin. They can also, according to Chernishev, be used to kill.
Noiseless cassettes. Chernishev claims that the Japanese have developed the ability to place infra-low frequency voice patterns over music, patterns that are detected by the subconscious. Russians claim to be using similar "bombardments" with computer programming to treat alcoholism or smoking.
The 25th-frame effect, alluded to above, a technique wherein each 25th frame of a movie reel or film footage contains a message that is picked up by the subconscious. This technique, if it works, could possibly be used to curb smoking and alcoholism, but it has wider, more sinister applications if used on a TV audience or a computer operator.
Psychotropics, defined as medical preparations used to induce a trance, euphoria, or depression. Referred to as "slow-acting mines," they could be slipped into the food of a politician or into the water supply of an entire city. Symptoms include headaches, noises, voices or commands in the brain, dizziness, pain in the abdominal cavities, cardiac arrhythmia, or even the destruction of the cardiovascular system.
There is confirmation from US researchers that this type of study is going on. Dr. Janet Morris, coauthor of The Warrior's Edge, reportedly went to the Moscow Institute of Psychocorrelations in 1991. There she was shown a technique pioneered by the Russian Department of Psycho-Correction at Moscow Medical Academy in which researchers electronically analyze the human mind in order to influence it. They input subliminal command messages, using key words transmitted in "white noise" or music. Using an infra-sound, very low frequency transmission, the acoustic psycho-correction message is transmitted via bone conduction.[13]



posted on Dec, 3 2014 @ 10:55 AM
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a reply to: Bedlam

More specific to your question, here's a book on that:

Blanchard, J.P. and Blackman, C.F., Clarification and amplicfication of an ion parametric resonance model for magnetic field interations with biological systems, Bioelectromagnetics, 23, 522-530, 2002

There's an awful lot of study of the issues you are asserting are nonexistent, for it to have entier books written about it and scientific study surrounding its effects.



posted on Dec, 3 2014 @ 11:24 AM
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originally posted by: elementalgrove
Ok I looked through those lyrics and I am bit confused by what you are saying they ripped off.

" ... teach the world to sing in perfect harmony "
translated into technobabble =
" create a coherent planetary standing wave ".
edit on 3-12-2014 by Frank12345 because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 3 2014 @ 11:55 AM
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originally posted by: tetra50
a reply to: Bedlam

I included the name "active denial" in my post, sir. Re-read, please.


So you did...as the name of a way to defend soldiers from the device. As I said, there is no straight-forward defense and the system itself is called active denial.



Yes, heat. How is it, exactly, you believe this heat to be generated: a huge space heater, perhaps, plugged in, in the field, where, exactly?


Not so much, it's typically a big gyrotron if it's Army, AF uses CARMs.



And yes, they did, actually, find the geomagnetic field to have an effect on all cellular structures of living, biological creatures….it's why they came up with the terms: biomagnetism and biomagnetic, and why there is a term: geomagnetic, for what surrounds the earth……


Well, they don't call it geomagnetism or biomagnetism because it has an effect on all living creatures. Geomagnetism means it's a magnetic field associated with the earth. Biomagnetism would be a magnetic field associated with an organism. But there's no implicit linkage of the terms.

Worse, biomagnetism's definitions are many and varied, and it's one of those terms that attracts woo peddlers.



posted on Dec, 3 2014 @ 12:10 PM
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originally posted by: tetra50
But nothing about that, absolutely nothing, denies spirit, soul, and its journey.
tetra


But nothing proves or requires its existence, either.



ETA: So, I'm wondering……as you let fly on the black triangle thread you had quite a UFO experience……: were you just experiencing some kind of "brain fart," I wonder, easily explained with biology?


We weren't dead at the time. Had I been suffering from anoxia, I would have discounted it totally.



And yes, I know why you would want a Faraday Cage in the field if you are utilizing wireless supplied communications, or using other sensitive electronics, and please stop talking down to me because I don't agree with you.


Well, you said it was to protect people in the tent against microwave attack. Humor me. Why would you have a fieldable Faraday cage?



posted on Dec, 3 2014 @ 12:14 PM
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Re: " HeartMath hiring ... advisory board full of people with excellent credentials ... "

Looking closely at the " Institute of HeartMath Scientific Advisory Board " , these could just be scientists whose research HeartMath have used / miss-used , not necessarily with their permission. Their appearance does not necessarily mean they approve of HeartMath or the products it sells.

Odd that HeartMath don’t have a profile-image of board member “T. Gregory Quinn, M.D., cardiologist, director of cardiac rehabilitation at San Ramon Regional Medical Center in Oakland, Calif., ... practicing jujitsu martial artist ” , as an image of him is Googleable ... sutterhealth.org/dr-thomas-g-quinn.html
edit on 3-12-2014 by Frank12345 because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 3 2014 @ 01:44 PM
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a reply to: Bedlam




Humor me. Why would you have a fieldable Faraday cage?



