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baphomet

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posted on Jul, 7 2011 @ 08:00 PM
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Originally posted by pepsi78
from L. As in Latin.

Yet another source


AD
www.etymonline.com...
prefix expressing direction toward or in ADDITION to, from L. ad "to, toward" in space or time; "with regard to, in relation to," as a prefix, sometimes merely emphatic, from PIE *ad- "to, near, at" (cognate with O.E. æt; see at). Simplified to a- before sc-, sp- and st-; modified to ac- before many consonants and then re-spelled af-, ag-, al- etc., in conformity with the following consonant (e.g. affection, aggression). In O.Fr., reduced to a- in all cases, but written forms were refashioned after Latin in 14c. in French and 15c. in English words picked up from Old French. In many cases pronunciation followed the shift.


This is a source for the English adverb 'ad' not the Latin one. Learn to read.

It also reaffrims what I have been telling you, 'ad-' in Latin means 'to'.


Your statement:


can not mean 'add' as in addition.


If you were in a court of law, this would be used against you. Lucky you are not, and I am not an accuser, prosecutor, since I don't like being one.


Good thing you are not either because most prosecutors will actually READ the evidence prior to using it.


I have used many valid sources


As evidence by your above blunder, you have not.

Once again, Cassell's Latin Dictionary, for the Latin impaired.

What does it say about the word 'version'?




posted on Jul, 7 2011 @ 08:04 PM
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This is a source for the English adverb 'ad' not the Latin one. Learn to read.

It is from Latin.

It's what it means in Latin.


wordinfo.info...:10/s:as?v=info&a=view_unit&s=as&page=10&u=31&spage=6
ad- +
(Latin: prefix; to, a direction toward, addition to, near; at)


What does it say ? LATIN: prefix to a directrion....addition.



It also reaffrims what I have been telling you, 'ad-' in Latin means 'to'.

You got the dictionary as for the rest I have posted from lots and lots of dictionaries all come up with the same thing.



www.etymonline.com...
version Look up version at Dictionary.com
1580s, "a translation," from M.Fr. version, from M.L. versionem (nom. versio) "a turning," from pp. stem of L. vertere "to turn" (see versus). Also with a M.E. sense of "destruction;" the meaning "particular form of a description" is first attested 1788.




wordinfo.info...
version
This entry is located in the following unit: vers-, vert-, -verse, -version, -version, -versation, -versal, -versary, -vert, vort-, vors- (page 17)
vers-, vert-, -verse, -version, -version, -versation, -versal, -versary, -vert, vort-, vors-
(Latin: bend, turn)


This is not even a dictionary.


www.archive.org...


As ignorant as you are, I'm going to stay here until you have no words left, until you run out of arguments, I'll be here, to show people what a good fellow you are "high ranking mason"


edit on 7-7-2011 by pepsi78 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 7 2011 @ 08:24 PM
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Originally posted by pepsi78
It is from Latin.

It's what it means in Latin.


Include the relevant text:


The Latin element ad carries the idea of "in the direction of" and combines with many Latin words and roots to make common English words.


You left out that part and you need to stop trying to define Latin words with English dictionaries.


You got the dictionary as for the rest I have posted from lots and lots of dictionaries all come up with the same thing.


You are using English dictionaries. What does the LATIN DICTIONARY say. The words you are looking up did not even exist in Latin.




www.etymonline.com...
version Look up version at Dictionary.com
1580s, "a translation," from M.Fr. version, from M.L. versionem (nom. versio) "a turning," from pp. stem of L. vertere "to turn" (see versus). Also with a M.E. sense of "destruction;" the meaning "particular form of a description" is first attested 1788.


You keep quoting this entry but it has nothing to do with addition and does not support your point.


This is not even a dictionary.


Cassell's Latin Dictionary

It most certainly is.

As a matter of fact, it is the ONLY complete dictionary for Latin to English translation.

Maybe your computer is reaaaaally slow and you need an memory upgrade (add-on).

