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China lands Jade Rabbit robot rover on Moon

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posted on Dec, 14 2013 @ 03:39 PM
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scotsdavy1
reply to post by Hellhound604
 


Truthfully, I'm not interested in having a discussion about the colour of the moon, only about China landing a craft there and this is what this post is all about anyway.


Yes, That is Very Cool and you know What, Knowing my wife and her family the way I do, by the time America makes it back to the Moon, they'll have a Chinese Buffet orTake Out to choice from, I'm sure one of my Nephews will deliver!




posted on Dec, 14 2013 @ 03:40 PM
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reply to post by Hellhound604
 


I'm not interested in the slightest about having a discussion about the colour of the moon. It just came up and nothing else. If you want an argument then please go elsewhere as I'm not in the mood for one at all. I posted this about China's achievement yet you and some others like to point out any other things I may or may not have said.
I could say the moon is made of green cheese or suchlike but I don't care, only that what I originally posted here for others to see and read that didn't know about it.
This is going off topic and I will not do so under any circumstances so please, give it a rest as I won't answer any more on that subject.



posted on Dec, 14 2013 @ 03:42 PM
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reply to post by Aleister
 

Yeah mate, I must say I'm pleasantly surprised with their efficiency and transparency.



posted on Dec, 14 2013 @ 03:50 PM
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reply to post by scotsdavy1
 





I posted this about China's achievement

You're right, China's achievement, and China does Everything For A reason

China won't got to the Moon just to go, They plan to mine the Moon and put in place on the Moon a permanent Colony to advance their Space exploration and mining of the Moons resources.
China has a plan for every thing and a long range goal to meet, the Moon and Mars is part of their Plan.
edit on 14-12-2013 by guohua because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 14 2013 @ 03:55 PM
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WOW, awesome animated gifs of rover deployment. (I meant to upload them here, but the files are too big)

Linky



posted on Dec, 14 2013 @ 04:08 PM
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alfa1

scotsdavy1
will see if they pick up the stars from the moon as well....



Why would you expect the cameras to pick up stars if the exposure is set for viewing the surface?

Is it because being "in space" somehow magically changes the laws of optics?


yes being "in space" does as you need special cameras to operate in the "vacuum of space" you cant just get any old camera hence it does change the laws of optics as you wouldnt need a special camera otherwise and would be able to use my cameraphone



posted on Dec, 14 2013 @ 04:50 PM
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Chamberf=6

Maxatoria
Waits for the 'They never landed on the moon and its all done in a parking lot in beijing' threads


Also waiting for the "they're not telling us everything--they found structures" crowd.


Why didn't they go to the dark side?




posted on Dec, 14 2013 @ 04:53 PM
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reply to post by scotsdavy1
 

Loving this thread (apart from the normal nonsense). I can't wait to see what that little dude finds. Nice to see some real activity up there for a change.



posted on Dec, 14 2013 @ 04:55 PM
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guohua

............China's achievement, and China does Everything For A reason

China won't got to the Moon just to go, They plan to mine the Moon and put in place on the Moon a permanent Colony to advance their Space exploration and mining of the Moons resources.
China has a plan for every thing and a long range goal to meet, the Moon and Mars is part of their Plan.


Indeed......

The new rover is currently transmitting a repeated coded signal back to Earth in what appears to Morse Code or binary;




01000001 01101100 01101100 00100000 01011001 01101111 01110101 01110010 00100000 01000010 01100001 01110011 01100101 00100000 01000001 01110010 01100101 00100000 01000010 01100101 01101100 01101111 01101110 01100111 00100000 01110100 01101111 00100000 01010101 01110011 00100000 01011011 01001110 01101111 01110100 00100000 01010101 01010011 01011101













posted on Dec, 14 2013 @ 05:13 PM
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anonymous1legion
yes being "in space" does as you need special cameras to operate in the "vacuum of space" you cant just get any old camera hence it does change the laws of optics


Not really, no.
Since the topic started with discussion of Apollo missions and their seeing stars (or not), it may well be worth your doing some reading how how ordinary earthly Hasselblad cameras had to be modified for space.
You will find all the modifications revolve around:
-making them lighter,
-making them easier to use for the Astronauts,
-reticle marks, for those "crosses" you see in the pictures,
-painting them silver to reflect sunlight.

...and other more ordinary things like that.

No modification was ever required for any new magical special outer spacey optical phenomenon that affects the way they would record stars.



posted on Dec, 14 2013 @ 05:15 PM
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reply to post by mirageman
 


If that is the correct binary code, I put it into a translator and this is what it says on the left hand side!





posted on Dec, 14 2013 @ 05:28 PM
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China's Jade Rabbit robot rover has driven off its landing module and on to the Moon's surface.

The robotic vehicle rolled down a ramp lowered by the lander and on to the volcanic plain known as Sinus Iridum.

Earlier on Saturday, the landing module containing the rover fired its thrusters to perform the first soft landing on the Moon since 1976.