To provide secure communications, obviously. I'm not an idiot, Bedlam.
I have already stated this. That's the primary reason, but probably not the only one, either.
However, other reasons won't be discussed.

How is it you think those communications occur? Wow, they occur using the electromagnetic field….
Radar utilizes the electromagnetic field, as well.

You didn't comment on all those scholarly publications I took the time to give you in bibliographic form, as well.
I'm not peddling any woo.

I wonder what you think the physics of "Electromagnetic Field Theory," to be about. Quantum electrodynamics which was a term introduced by and studied and published and won a Nobel prize for Richard Feynman. Thiis stuff has been around quite a while. There's absolutely a field. This is pretty well known. I guess your assertion is it doesn't interact with biological creatures on a cellular level, is that it?
edit on 3-12-2014 by tetra50 because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 3 2014 @ 05:30 PM
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originally posted by: tetra50

To provide secure communications, obviously. I'm not an idiot, Bedlam.
I have already stated this. That's the primary reason, but probably not the only one, either.
However, other reasons won't be discussed.


See? You knew already. It's for TEMPEST. It's not to protect the comm guys from a VMADS attack.



How is it you think those communications occur? Wow, they occur using the electromagnetic field….
Radar utilizes the electromagnetic field, as well.

You didn't comment on all those scholarly publications I took the time to give you in bibliographic form, as well.
I'm not peddling any woo.


Your point being? BTW, I was on my phone all day. It's a real ass pain to read pdfs, or make detailed replies.

Now. You are confusing a lot of things, apparently, looking back at this.

"I'll bring more links later this afternoon, as I peruse my library of them, looking for only the most scientific I can find for those asserting an EM field neither exists, is subtle and cannot be measured. This is pure hokum."

No one said that EM fields didn't exist or couldn't be measured. I do it for a job. What I was saying to elemental was that the "subtle energies" bit was a line of hokum. Because they are. Anytime you see someone appeal to "subtle" or "putative" energy, it's bullpuckey. THAT conversation wasn't about EM. It was about "auras" or "spirit energy" or vibrations or some such thing.

What I was saying to you was that geomagnetism wasn't a requirement for life in any way. And it's not.

eta: And that psychotronic crap...really?

edit on 3-12-2014 by Bedlam because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 3 2014 @ 07:24 PM
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a reply to: Frank12345

Lol

Really! You can do that with anything you want because you are the one translating it with your own odd bias.

Example-My end quote for my avatar on this webiste.

teach the world to sing in perfect harmony

Translated hippie speak

Your gift to the world is you make it a good one!

Oh man you got me! Here I thought I came up with it all those years ago and some no name band wrote some cliche song, that i never heard of and I must have took it from them!

LOL seriously man, quite the stretch, how many people have sung about the world being in harmony, how many organizations are currently working toward that.



posted on Dec, 3 2014 @ 07:26 PM
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a reply to: Frank12345

Main word in your theory is COULD

Go find some proof that no one on that advisory board wishes to be there and that the institute has fraudulently used their work, if that was the case it would not be difficult.



posted on Dec, 4 2014 @ 05:32 PM
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Here are excerpts from report from an ex-employee of HeartMath ...


... This product, called the emWave Personal Stress Reliever sells for $199 and ostensibly tells you when your HRV achieves a level of coherence. The problem I see with this product is that there’s no scientific consensus that ‘coherence’ does anything useful or that achieving it through this product has any beneficial effect at all. In my experience those who used the product and claimed success fell well within the realm of the placebo effect. For $199, I would suggest that folks simply practice deep breathing relaxation and save the money, but ultimately you should have a look at the HeartMath website and decide for yourself. I for one am deeply concerned about the reality of such products.
... Certainly when one looks at HeartMath’s Scientific Advisory Board, it’s impressive. I’m not sure how all these MD’s can get on board with HeartMath’s premise, but maybe since I was at HeartMath’s campus (over 5 years ago) they have backed off of some of the more unusual claims they have about the heart. I would suggest that anyone looking into their products to be highly skeptical.
archive.randi.org /site/index.php/swift-blog/1202--is-heartmaths-emwave-personal-stress-reliever-scientific-.html
edit on 4-12-2014 by Frank12345 because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 4 2014 @ 07:17 PM
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a reply to: Frank12345

First off, no surprise at all about skepticism coming from the JREF.

Second as it states at the bottom, the board is impressive. The MD's must have valid reason for being on board with it, since it has been 5 years and people have had an opportunity to distance themselves, show me some proof that they have.

Perhaps they are a tad bit more "spiritual" you know that unprovable feeling so many have experienced and follwed since the beginning of time as we know it

edit on America/ChicagoThursdayAmerica/Chicago12America/Chicago1231pmThursday8 by elementalgrove because: (no reason given)



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