Electromagnetism, UFOs, and the Weaponization of Alien Technology

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posted on Oct, 26 2013 @ 08:19 PM
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reply to post by The GUT
 


Recently, Terence McKenna's brother, Dennis, has gone on the record to state that the experiences had under the influence of certain substances, particularly mushrooms, cannot always be trusted. Dennis is the more scientific and rational of the two. He does believe that some information can be received non-locally, but a mish-mash of the individual's own memories and thoughts can occur and present itself in such an alien and profound way as to seem like an absolute reality. When the reality could very well be that you are ripped out of your mind on a drug. But that last argument is used too often, and it dismisses some more genuine insights. It is important not to have "black and white thinking errors" - or throwing the proverbial baby out with the bathwater.

I think it is safe to say that one needs to exercise extreme caution and rational apprehension in regards to "tripping" - and it is not always reliable or credible. It is however, great food for thought. Terence was basically a "funny idea" generator. And like science-fiction, funny ideas about reality can lead to artistic and technological breakthroughs in the real, physical world.




posted on Oct, 26 2013 @ 08:27 PM
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And Crick has admitted the inspiration for the "Double Helix", came not from a dream as he had stated for many years, rather this...


Crick comes clean about the inpiration for the double helix



posted on Oct, 26 2013 @ 08:46 PM
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reply to post by corsair00
 


Wouldn't it seem to reason though that said species were a later addition to this planet's biosphere (explaining its unique composition) and therefore not an attempt to phone home?
I mean, if humanity itself were an attempt to phone home then one would expect everything else on earth to resemble the chemical composition of the mushroom.

Unless the murshroom itself is sending information back to the home planet through the astral, as it were.

Isn't that a neat idea... yeah, those dudes were definitely using. Haha



posted on Oct, 26 2013 @ 08:54 PM
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corsair00

Nevermind. Excellent reply that last bit in many less words than I had posted here!


edit on 26-10-2013 by The GUT because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 26 2013 @ 09:08 PM
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Either way you look at it its all hit or miss. Any type of technique one devises to gain "secret knowledge" of life, the cosmos, whatever, is going to come with risks.

NONE of this info is for the feint of heart. In fact, just the very premise of this thread is too much for many, many people to process. It has the word 'alien' in it. May as well be talking purple unicorns for some folks.

However, there appear to be ways people are able to achieve results with various methods. Proceed with caution shouldn't even need to be said. Whether its tinkering with Tesla Coils ala Hutchison, or using a brainwave generator.



posted on Oct, 26 2013 @ 09:32 PM
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JayinAR
However, there appear to be ways people are able to achieve results with various methods. Proceed with caution shouldn't even need to be said. Whether its tinkering with Tesla Coils ala Hutchison, or using a brainwave generator.

Actually, I speak to myself, too. Some of the pm's I get have made me want to be a little more cautious and more clear that some of the topics discussed here aren't necessarily advocated nor are they the be-all-end-all for personal development. ATS is...umm...changing somewhat. A wider variety of personality types let's say. Sorry--sincerely--for making it sound like the ball was just in your court, Jay.

Some folk seem to think I'm advocating alien/entity contact and remote viewing. I'm NOT. I thought I was clear in stating there could be undesired consequences, but apparently I wasn't.

edit on 26-10-2013 by The GUT because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 26 2013 @ 09:37 PM
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reply to post by JayinAR
 


Good point - and I'm not sure. I think he was suggesting that it came in to Earth's biology much later in the game, but he also has a theory that our primate ancestors, under increasing pressure on the African grasslands, came across psilocybin mushrooms and incorporated them into their diet. He has an entire book and thesis on that subject called 'Food of the Gods'. At small doses, the mushrooms increased visual acuity and promoted more successful hunting abilities, at higher doses it promoted orgiastic sexual activity from the Central Nervous System arousal, and at the highest doses it promoted linguistic activities and forming new and advanced neural pathways, as well as synergistic religious visions and ideas. That, in a nutshell, is how human consciousness came into being - according to Terence McKenna.

Notice that our UFOlogical friends often suggest an alien intervention into early human history. That we were cloned etc. Well, if the mushroom is an anomalous organism that did not evolve here, sculpted the human mind out of more primitive levels of consciousness, and gives visionary glimpses of alien worlds and speaks to people, saying it came from outer space - then we have an alternative "alien"/shamanic hypothesis. One that is just as likely and just as worthy as the Zecharia Sitchin varieties of the conspiracy world. In fact, it might make the most sense out of all the theories of human origins. It's just one needs to be well-read on the various stages of the theory. I cannot lay it all out in a single post on a forum.

