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Danish zoo kills 18 month old giraffe in front of public: feeds body to lions

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posted on Feb, 10 2014 @ 10:52 AM
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reply to post by needlenight
 

Then why did the zoo allow the parents to breed with each other?
And why did they wait two years to 'put down' the baby?
I don't get it.




posted on Feb, 10 2014 @ 10:53 AM
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needlenight
reply to post by nixie_nox
 


Fine fine, you win and I get peace.




Two souls one mind

edit on 10-2-2014 by Mianeye because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 10 2014 @ 11:03 AM
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Mianeye
reply to post by BELIEVERpriest
 

We don't live in a Disney world where everything has a happy ending.

Get over it.


edit on 10-2-2014 by Mianeye because: (no reason given)


Go join the Nazis if thats your attitude.



posted on Feb, 10 2014 @ 11:03 AM
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reply to post by Spiramirabilis
 


Well im sorry you dont like zoos and of course aquariums are the only ones trying to preserve wildlife. You have to realize all those people that go out and study and catalog wildlife usually work for a zoo. And the conservation programs usual start with a zoo. Right now there the only ones that care about nature. Im sure im not going to change your mind but at least think about it as i said zoos arent the same anymore. My ex wife works at a zoo and her job is conservation research not taking care of animals.



posted on Feb, 10 2014 @ 11:18 AM
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Many people signed signatures(over 20,000)offered money(over half a million) to buy the animal, yet it was refused.

They could have released it in the wild and let it fend off before it becomes a food.

The giraffe had no chance again a bolt gun.



posted on Feb, 10 2014 @ 11:23 AM
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reply to post by dragonridr
 


It's not that I don't like zoos - It's just that I love the animals

There was a time in my life when I lived at the zoo. But I came to realize that there are better ways - and that zoos are not necessarily good for the animals. I think we''re coming up on a time when we start to look at all this differently

Our views change - my views changed

I'd rather put all our effort and money into conservation of our natural world

But don't worry - I get that I'm in the minority

:-)



posted on Feb, 10 2014 @ 11:34 AM
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luciddream
Many people signed signatures(over 20,000)offered money(over half a million) to buy the animal, yet it was refused.

They could have released it in the wild and let it fend off before it becomes a food.

The giraffe had no chance again a bolt gun.


Its be more cruel releasing it into the wild he was born in captivity he wouldn't make it a week and die of starvation.Then there is the inbreeding factor dont want to allow any genetic disorders into the wild do far more damage in the long run if he survived. As far as the offers if someone had actually came with a check for over half a million and wanted to take the giraffe they wouldnt have said no. Dont believe internet rumors.
edit on 2/10/14 by dragonridr because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 10 2014 @ 11:39 AM
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reply to post by Spiramirabilis
 


Well i see yeah zoos are not the best place for animals but they are the safest. With whats going on with wildlife in africa and other continents. My hope is zoos will help educate people before its to late see it puts a face on the animals so to speak. Seeing themis alot different then reading about them and this makes people want to save them. And as i said zoos are the only ones attempting to save wildlife right now imagine if they werent around no one would care.



posted on Feb, 10 2014 @ 11:42 AM
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reply to post by dragonridr
 


Inbreeding happens in nature even if its not common.

An animal born in captivity may have less chance in the wild but it has NO chance against a bolt gun.

This isn't a internet rumor.


He said his zoo had turned down offers from other ones to take Marius and an offer from a private individual who wanted to buy the giraffe for 500,000 euros ($680,000).


Link
edit on 2/10/2014 by luciddream because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 10 2014 @ 11:45 AM
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reply to post by dragonridr
 



And as i said zoos are the only ones attempting to save wildlife right now imagine if they werent around no one would care.


You would care :-)

And so would I

There are millions of people in this environmental movement. They might not (though I so hope they do) accomplish all they want to - but they're on it



posted on Feb, 10 2014 @ 11:55 AM
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luciddream
Many people signed signatures(over 20,000)offered money(over half a million) to buy the animal, yet it was refused.

They could have released it in the wild and let it fend off before it becomes a food.