Still waiting for you to post what the Latin translation is. Maybe some day.



posted on Jul, 7 2011 @ 08:29 PM
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Include the relevant text:



lexfiles.info...
ad- (Latin: to, a direction toward, addition to, near; used as a prefix).






wordquests.info.../hsphere/local/home/scribejo/wordquests.info/htm/d0000029.htm&HIGHLIGHT=acquire
ad- (Latin: to, a direction toward, addition to, near; used as a prefix).




You left out that part and you need to stop trying to define Latin words with English dictionaries.

It's L as in Latin





It most certainly is.

It is not, it's an archive source (same source you commented on when I posted material) (ironic)

As for the material from the source please quote it in an external quote, I am not obligated to search your material.

This is an external quote:


Example

I can't seem to find it.


edit on 7-7-2011 by pepsi78 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 8 2011 @ 01:35 AM
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Originally posted by Sigismundus
reply to post by theron dunn

Hi Theron Dunn ----
Bro. Dunn died in May 2008. I wouldn't expect a response from him any time soon.



posted on Jul, 8 2011 @ 07:29 AM
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Originally posted by pepsi78
It's L as in Latin


That is the Enlish definition of the word 'ad' indicating its Latin source. In Latin it means 'to'.


It is not, it's an archive source (same source you commented on when I posted material) (ironic)


Who cares if it says 'archive'? It is Cassell's Latin Dictionary online. The complete text. Latin and English. No word for 'version'.


As for the material from the source please quote it in an external quote, I am not obligated to search your material.


Maybe if you learend how to use it we could prevent you from making more idiotic blanket statements about Latin (which you obviously know very, very little).


I can't seem to find it.


Of course you can not find the defintion you are looking for. BECAUSE IT DOES NOT EXISIT IN LATIN. That is the point. You do nnot know Latin and you constantly pretend like you do. Like the absurd overlooking of the 'time locative' (which inidcates tense) and insisting that it meant the defintion of 'time'.



posted on Jul, 8 2011 @ 07:40 AM
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Of course you can not find the defintion you are looking for. BECAUSE IT DOES NOT EXISIT IN LATIN. That is the point. You do nnot know Latin and you constantly pretend like you do. Like the absurd overlooking of the 'time locative' (which inidcates tense) and insisting that it meant the defintion of 'time'.

Because the word came from to turn, that means that to turn = version.



posted on Jul, 8 2011 @ 07:48 AM
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Originally posted by pepsi78
Because the word came from to turn, that means that to turn = version.


You obviously have no clue what you are talking about because there is no word 'version' in Latin. Look it up if you disagree. The word was created in the 14-15th century.

If Latin were a person you would have been arrested by now for habitual abuse.



posted on Jul, 8 2011 @ 07:52 AM
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reply to post by AugustusMasonicus
 

The word for version in Latin is to turn. It's what version means.



wordinfo.info...
version
This entry is located in the following unit: vers-, vert-, -verse, -version, -version, -versation, -versal, -versary, -vert, vort-, vors- (page 17)
vers-, vert-, -verse, -version, -version, -versation, -versal, -versary, -vert, vort-, vors-
(Latin: bend, turn)



edit on 8-7-2011 by pepsi78 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 8 2011 @ 07:55 AM
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Originally posted by Sigismundus

Here is a quote from Manly P. Hall regarding BAPHOMET (which he equates with the Bringer of the Light i.e. the sun god, i.e. LUCI-FER (lit. ‘bearer of the Lux, or Light’)


No it's not. The quote is fake, and is not found in Hall's book. In fact, the word "Baphomet" is nowhere found in the book at all.


edit on 8-7-2011 by Masonic Light because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 8 2011 @ 07:56 AM
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Originally posted by pepsi78
The word for version in Latin is to turn. It's what version means.


Wrong. That is the English definition. It does not exist in Latin. Use Cassell's and prove me otherwise. Your lack of Latin understanding constantly betrays you.



posted on Jul, 8 2011 @ 08:03 AM
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reply to post by AugustusMasonicus
 


The word comes from Vertere


.m-w.com...
ADVERSARY
If you've ever had someone turn on you and become your adversary, you've inadvertently lived out the etymology of "adversary." The word is from the Latin adjective "adversarius" ("turned toward" or "antagonistic toward"), which in turn can be traced back to the verb "advertere," meaning "to turn to." "Advertere" itself derives from "ad-" and "vertere" ("turn"), and "vertere" is the source of a number of English words.