The general premise of it, though, is that the mushroom was responsible for birthing humanity into a simple, Nature-worshiping nomadic peoples. A type of early paradise that included art and storytelling and tools and a balanced relationship between the sexes. According to the theory, this connection faded as the African continent progressively dried up - which in turn made the rich, watery and psychedelic connection in the now-human mind dry up. What returned was the male-dominant ego structure found in all primates. It was like a fall in the garden. The subsequent formation of the ego grew like a tumor, and by then we had discovered the natural cycles of life like sexual consummation and birth, the planting of seeds and the growth of food plants etc. So a gradual emphasis on "my children", "my woman", "my food", "my property" etc etc is what occurred. Other relationships to different plants and drugs have evolved over the different lands and cultures over time, promoting entirely different values than the original psychedelic ideal.

Therefore, Gordon Wasson and the 1960s hippie movement, complete with the Aviary spooks and occult cast of characters, mark a return or re-discovery of this previous epoch in human history. What happened in Haight Ashbury in the 60s was a definite and marked revolution and a turning on, tuning in and dropping out. Once the political powerbrokers caught wind of that, they shut it down, and we have been reeling from those consequences ever since. But once again it is returning. In the form of various studies, such as Rick Strassman's '___' studies, the resurgence of shamanic anthropological studies, which includes the keen eye of people like John Alexander etc.

If it is true that the original proliferation of mushroom use occurred in our distant past, with a variety of evolutionary results, the same could be said of it returning again. But then again, it does not necessarily have to be just mushrooms, but the variety of techniques that can lessen the death-grip of the left-hemisphere dominant ego. Meditation, drumming, chanting, etc. As well as anything that can give people, especially scientists with political clout, the insights to develop technologies that could get us off the planet. The most revolutionary scientific discoveries occur in altered states of consciousness.



posted on Oct, 26 2013 @ 09:54 PM
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corsair00
which includes the keen eye of people like John Alexander etc.

It might be that you just don't understand the mindset of the "keen eyes" of people like that. He actually thinks that many of your theories--as you've stated elsewhere--make you an idiot and a foolish "conspiracy theorist."

On his AMA, if you recall, he stated that you got your Aquino thread all wrong and he seemed rather dismissive.

Also, If he can be trusted on the matter, he also stated that he hasn't personally used any enhancements and yet he comes to many shamanic conclusions you find "keen."

I guess I do need to address why I don't find McKenna that important:

In one of the McKenna quotes you posted he stated:


A voice. Everybody knows this who has to do with this stuff. Gordon Wasson, Richard Schultes, Albert Hoffmann - the giants know that this stuff is animate. This is not a drug. It's something that is disguising itself as a drug in order not to spread alarm. There is a voice which speaks to you in the language of your homeland - whether that be Mazatecan or English - and the voice surprises you. In other words, you cannot anticipate it.


My thoughts are generally in my native English. I admit to the ocassional, "Oy Vay!" or some such, but I'm sure you can see how the above isn't very deep and is certainly no more than a statement to fit an opinion.

McKenna is interesting enough…for a minute, but I can't personally see him as any kind of ultimate visionary.

He became a popular personality in the psychedelic rave/dance scene of the early 1990s, with frequent spoken word performances at raves and contributions to psychedelic and goa trance albums by The Shamen, Spacetime Continuum, Alien Project, Capsula, Entheogenic, Zuvuya, Shpongle, and Shakti Twins…

en.wikipedia.org...

Raves were fun enough, I've been to lots, but take a look at what that movement left in it's wake. Certainly not a mass of enlightened folk.

Nor do I find artificial intelligence to be an improvement on consciousness. How do we go from "all-natural buddy 'shroom" to "techno," "artificial," and "virtual?":

…In addition to psychedelic drugs, McKenna spoke on the subjects of virtual reality, which he saw as a way to artistically communicate the experience of psychedelics; techno-paganism; artificial intelligence; evolution; extraterrestrials; and aesthetic theory, specifically about art/visual experience as information representing the significance of hallucinatory visions experienced under the influence of psychedelics.

en.wikipedia.org...


I mean, I've sat around that campfire. Sure it's deep in a "contemplating the belly-button-type of way."

But exactly what is the lasting testament to just how important that train of thought or experience is?

And then there's this:

Between 1988 and 1989, Terence had an experience with psilocybin which left him unwilling to take the drug again. According to Dennis Mckenna, he "never again took mushrooms and he took other psychedelics such as '___' and Ayahuasca only on rare occasions, and with great reluctance" after the trip revealed to Terence "an abyss of utter existential despair." However, Terence continued to advocate psilocybin use until his death.

en.wikipedia.org...

