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California inmates with life sentences are leaving prison on parole in record numbers.

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posted on Feb, 25 2014 @ 05:15 PM
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www.policeone.com...


Since Gov. Jerry Brown assumed office in January 2011, a record number of inmates with life sentences are winning parole. Brown has allowed the release of nearly 1,400 lifers, while going along with the parole board about 82 percent of the time.



Brown's predecessor, Arnold Schwarzenegger, authorized the release of 557 lifers during his six-year term, sustaining the board at a 27 percent clip. Before that, Gov. Gray Davis over 3 years approved the release of two.


To back up a bit, not too long ago, California was hit by a court-order that stated California's prisons were massively overcrowded and the state needed to change that. California was given a few year time frame to make adjustments and reduce their prison population by then.


This dramatic shift in releases under Brown comes as the state grapples with court orders to ease a decades-long prison crowding crisis that has seen triple bunking, prison gyms turned into dormitories and inmates shipped out of state.


This is a result of that. Guess how many of the 'lifers' are murderers? It's around 80%


Crime victims and their advocates have said the releases are an injustice to the victims and that the parolees could pose a danger to the public. More than 80 percent of lifers are in prison for murder, while the remaining are mostly rapists and kidnappers.



"This is playing Russian roulette with public safety," said Christine Ward, executive director of the Crime Victims Action Alliance. "This is a change of philosophy that can be dangerous."


This does look pretty nasty, but apparently, recidivism of lifers out on parole is very low.


The few studies of recidivism among released lifers including a Stanford University report show they re-offend at much lower rates than other inmates released on parole and none has been convicted of a new murder.



Of the 860 murderers paroled between 1990 and 2010 that Stanford tracked, only five inmates committed new crimes and none were convicted of murder. The average released lifer is in his mid-50s. Experts say older ex-cons are less prone to commit new crimes than younger ones.


The extremely low recidivism rates do look good, but then again, these are record numbers of 'lifers' being released.




posted on Feb, 25 2014 @ 05:32 PM
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reply to post by buni11687
 


In some strict, and controlled situations a lot of 'lifers' should be given a second chance. Generally those convicted of 2nd degree murder did it out of a rage, or retaliation. BUT, I feel only letting out those who have served a long sentence already and shown good behavior should be considered for this chance.
To put things into perspective, think about the DUI conviction rates and the re-offending rate in that situation. There are guys out on the roads with 4+ DUI's under their belt, in theory they are a MUCH greater hazard to society than say a guy who spent 15+ years in prison for killing a guy when he was in his early 20's out of a rage. Do you think he learned his lesson then? Or will he kill again facing much harsher sentencing. Statistically speaking and from a medical point of view a person convicted of a DUI will almost ALWAYS re-offend, the killer not so much.



posted on Feb, 25 2014 @ 05:36 PM
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The extremely low recidivism rates do look good, but then again, these are record numbers of 'lifers' being released.


A life sentence is a life sentence, just because they get parole does not mean they aren't in jail anymore. Now they have a bigger fence.

They are walking on thin ice the entire time they are out, and see their parole officers constantly, and if they screw up they know exactly where they are going.

The recidivism rates for them is really the only thing that matters.



posted on Feb, 25 2014 @ 06:39 PM
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reply to post by boncho
 


They are walking on thin ice the entire time they are out, and see their parole officers constantly, and if they screw up they know exactly where they are going.

A consequence of them screwing up again being another murdered person?


The recidivism rates for them is really the only thing that matters.

As I understand it repeat offenses among violent offenders is high. Am I wrong?
edit on 25-2-2014 by Lucid Lunacy because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 25 2014 @ 07:13 PM
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Lucid Lunacy
reply to post by boncho
 


They are walking on thin ice the entire time they are out, and see their parole officers constantly, and if they screw up they know exactly where they are going.

A consequence of them screwing up again being another murdered person?


or a bullet and body bag curtsy of some home owner when they go back to there criminal ways



posted on Feb, 25 2014 @ 08:59 PM
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Lucid Lunacy
reply to post by boncho
 


They are walking on thin ice the entire time they are out, and see their parole officers constantly, and if they screw up they know exactly where they are going.

A consequence of them screwing up again being another murdered person?

The recidivism rates for them is really the only thing that matters.

edit on 25-2-2014 by Lucid Lunacy because: (no reason given)



Not really. Where this is occurring life sentences were being handed out for almost anything.


A life sentence has become an acceptable punishment not only for murder, but also for a wide variety of other crimes, some of them quite trivial. Under California’s draconian three-strikes laws, people have received 25 years-to-life sentences for minor infractions like stealing pizza from children and stealing change from a parked car. In November 2011, a circuit court judge in Florida sentenced a 26-year-old man whose home computer contained hundreds of pornographic images to life in prison without the possibility of parole.

www.prisonlegalnews.org...

But you raise a good issue which is still backed up by real world data.


four-fold typology of homicide offenders: 1) homicide that was precipitated by a general
altercation or argument, 2) homicide during the commission of a felony, 3) domestic violence-related homicide, and 4) a homicide
after an accident. In conclusion, none of the 336 homicide offenders committed another murder.

nj.gov...

Essentially there are various forms of homicide. Yes many will probably never be able to reintegrate into society, but a good number of them can, because there circumstances were a one time thing. A person could be being emotionally/physically abused by their boyfriend, finally had enough, then killed them. I am not justify their actions, simply pointing out that circumstance and cause has everything to do with it.


As I understand it repeat offenses among violent offenders is high. Am I wrong?


Technically yes. If you think murderers make up all violent offenders. Violent offenders that have crimes based in monetary gain, drug trade, gang activity, etc, are the statistic that pushes that number up. Of course serial killers as well. But there are plenty of other kinds of violent crime that is not as serious.



posted on Feb, 25 2014 @ 09:16 PM
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The USA does happen to have the most draconian of laws in some states.....
Like the man told ya....you could get life in California for three separate shoplifting convictions....



posted on Feb, 25 2014 @ 09:52 PM
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So that's how he turned back breaking red ink into black on paper.

What a guy....to some people. I do hope all those parolees are well behaved or just territorial enough to stay in California. That's really all I ask. Living with their own solutions seems fair to me.



posted on Feb, 26 2014 @ 12:38 AM
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reply to post by Wrabbit2000
 


Here's what I know.
Ten percent of the lifers they let out, can't handle it on the out's.
They will tell you straight out I'll be back in with-in a week. I seen so
many go back with-in a couple of days because they're just done with
life. So they just violate and go back They like having no responsibilities.
Fifty percent will try to stay out but mess up and go back on violations.
20 percent actually make good on their chance at life. So no matter what,
20 percent are a real worry. I been around.






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