Latin versi, versin-, from Latin versus, past participle of vertere, to turn; see wer-2 in Indo-European roots.]


I can not recreate the characters in latin, look at the "O" version It's in latin



www.thefreedictionary.com...
Latin versio, version-, from Latin versus, past participle of vertere


First Vertere, then versio then version, it's how it came to be. Version in latin spelled with the "O" having a cap on top of it.

Here is the "O"

edit on 8-7-2011 by pepsi78 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 8 2011 @ 08:18 AM
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Originally posted by pepsi78
The word comes from Vertere


These are all French and English defintions of the word. There is no Latin word for 'version', give it up. If there were you would have found it in Cassell's by now and rewritten the Latin language.

I am not interested in words that are derived from Latin (which is what you continue to post). What is the Latin word for 'version'? Answer: THERE IS NONE AND YOU ARE WRONG.



posted on Jul, 8 2011 @ 08:22 AM
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Originally posted by AugustusMasonicus

Originally posted by pepsi78
The word comes from Vertere


These are all French and English defintions of the word. There is no Latin word for 'version', give it up. If there were you would have found it in Cassell's by now and rewritten the Latin language.


It's not french but medieval Latin, it state clear from medieval Latin


I am not interested in words that are derived from Latin (which is what you continue to post). What is the Latin word for 'version'? Answer: THERE IS NONE AND YOU ARE WRONG.

You have the answer, I posted it.



posted on Jul, 8 2011 @ 08:22 AM
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Originally posted by AugustusMasonicus

Originally posted by pepsi78
The word comes from Vertere


These are all French and English defintions of the word. There is no Latin word for 'version', give it up. If there were you would have found it in Cassell's by now and rewritten the Latin language.


It's not french but medieval Latin, it state clear from medieval Latin


I am not interested in words that are derived from Latin (which is what you continue to post). What is the Latin word for 'version'? Answer: THERE IS NONE AND YOU ARE WRONG.

You have the answer, I posted it, "O" with cap on it.

from Medieval Latin versio, version


Clasical Latin alphabet O with a cap, you can view it in the image, it's under the big normal "O"


These things are called "diacritics"
edit on 8-7-2011 by pepsi78 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 8 2011 @ 08:31 AM
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Originally posted by pepsi78
It's not french but medieval Latin, it state clear from medieval Latin


'Version' is not a Latin word.



from Medieval Latin versio, version


'Versio' is a third declension noun derived from 'versus' and means 'turned', it does not mean 'add' as you continue to mistakenly believe. You do not understand Latin and your repeated fumblings with this language are pathetic.

There is no Latin word for 'version'. Give it up. If there were you would have used a Latin dictionary to prove me wrong by now.



posted on Jul, 8 2011 @ 08:33 AM
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reply to post by AugustusMasonicus
 


www.thefreedictionary.com...
With O with a cap on top of it.

, from Medieval Latin versio, version


They all come from vertere, to turn, same meaning in latin same in english.

edit on 8-7-2011 by pepsi78 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 8 2011 @ 08:44 AM
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Originally posted by pepsi78
They all come from vertere, to turn, same meaning in latin same in english.


Show me in any LATIN DICTIONARY the word 'version'. Prove me wrong. Stop using English dicitonaries.

You do not use a Chinese dictionary for Korean words, similarly you do not use an English dictionary for Latin words. What is so hard for you to understand (other than Latin)?

USE A LATIN DICTIONARY.



posted on Jul, 8 2011 @ 08:46 AM
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Show me in any LATIN DICTIONARY the word 'version'. Prove me wrong. Stop using English dicitonaries.

It is a dictionary, it's the notion of dictionary to translate from one language to another.



posted on Jul, 8 2011 @ 08:53 AM
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From Oxford dictionary.

Origin of the word:


oxforddictionaries.com...
Origin:

Late Middle English (in the sense ‘translation’): from French, or from medieval Latin versio(n-), from Latin vertere 'to turn'


Or from medieval Latin Version

(ohh no augustus is wrong)



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