An, "abyss of utter existential despair" doesn't strike me as either very profound nor any kind of gift to humanity.

Like I said; Terence was cool and all, but ultimately the message seems rather muddled and doesn't seem to offer any real answers to the human condition.

I'm not trying to be a jerk, I just personally need more substance as evidenced by life results. Don't get me started on Abbie Hoffman and that quote…




edit on 26-10-2013 by The GUT because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 26 2013 @ 10:04 PM
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The GUT
reply to post by karl 12
 

Yes, I totally agree with the shortcomings of Budden and I also find Jung to be--while certainly important--quite contrary on his own viewpoints. His "scholarly" work often differed--or failed to elaborate--on his more personal beliefs and tendencies:

The Occult World of CG Jung



I offer Budden for a few different reasons, and certainly differ with him on his final conclusions, but I do highly recommend his books. One reason I bring him up is for objectivity.

Another is that I learned a lot about EM from his books and he offers some of the most interesting case histories I've ever read. And, I must admit, he mostly argues his own points quite well.

But he eventually, imo, runs into problems and I find that aspect fascinating as well. Overall, for me, Budden describes some of the 'mechanics' of close encounters, but I find many of the case histories to be more indicative of actual contact with non-human intelligence. Budden himself almost seems to suggest it at times.

That Norwood Searchlight Incident is great, btw. Very interesting pics and analysis, too!! A must watch for those interested in the EM angle. Thanks.

Norwood UFO



Norwood UFO Bending Searchlight Beam

edit on 25-10-2013 by The GUT because: (no reason given)




In this Norwood photo here, I would like to draw everyone's attention away from the UFO and down a little, just to the right, inside the "crook" of the light beam being bent. (I think if you adjusted the contrast a bit more this will become even more apparent). There is a toroidal optical effect here. Similar to those seen near Hubble.
This suggests artificial gravity. Perhaps Lazar was on to something.
Here is another site that attempts to explain this a little better and also has other examples of UFOs appearing to bend light, including the Battle of LA photo of infamy...

www.treurniet.ca...



posted on Oct, 26 2013 @ 10:07 PM
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reply to post by The GUT
 


John Alexander has told me in personal emails that he very much respects the work of Terence McKenna and Rupert Sheldrake. Not only that, but he has public videos which go into more elaborate detail about all of the various shamanic information I have already posted. I have shared those videos already on this thread.

One question could be is it more interesting to go after the meat and potatoes of the esoteric and shamanic realities, as is being discussed here, or is it more interesting to study the covert goings-on of the various spooks themselves? For example, you have spent a lot of personal time tracking the work of John Alexander, and I have spent some time tracking the types of things that Alexander looks into, and you seem to suggest that it is not worthwhile, and that obsessing about the negative and occult aspects is somehow more worthwhile. I find that interesting.

It is also interesting that I need to reiterate a post I just made above, and I will do so in its entirety:


Recently, Terence McKenna's brother, Dennis, has gone on the record to state that the experiences had under the influence of certain substances, particularly mushrooms, cannot always be trusted. Dennis is the more scientific and rational of the two. He does believe that some information can be received non-locally, but a mish-mash of the individual's own memories and thoughts can occur and present itself in such an alien and profound way as to seem like an absolute reality. When the reality could very well be that you are ripped out of your mind on a drug. But that last argument is used too often, and it dismisses some more genuine insights. It is important not to have "black and white thinking errors" - or throwing the proverbial baby out with the bathwater.

I think it is safe to say that one needs to exercise extreme caution and rational apprehension in regards to "tripping" - and it is not always reliable or credible. It is however, great food for thought. Terence was basically a "funny idea" generator. And like science-fiction, funny ideas about reality can lead to artistic and technological breakthroughs in the real, physical world.


This thread is approaching 30 pages, we have already covered much territory - some alternative approaches are not only valid, but have been of interest to many people here, which is why I have shared more of it.

My personal Aquino thread was based on Alexander's UFO book which said that there are no covert anti-gravity programs, and the contradiction that Aquino said in his review that there were and are. That was the entire premise of the OP, and it was to that that Alexander said I was wrong about. That I was wrong to suggest that "they" were working on antigravity at Skinwalker Ranch.