The touchdown in the Moon's northern hemisphere marks the latest step in China's ambitious space programme.

The lander will operate there for a year, while the rover is expected to work for some three months.

The Chang'e-3 mission landed some 12 days after being launched atop a Chinese-developed Long March 3B rocket from Xichang in the country's south.

BBC



posted on Dec, 14 2013 @ 05:33 PM
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zilebeliveunknown
If anyone is interested to look at LROC quick map, coords of the landing site has been identified

Lat: ~44.1260, Lon: ~-19.5014.

Cool

Thanks, I had a thorough look. But it shows only one LROC footprint that covers that stop, and it isn't very good. wms.lroc.asu.edu...
I'd love to find that bouldery crater visible in Chinese images.

[Edit] Here's a better LROC site: wms.lroc.asu.edu...
and some of the footprints it gives:
wms.lroc.asu.edu...
wms.lroc.asu.edu...
edit on 14-12-2013 by wildespace because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 14 2013 @ 05:55 PM
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reply to post by wildespace
 


Read on the Planetary Society Blog that LRO might attempt to photograph the rover


Also, this interesting tidbit about plans for Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter observations, from a comment on a previous Chang'e post: "LRO will be attempting to collect spectrographic data from the LAMP instrument as close to the landing time as possible, primarily to see the rocket plume and the dust kicked up from the landing. The camera will image the lander some time after the landing, but even at the spectacular resolution of the LRO Camera, there probably won't be much more than a blur to see."


Planetary society blog

And from the LRO website:



On the day of the anticipated Chang'e 3 landing, the spacecraft will do up to eight spacecraft maneuvers to scan an area near the landing site with the Lyman-Alpha Mapping Project (LAMP) instrument, an ultraviolet imaging spectrometer. LAMP will be looking for a signature of the exhaust plume from the spacecraft. Beginning in December, the LRO Camera (LROC) will be able to image the lander and rover at approximately 2 meter per pixel resolution on a monthly basis as the rotation of the moon brings the landing site underneath the LRO orbit plane. Repeated imaging of the landing site by LROC will allow for detailed measurements of changes to the surface caused by the landing and movement of the Chang’e 3 rover.


LRO website

edit on 14/12/2013 by Hellhound604 because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 14 2013 @ 06:08 PM
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scotsdavy1
China's Jade Rabbit robot rover has driven off its landing module and on to the Moon's surface.



Thats sooner than I expected.
I'm much more used to the NASA way of taking everything very slowly, one small step at a time, days for self checking and analysis, etc...



By comparison, when the Curiosity rover landed on Mars, it took a while...
Landed: Aug. 5, 2012
First drive: Aug. 22, 2012

Spirit rover
Landing date: January 4, 2004,
First drive: January 14.

Opportunity rover
Landing date: January 25, 2004
First drive: January 31, 2004


edit on 14-12-2013 by alfa1 because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 14 2013 @ 07:28 PM
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reply to post by scotsdavy1
 


withdrawn
edit on 14-12-2013 by Donkey_Dean because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 14 2013 @ 07:41 PM
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reply to post by mirageman
 



Indeed......

The new rover is currently transmitting a repeated coded signal back to Earth in what appears to Morse Code or binary;




01000001 01101100 01101100 00100000 01011001 01101111 01110101 01110010 00100000 01000010 01100001 01110011 01100101 00100000 01000001 01110010 01100101 00100000 01000010 01100101 01101100 01101111 01101110 01100111 00100000 01110100 01101111 00100000 01010101 01110011 00100000 01011011 01001110 01101111 01110100 00100000 01010101 01010011 01011101





I love it!

Although, I tend to be partial to the latin though...



posted on Dec, 14 2013 @ 07:52 PM
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Here's the video of the rover rolling out:


China's first moon rover, Yutu, or Jade Rabbit, separated from the lander early on Sunday, several hours after the Chang'e-3 probe soft-landed on the lunar surface.

The 140 kg six-wheeled rover touched the lunar surface at 4:35 a.m., leaving deep trace on the loose lunar soil. The process was recorded by the camera on the lander and the images were sent to the earth, according to the Beijing Aerospace Control Center.

We are back on the Moon!


You can follow updates and images or videos at the official China Space Facebook page.



posted on Dec, 14 2013 @ 09:26 PM
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Maxatoria
Waits for the 'They never landed on the moon and its all done in a parking lot in beijing' threads


Don't be daft, they could paint stars on the parking lot roofs then.

It would throw the entire scam out of whack.




posted on Dec, 14 2013 @ 09:38 PM
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scotsdavy1
reply to post by AutumnWitch657
 

Everyone else does then....


No, who?

I put more faith in nasa to do what hey do, than for a bunch of amateur astronomers who can't work out which way is up, telling us all that nasa are lying to everyone because they think there are aliens on the moon.

Seriously, I do...
edit on 14-12-2013 by winofiend because: astrology... im over the moon.. oO



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