The giraffe had no chance again a bolt gun.


Better yet, the money offered could have been used to buy a herd of cows or something to feed the lions.

Giraffes are exotic animals and should be treated as such.
edit on 10-2-2014 by Skywatcher2011 because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 10 2014 @ 12:21 PM
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I am a lover of all Earthlings. Granted some critters I am more fond of then others and though there is a symbiotic bound with all life forms on our little blue marble, all insects fall very low on my list.

This event causes me to have mixed feelings. I know the intent is to tug at my heart strings and to manipulate me into thinking of the participants as cold, heartless, cruel people. Yet every day untold numbers of animals are killed, often senselessly. I do think we should speak out against crue and evil acts of harm performed against any living innocent creature. Yet, we have to acknowledge that the meat on our plates came from a living innocent creature which we consume and slaughter in greater numbers then we actually use.

We have children starving in places, while people are throwing away good food by the thousandth of pounds. When we feed our children hot dogs, hamburgers, fish and chicken, don't you think they should know how it got to their plates?

We are supposed to be caregivers of our planet, that includes the inhabitants. We have a duty and responsibility to protect the life that is the glue that holds our existence on this planet stable and continuing.

I don't know the real reasons why the Zoo didn't choose a less controversial solution to their problem. Maybe they think the controversy will increase the number of people that come to their zoo. Did the giraffe have to die, probably not, but they would have killed another animal to feed to the lions, just as most will likely dine on a dead animal at sometime during their day.

So is the problem the giraffe or the killing of an animal? I think that if they are going to kill animals, it is more wrong to lie or hide it from the children than to let them see the horror involved in the taking of a life. Maybe seeing the ugliness of it will make them better, more loving and compassionate people when they grow up. That has to be a call made by the parents. Growing up in the country I had to participate in the harvesting and slaughtering of the food that was served in my home.I didn't eat a lot of meat as a child and I don't eat much of it as an adult. I don't have ill will or feelings towards carnivores and some of my best friends are diehard meat eaters. It is the senseless, wasted, and killing for entertainment, that I take umbrage with.


edit on 10-2-2014 by NightSkyeB4Dawn because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 10 2014 @ 12:32 PM
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Even though this editor is not a member here at ATS, I found his thoughts very interesting, and I think it hits the point quite well...

Euthanising Marius the giraffe shows a shocking lack of compassion
www.theguardian.com...


Copenhagen Zoo said it had no choice but to kill the young giraffe. Under European Association of Zoos and Aquaria (Eaza) rules, inbreeding of any animal is quite rightly avoided. According to the zoo, although Marius was healthy, his genes were already well represented at the zoo and none of the 300 other Eaza-affiliated zoos could take him.Castration was considered cruel with “undesirable effects” and releasing him into the wild was thought unlikely to be successful.

So why didn’t they just build him another pen? I realise that birth control is easier for human beings but surely even zoos consider family planning.

The problem comes down to money and finance. Of course Marius and the Longleat lions could have been saved. All they needed to do was make another enclosure. It’s as simple as that. But of course that takes money and manpower.

I don’t doubt senior management at both institutions, like the keepers, care for their animals. Indeed both parks have released press statements highlighting the fact that animal welfare comes first, but recent events beg the question of how they get into these predicaments in the first place, and whether they are genuinely understand their ‘customers’, the people that pay good money to see their collections. They are animal lovers. Passionate about the Henrys and Mariuses of this world. It’s why ‘adopt an animal’ schemes have been so successful.

Which brings us back to the bigger issue – if we can’t control a small number of animals in an artificial environment, what hope have we of controlling the spiralling slaughter of hundreds of thousands of wild animals?

The Copenhagen giraffe could have been translocated. A risky business, I’ll agree. I have witnessed several translocation a of giraffes in Africa and it is a nerve wracking ordeal for all concerned. Giraffes are skittish creatures and it’s not uncommon for them to have a heart attack through fear. The movement of any semi wild creature is unpleasant, but surely it’s a better option than euthanasia?