In regards to the various shamanic stuff, as I have said, he is very interested in that. You are not, you are mostly interested in just him, apparently! And that's okay too.



posted on Oct, 26 2013 @ 10:12 PM
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reply to post by corsair00
 


As I posted above, they could both be right.
If they are working on gravity AMPLIFICATION as a means of propulsion, as Lazar has suggested, one could achieve 'anti-gravity' without actually working on anti-gravity, if that makes sense.



posted on Oct, 26 2013 @ 10:23 PM
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corsair00
One question could be is it more interesting to go after the meat and potatoes of the esoteric and shamanic realities, as is being discussed here, or is it more interesting to study the covert goings-on of the various spooks themselves?

"Shamanic realities," is rather vague and entirely theoretical. As far as contrasting those "realities" with "covert goings-on"...actions speak louder than words.


For example, you have spent a lot of personal time tracking the work of John Alexander, and I have spent some time tracking the types of things that Alexander looks into, and you seem to suggest that it is not worthwhile, and that obsessing about the negative and occult aspects is somehow more worthwhile. I find that interesting.

Have you looked into his enthusiastic support of merging the military and police forces? If not, then you are only looking at what you want to see and what "feels good."

Not very shamanic, the militaristic mindset, I'd say. Certainly not a "healing" modality. And, yeah, pretty important, imo. The hypocritical dichotomies of folk with considerable power always catch my attention.

edit on 26-10-2013 by The GUT because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 26 2013 @ 10:32 PM
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There's an old joke in the esoteric community that runs...

Q: How many Enochians does it take to change a light bulb?

A: Only one however only after they who change the bulb have spent 20 years understanding the true meaning of a light bulb and having spent several months scarifying their essence in the desert to prove they are worthy of fitting a light giving appliance.

Then again, there's another that runs

Q: How many kitchen witches does it take to change a light bulb?

A: Why, it's already sorted my dear.



posted on Oct, 26 2013 @ 10:41 PM
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FireMoon
There's an old joke in the esoteric community that runs...

Q: How many Enochians does it take to change a light bulb?

A: Only one however only after they who change the bulb have spent 20 years understanding the true meaning of a light bulb and having spent several months scarifying their essence in the desert to prove they are worthy of fitting a light giving appliance.

Then again, there's another that runs

Q: How many kitchen witches does it take to change a light bulb?

A: Why, it's already sorted my dear.

Haha! I only have jokes suitable for boring academic events featuring tea and scones:

Q: How many Surrealists does it take to change a light bulb?

A: Fish!

And:

Descartes walks into a sidewalk cafe and orders an espresso.

The waitress asks, "Would you like a beignet with that?

Descartes says, "I think not" and disappears!


edit on 26-10-2013 by The GUT because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 26 2013 @ 10:56 PM
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corsair00
My personal Aquino thread was based on Alexander's UFO book which said that there are no covert anti-gravity programs, and the contradiction that Aquino said in his review that there were and are. That was the entire premise of the OP, and it was to that that Alexander said I was wrong about. That I was wrong to suggest that "they" were working on antigravity at Skinwalker Ranch.

Btw, that doesn't seem to be entirely accurate. Neither Aquino nor Alexander seem to think your advocacy and/or mention of Douglas Dietrich has any merit. I agree with them on that issue.

Although I find neither Aquino or Alexander worthy of the increasing adulation/respect you seem to have for them, it doesn't take much research to determine that, in all likelihood, Dietrich is a sham. An interesting and well-read sham I admit. Why didn't you dig into Dietrich before you quoted his opinion and vid?

All I'm saying is that you don't seem to be at least nominally rigorous in your vetting of information or what you accept as valid material.

BTW x 2: Did you catch how Aquino went from, "No Alien Visitation!" on your thread to, "Roswell, ET, Heck Yeah!" on his AMA? What's up with that? Admittedly, I'm going from memory on that and will be glad to apologize if mistaken.

edit on 26-10-2013 by The GUT because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 27 2013 @ 12:01 AM
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One other thought for now is back on the topic of cars being stalled out in the presence of a UFO.
It appears this happens by interfering with the voltage in the ignition coil. This then causes the spark to die in the plugs. But it doesn't seem to happen to vehicles with a diesel motor. ... cuz the ignition coil isn't as high voltage.
Magnetic induced or ionized air are the two best things I could find as a possible cause. It seems as if the UFOs can increase or decrease the amount of air they are ionizing around their craft. This is why they appear to change size and even shape. The ionized air is then charged with plasma. Sorta like a flourescent bulb without a tube. When the size of the bubble increases, the color of the plasma will change...

Anyhow, I wonder if the UFO got close enough and enveloped the car in the ionized pocket around the craft if this would also cause the tires to deflate?? Seems maybe so.
It could also explain other effects common with high strangeness. Tingling skin, hair standing on end, etc.

ETA: if it is due to ionized air, and your engine dies, but the ignition is still in the on position, I then wonder if one the air returns to normal if the spark would just click back on as if nothing happened??
edit on 27-10-2013 by JayinAR because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 27 2013 @ 12:26 AM
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JayinAR
But it doesn't seem to happen to vehicles with a diesel motor. ... cuz the ignition coil isn't as high voltage.
Magnetic induced or ionized air are the two best things I could find as a possible cause.

A diese enginel, then, is less susceptible to magnetic interference? Because it seems like the 'magnetism' part of electromagnetism is the more active component (as in the "bending" of light.) Also remember the fairly recent findings of magnetite in our brains.

The magnetic aspect of the recent solar flares (ala Cheesy) also seems to be the culprit in the interruption of shortwave communications and there's talk that the natural flipping of the poles might be about to happen. The reason I wonder is because of the earlier material that talked about the reversal of field between RV'er Joseph McMoneagle's head and toes seemed to indicate OBE, or high-strangeness, conditions.

So, I wonder, once the poles shift this time, if we might be in a state more conducive to altered-states and suggestibility?

Of course it's speculation and a less than coherent theory, but SO many folk feel we're on the verge of something monumental...is it crazy to suggest that EM would--if or when things get wiggy--play a big part in that if it's true?

edit on 27-10-2013 by The GUT because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 27 2013 @ 12:28 AM
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JayinAR
ETA: if it is due to ionized air, and your engine dies, but the ignition is still in the on position, I then wonder if one the air returns to normal if the spark would just click back on as if nothing happened??
edit on 27-10-2013 by JayinAR because: (no reason given)


I don't think the car would automatically "click back on", because no matter the reason for a car stalling out you have to turn the key in order for the spark plugs to 'ignite', and get the engine going again...

....like, if you had a lit candle and could surround it in a 'bubble' of carbon dioxide, then take the 'bubble' away, the candle wouldn't automatically re-light just because the oxygen is back, you would still need to use a match or lighter..



posted on Oct, 27 2013 @ 12:31 AM
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reply to post by lostgirl
 

Note to Self: Bring lostgirl along on road trip.



posted on Oct, 27 2013 @ 06:36 AM
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reply to post by The GUT
 


The YouTube video which featured Douglas Dietrich talking about the Presidio abuse and The Franklin Cover-up was on my account. It was a little blurb that Dietrich did with a friend of mine on Exopolitcs UK. Aquino appeared out of nowhere a week or so before my thread and we had a conversation there. He told me that he had just been made aware of Dietrich the day before. But actually, there was an ATS thread here where he said the same thing, but from several months earlier. He told me about his book MindWar and also linked me his review for Alexander's book. Upon reading the review, I found it interesting that he put so much emphasis on covert ops technology, since Alexander was quite the contrary in his book.

I told Dietrich about the Aquino dialog on YouTube, and a few days later Aquino actually sent Dietrich a letter demanding a retraction and threatening a lawsuit. Dietrich then went on a radio show and talked more about this. I simply look into various things that I find interesting. Dietrich had a lot of people tricked, but since then even my friend at Exopolitics UK has stated he is fishy as all heck. Not only that, but he is also extremely unstable - but he could also be the fall-out of mind control work. In which case he may actually have worked with Aquino after all. In which case, he might actually be telling the truth about some of his claims. Either way, I only brought up the various factors that I had been made aware of in my OP. I also brought up Jesse Ventura's interview as well as several other things. So Alexander saying I got most of that wrong from the start is also pretty vague. His AMA participation was almost entirely vague. At least Aquino was very detailed and entertaining. Both of those 2 are clearly PsyOps anyways, so they cannot really be trusted entirely. That they are into the occult and paranormal research is very clear, and that I do believe is very genuine.

Shamanic realities is another way of saying "mind over matter phenomena". We are talking about a different worldview where spirits and the physical world overlap. John Alexander has stated in his presentations and on Coast to Coast AM that he subscribes to that worldview. That's really all I was getting at. I also subscribe to that worldview, as do many people here on ATS. Except for you, apparently, unless I am mistaken. It's always interesting when someone seems into the occult, but it turns out they have more leaning towards nuts and bolts materialism. How boring and out of date!

edit on 2013-10-27T06:39:13-05:002013Sun, 27 Oct 2013 06:39:13 -050013am39Sun, 27 Oct 2013 06:39:13 -050000 by corsair00 because: (no reason given)





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