But what I do wonder what it would cost to build an additional pen to keep the animal. If it was over a million dollars then the bid offer from one individual was not enough and therefore the zoo (which is a business to make profits) felt it will not want the loss in the books and would follow the EZA rules...and this was made public, which came down to a poor PR scenario.



posted on Feb, 10 2014 @ 12:43 PM
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Something else to note, these kinds of practices are usually not presented to public and this one the first time. Who knows what other cruelty to animals they do behind closed doors....just a thought.

www.cnn.com...

Whilst it cannot be undone, Marius' death has served an important purpose in shining a spotlight on a practice which is normally kept well-hidden from public view. As long as there are zoos, there will be unwanted animals. And as long as there are unwanted animals, more like Marius will be killed.



posted on Feb, 10 2014 @ 01:07 PM
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reply to post by Skywatcher2011
 


Its not only building another pen that costs money. Taking care of him for the rest of his life costs money. Money not well spent when he was not able to mate and reproduce. It sounds harsh yes. But European Zoo's dont have infinite money to draw on. Sure they could have spent alot of money on Marius. But it would have had consequences for other animals and other studies, which are more vital and more important. The money would have to be taken from somewhere else.

Yes he was cute, but hey, this is how it has to be.



posted on Feb, 10 2014 @ 01:14 PM
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reply to post by Skywatcher2011
 


Here in Denmark we take pride in teaching our children what is what. The children honestly enjoyed the whole thing. Both the autopsy and the feeding the rest to the lions. Once again, it was a learning experience.

Also I might add that several parts of the giraffe was sent to various universities for studies on how to better take care of giraffes. Some of his stomach is even being used in a study on how to make cows produce less methane. It's not like hes going to waste. Yes yes, cruel and heartless. I dont mean to be. But trust me, the zoo and the people involved in this, has done all they could to make the best out of a situation that could not have been easy for them.

I have been to Copenhagen Zoo many times in my life. And the zoo keepers truely love the animals they care for. It is easy to see. The zookeepers are not switched out, they are hired to take care of a specific animal or specific group of animals. And they form a bond with them. They put their heart and soul into this job. And sometimes situations like these are just a part of it. Im glad they are finally opening up and showing us that side of it aswell. Denmark is all about honesty and showing both sides of the story. For better or worse. (And hey.. you cant tell me it isnt working.. we have the least corrupt system in the world, some the most brilliant minds and have just been awarded the title of being europeans most innovative country.. and theres only around 6 million of us.)



posted on Feb, 10 2014 @ 01:50 PM
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reply to post by Skywatcher2011
 


I don't want to make light of anyone's feelings about this occurrence, but you make a good point. We don't know what goes on and is accepted as standard practice, beyond the public eye, and hidden and not so hidden video has shown on numerous occasions, less than acceptable behavior displayed by caregivers, even when the elderly and children are involved. We know what, too often, happens when those that once were sworn to protect and serve let their ego and their temper go unchecked.

We are a species that continuously displays behavior that is confusing and contradicting. We
will do things in a crowd we would never do if alone. We will do things alone that we would never do if we think someone is looking. We often are unsure of what we will do or won't. We are an enigma. We are such poor judges of our own thoughts and behavior, yet, we are quick to judge another's. But no one is likely to trust anyone that will hurt an animal without good cause.



posted on Feb, 10 2014 @ 01:59 PM
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reply to post by pheonix358
 


Sex and reproduction is part of life as well. Should we do this in front of children??? No.

Where does the bald mine draw the line on washing his face?



posted on Feb, 10 2014 @ 03:39 PM
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violet
reply to post by pheonix358
 


Sex and reproduction is part of life as well. Should we do this in front of children??? No.

Where does the bald mine draw the line on washing his face?




They show animals mating all the time in nature shows i guess you draw the line when there human.



posted on Feb, 10 2014 @ 07:11 PM
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violet
reply to post by pheonix358
 


Sex and reproduction is part of life as well. Should we do this in front of children??? No.



You are getting into an off topic area here.

May I suggest you start a new discussion and ask that question. Some parents do so for educational purposes. Of course that information will likely explode your mind but there it is. It is a natural practice in many parts of this world.

P



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